Recently in 2000-2009 Category

University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '96, B.Arch '96, M.Arch '04

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
A visiting (at the time) professor, Renee Cheng, who taught a tectonics class that really opened up the way we should explore materials and techniques.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
Traveling through Europe in spring of 1999 with Eric, Aaron, Donovan, and Chris and eventually meeting up with Arthur Chen to participate in the Port Cities study abroad class in Lisbon, Barcelona, and Venice. A very interesting and memorable trip through some of the oldest and most varied cities in Europe.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
A housing project for the Phillips Neighborhood with Arthur Chen. The studio worked with actual clients and a predetermined program of needs. It allowed us to really explore our (sometimes drastic) ideas about how to best provide community housing and to learn how to interact and respond to community relations.

University of Minnesota - B.S. Arch '05, Metropolitan Design Certificate '09, M.Arch '09

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Work like a crazy person.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Dissecting corn.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Louis Kahn.

University of Minnesota - BED '03

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Alternative ways of thinking. 
University of Minnesota - B.S. Arch '08

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Parametrics.
University of Minnesota - B.S. Arch '03, M.Arch '05 

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
How to tackle a problem from various avenues.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Andrzej Piotrowski.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
Late nights with friends talking design.



University of Minnesota - B.S. Arch '03, M.Arch '07

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Model building and 3-D rendering skills.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Tom Fisher.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
Seeing people sleep under their desk.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Nicollet Ave redesign.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Steven Holl.

University of Minnesota - B.S. Arch '08

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Iteration. 
University of Minnesota - M.Arch '05

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
Theory, research-based design, precedent study, and integration of design at detail scale.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Renee Cheng for being the best possible mentor a grad student could hope for and Julie Snow as a visiting critic, a later employer, and a complete inspiration for practice.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
They mostly relate to a pervasive sense of place, romanticized by memories of cozy winter nights in studio with snow falling, an urban walk to campus with fall leaves, the downtown views from campus, breaks from studio to go to yoga or swim at the rec center, and of course the invention of various quesadillas on Nick Potts' quesadilla maker.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
Bell Museum with Cheng in GD2 studio, Urban Infill in Mic Johnson's GD3 studio, and Pre-Fab Motel in Charlie Lazor's GD2 studio.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
The study of fabrication methods in application to design with Charlie Lazor, the research of multi-functional details as the heart of design with Renee Cheng for Graduate Research Assistant projects, and modern, elegant, sleek, rigorous architecture distilled to its cleanest elements in the practice of Julie Snow and the infused legacy of Scandinavian aesthetic in the area.

University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '03
Rice University - M.Arch '07

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
I believe that for me, the seeds for a continuous strive for clarity in an idea were planted at the U; that there must be an engagement, ambition, and intensity for architecture to advance design and influence impact into the built environment.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Thomas Fisher influenced me to instill a positive and inquisitive attitude, thoughtfulness in work and goals, both personally and architecturally. I was always impressed by Tom's sensitivity and wisdom. Robert Adams and Dawn Gilpin had a very lasting impression of instilling clarity of thought, intensity, purpose, and quality in ALL work. My fellow students in the Honor Program, and our shared commitment to the discourse, collective skills and knowledge, and pushing each other to think and do better.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
There are many! One, having the last big Beaux Arts Ball parties in the old architecture building before the renovation. Ralph Rapson and previous deans were there waxing poetic about parties there in the 60's, and we "shut the building down." Our class was displaced in four buildings around campus, and our adoption and adaptation of these old classroom spaces in these buildings made for a memorable time. Our temporary locations also made it easier to get questionable Chinese take-out food in Dinkytown before almost every studio.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
My studio projects, and especially the drawing projects, were all quite memorable and valuable. But the most valuable project for me and the one I still think about often was my Honor's Thesis Project, which in most respects was a complete disaster in its effort to approach something so broad with such shallow focus. This failure was a valuable tool for me and the lessons learned are something I continually use as I approach a design project or idea in order to achieve clarity, depth, purpose, and intent.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Most influential to me was drawing, more specifically a technical means of drawing and diagramming taught by Adams and Gilpin. Although I draw or diagram now quickly to communicate ideas to a client or design team, the precision and understanding of drawing as an architectural construct, a way to communicate, an artful medium, and a means to show a great underlying depth in thinking, provided a strong method that could be applied to any idea and transcend any preference of "style" being taught at a certain time.

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
That is still in process and I would argue that instead of being specific about the impact, I would say that the education and base provided me only a positive impact and betterment of our environments, as it's our charge in society as architects and designers to better what I know best; the spaces our community, city, nation, and world inhabit. Every design project I approach with the goal to invest as much thought, strength quality, foresight, radicalness, and skillfulness into its outcome to advance architectural ideas. My education and experience in its totality has instilled these drives and continually inspires me today.

University of Minnesota - B.A. Arch '00, M.Arch '02

What was the most important thing/skill/concept you learned at the School of Architecture?
How to think conceptually and outside the box, and then apply to in-the-box design problems.

Who made the most lasting impression (most influenced you) and why?
Greg Watson - You learn more from your failures than you do from your successes, and often the solution exists in your previous attempts.

What is your favorite memory from your studio days?
The studio culture.

Please identify one (or more) memorable design project that you worked on while a student at the School of Architecture.
The Music Education building, which was my M.Arch thesis project.

What major forces (such as individual architects, design philosophies, rendering styles, research methods, etc.) do you remember influencing you significantly as a student?
Lance Lavine for introducing me to phenomenology; Ali Hesmati for how to physically model and manipulate space; Greg Watson for teaching how to design and the importance of using different media in creative thinking; Steve Weeks stating that building materials and details do matter; and Bob Mack for historic preservation and its role in a "modernist" society.

Cite an example (be specific) that illustrates how you used the education you received at the School of Architecture to positively impact (or better) your community, city, nation or the world.
My career focuses on historic preservation and the sustainable reuse of existing buildings and structures. My work reflects the core values I began fostering while at the University of Minnesota. Reuse solutions are often subtle, requiring creative thinking and a blending of past building techniques and modern technology.