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Class of 1966,

Greetings.


For those of you who could not make it, you were greatly missed!


The Centennial Celebration of the School of Architecture School was a very big event with over 800+ architects from east and west coasts and 5 foreign countries. Bill Pederson and number of other illustrious alumni where there along with illustrious alumni from the class of 1965, 1966 & 1967. One always seems to remember one class above and one class below yours.


For the class of 1966 members who were there, I am including pictures of our Saturday morning brunch & at "spoonriver' restaurant (see attached pictures). We had a lively discussion of times past and present. Brief one line summary of where the 6 attendee's live and what they are up to:


James Pettinari lives in Eugene, Oregon and just retired from teaching but still consults with the University of MN on planning issues.


Gerry Allen still practices and teaches at the College of Art and Design in Minneapolis and lives in Afton, MN


Jim Morss lives on Bainbridge Island 20 minute ferry ride from Seattle and still practices specializing in medical clinic planning & design.


Jim Wengler lives & works on a boat in Trinidad but still keeps his residence in St. Anthony Park in St. Paul 2 blocks from my house.


Peter Hall lives in Maiden Rock, Wisconsin and is working on transforming an older building into a brewery.


I am still working at Parker Design International (PDI Design Group)after retiring for the 2nd time and live in St. Paul.


Keep the class of 1966 conversation going and let us know what you are up to. We heard back from a few who could not attend the Centennial; Bill Burch, Gary Crowell, Tom Clark, Jack Smuckler, John Scott, Mark Merrill . How about Carl Safe, Harvey Niskala, and others. Does anyone know the whereabouts' of Nick Palaia, Lowell Baumgardt, Pier Dahlstrom or any others I am missing from our class. If you do let us all know. Thanks


Francis Bulbulian, FAIA
fbulbulian@pdidg.com

Hello Class of '66!


Regrets. Kit and I won't be able to be in the Midwest in October. Sounds like fun! Sorry to miss it. Would love to see everybody again and catch up a bit on the last half century.

TRUE STORY


I still have this recurring dream in which I'm back in the design studio. Everybody is working hard on their quarter-long project and the jury is going to start in a few minutes. Only one of the projects is going to pass and the rest are all going to have to be re-designed next quarter. I'm not worried though because somehow in the dream I seem to realize I've got about 50 years of experience as a lead designer, so I am confident I can do this school project.


In the dream, all the models are on display in a big glass enclosure built in the middle of the architecture court. The students are outside the enclosure waiting to receive the news as to which of us will have to re-design and which one of us will pass and graduate. Rapson comes out of the glass door to the enclosure carrying an envelope. He opens it and reads the name of the architect whose project wins the award and graduates. "The winner is..."


...Francis Bulbulian!" The crowd cheers and gathers around Fran to congratulate him. Even after 50 years, and in my OWN dreams, Francis always does an outstanding job! Next time I have this dream, I'm going to try to install my own brother on the Jury. Hopefully that will give me more favorable result!


.....


I had a chance to read some of the other memories posted at this site. It's fun to see what people remember about Minnesota. In a word, the experience was INTENSE. Here's a bit more information just to add some context to that recurring dream I described above:


Fran and I went through the architectural curriculum at the same time. We were two of less than a dozen students in our class that did it in the catalog-prescribed time frame. Both of us roomed in an old house about two blocks from the Architecture building. John Scott, John Sheehy, Mark Merrill, Scott Berry, and a couple other architecture students shared those beat-up facilities.


I remember the common bathroom in that old house had a shower with a shower curtain. Behind that curtain, lived some sort of moldy living "organism" that we all assumed covered the entire interior of the shower stall and might very well have been the same species as the carnivorous plant in the play, "Little Shop of Horrors." I use the term, "assumed" because nobody ever actually dared to fully open that shower curtain, let alone risk taking a shower in there.


Not surprisingly, my wife Kit, who knew us all, says what she remembers most about the architecture lab was the pervasive "aroma" of unwashed architecture students that apparently permeated the concrete and masonry so that it never quite dissipated.


Kit and I knew Fran's wife Barb from before she and Fran started dating. We've all tried to stay in touch over the years. Francis was in my wedding and I considered him my closest friend in architecture school. My earliest recollection of a specific conversation with Fran was in Jim Stageberg's design studio. It was very late one night, right before our project was due. Fran was walking past my desk, I stopped him to ask his frank opinion of my project, which I was just finishing. I said something like, "...Well, what do you think of it?"


His response was, as always, honest and fairly typical of the way we all often talked to each other. He paused; looked over the drawing taped to my drawing board, thought about it for a few seconds and then replied, "I don't think I could EVER do anything that BAD!!"


That phrase often comes to mind, when anybody asks, "Well, what do you think of it? (a design idea)?" it still makes me laugh, even after more than 50 years.


My general impression of the architectural curriculum is mixed. Generally, I loved the experience enough to spend the rest of my life in this business. But, at first, it was something of a cold bath, after a rather warm and fuzzy but undemanding high school education. It's where I first was required to actually systematically THINK critically.


And, of course, like many students, I quickly found that the highest standard for graphic excellence that I had previously encountered wasn't even at the bottom of the scale when one was comparing one's drawings to those of Rapson, Gebhart, Vitolis, Larson, and so many other talents.


The major career impact of my experiences at Minnesota was to set my personal standard for design excellence continually beyond my reach. The result has been a career that has never been boring, always exciting, and always challenging.


Best regards to all,

Tom Clark

----

Tom Clark, CSI, Principal

THOMAS CLARK ARCHITECT

5820 York Rd; Baltimore, MD 21212

410 539 6830

Dear "Class of '66" -


A possible last minute flight (?). I'm scheduled to be in Denver on 28th for "closing details" on property--have held property in CO since teaching at U of C (1978-90). Although I most likely won't make it, I have a couple of vivid memories to share:


  • 1965--Catching 2 hours sleep in the "refrigerator crate" in studio before final presentation.

  • 1966--Sitting in my VW, in a parking lot (during mid May/June rain storm), several blocks from Northrop Auditorium--listening to commencement on the radio.

  • 1978--Francis, our "last lunch" in Fall '78--recalling 15+ years of work (1962-78--U of M and MIT studios, Dewey Thorbeck and InterDesign, Ellerbe, etc.). We were leaving Ellerbe--I was going to Colorado (teaching--U of C) and you were going back to Leonard--as I recall.)


Best to all,

Gary

Gary J. Crowell, AIA, NCARB
Dean and Professor Emeritus
College of Architecture & the Built Environment
Philadelphia University
215.843.7288 (H)
267.438.9856 (C)

crowellg@philau.edu

WEB-Ralph Rapson and Joel H. Goodman 1975 EA Classroom with wind turbines student project review.jpg


WEB-EA I assemble student project 1975.jpg


These photos were taken in 1975 at an Earth Awareness Portable Classroom review in Rapson Hall. I was a faculty member at the time, teaching a studio design course. As extra work, I initiated the Earth Awareness Portable Classroom project with students from Dennis Holloway's environmental design course. I offered the project to Holloway's many many students, and a team took on the project.


An undergrad student mechanical engineering project was coordinated with the Earth Awareness Portable Classroom project being designed and fabricated by architecture students spring quarter of 1975. Renewable energy systems were designed for a transportable educational resource, an inflatable classroom that could be entered for media presentations. Prof. Frohrib's ME 5-254 and 5-255 engineering students presented two basic energy systems; power for the systems of the earth balloon (lighting, projection, fan) and power for transporting the portable facility in a truck (small wind generators, batteries, and a multi fuel truck motor). Small tilt up and down wind generators were mounted on the top of the truck.


Students on the project are pictured in front of Ralph Rapson and me (Joel Goodman). Dan Feidt is pictured with the video camera in the lower photo.



After attending the U of MN, Joel went on to earn an Master of Architecture degree from MIT. He currently resides in Dodgeville, Wisconsin.


View a gallery of some of his work

AND

http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Joel_Goodman

http://solarcooking.org/Joel_Goodman.htm

University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '63, B.Arch '67
ISU - M.Arch '75
Oxford Brookes University, UK - PhD '96

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
The need to get beyond elitist notions of social change that were inherent in modernism as taught in the '60s and to honestly engage community and user interests in the design process.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
A visiting lecturer from Scandinavia in the '60s, who engaged students in rich conversations about their design work, making the link to its social importance and the students' experience.

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
I have had four Peace Corps assignments through my career years; rural school construction in Colombia in '63-'65, disaster management work in Peru in 1970, the Cook Islands in '98, and El Salvador in '99.
University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '67, B.Arch '67

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Design process.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Richard Morrill installed confidence, encouragement, and provided opportunity for two career changes.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
All nighters, juries, and fellow students.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Neighborship planned community. 

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Rapson rendering!

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
Think of the big picture, not just the details. 

University of Minnesota - B.Arch '67
Harvard College - B.A. Arch '64
MIT - M.Arch '68

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Design process.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Fellow students and their dedication to architecture, Lonnie Hauser for the love of life, and Leonard Parker for design discipline.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
Midnight parades around the second floor balcony.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Group display depicting the 1966 Rome trip.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
The beginning of interest in sustainable design. 

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
Belief in the importance of education and travel in the training of young designers has led me to establish the Cavin Family Traveling Fellowship (see cavinfellowship.org). 

University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '67

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Teamwork.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Really impossible to single out one individual, especially with the benefit of years of hindsight. Ralph Rapson, of course. Dewey Thorbeck for his team approach, integrity, design skills. David Bennett, Dennis Holloway, Tom Bender, Hosni Iskander for encouraging me to look to non-traditional environmental approaches to architecture. Last but not least, Lance Lavine, the first written thesis at the school, a tireless educator of environmental ethics and action.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
Working with fellow students and APX brothers to complete projects. 

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Working with Mark Beckman on our thesis, with Tom Martinson's invaluable assistance in the darkroom, on Archiecoframe.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Malcolm Wells, and Charles Gwathmey.

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
Founded a firm that has provided assistance on millions of square feet of building construction to significantly reduce their negative energy and environmental impact.

University of Minnesota - B.Arch '66
MIT - M.Arch '68

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
I learned how to develop architectural conceptual ideas into designs that can be realized and associated communication techniques.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Ralph Rapson accepted me into the School of Architecture at Grade 3 design as a transfer student from the University of Illinois. We met in his office over the steak restaurant and he said, "Come on." There was not much bureaucracy at that time. The University of Minnesota architectural education environment at that time greatly influenced me, and Rapson for the most part organized and formed it.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
The educational sincerity, atmosphere of integrity, and camaraderie with students and faculty in the architecture court building.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
The University of California at Santa Cruz Arts Theater Center thesis project.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
To search for a synthesis of structural-material logic and non-whimsical aesthetic forms. A lasting and important influence was the quality of the architectural court building design. I think I was overly influenced by Rapson's grease pencil cartoon drawing style. Most students, as I did as well, tried and followed the rendering styles that were in fashion at the time. However, looking back it was the quality of the architecture court building design and the vibration of earnestness from the cumulative efforts of the faculty and students that has had the most lasting quality influence. The School of Architecture court building, as I realized years after my student and teaching days at the U of M, is an outstanding and rare integration of the influences of the minimum slim steel clean spaces of Mies and the hyperbolic shells of Candella, North and South, unified with the daylit court pedestrian square, all wrapped in the unpretentious humility of Midwest brick masonry. It touched me in my formative days like no other building has. Is it John Rauma that we have to thank for the design of the School of Architecture court building?

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
Environmental regeneration as a basis for urban design and building integrated active solar energy research.

University of Minnesota - B.Arch '62

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
I learned the ability to organize planning thoughts and ideas into a design solution. I also learned about the concept of space and the importance of space in building design.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Ralph Rapson was the most inspiring faculty member. He seemed to do more and accomplish more than other faculty or local architects. He also had a fine quality of humility and I was deeply disappointed that the National AIA did not give him the Gold Medal he so richly deserved.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
My favorite memory from the studio days was moving from the main engineering (Lind Hall) attic to the new architecture building.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
My thesis project was a golf course clubhouse at Braemar Golf Course in Edina. Later, HGA designed a clubhouse, before I joined the firm, that had many similarities to my thesis design.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
I think the Miesian (Ludwig Mies van der Rohe) philosophy of design, "Less is More," was the most influential force on me as a student.

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
The School of Architecture provided me with the training and development as a young architect so I could grow and participate in the design of significant buildings that help facilitate research, education, the manufacture of medical devices, and the medical treatment of people.