Jenny Parker Helps Design The 1968 Exhibit at the Minnesota History Center


for blog 1.jpg During her first semester at the College of Design, Jenny Parker (graphic design, museum studies) took a special topics course called Exhibit Design with Lonnie Broden. The class worked with the Minnesota History Center on The 1968 Exhibit (open now through February 20th), which looks at how the experiences of 1968 fueled a persistent, if often contradictory, sense of identity for the people who experienced it.

When the semester ended, Parker approached the History Center about a summer internship. They brought her onto their team and she began working on a set of banners for the Homeplace Minnesota lobby. She worked as one of two graphic designers for the 1968 exhibit until it opened last October and continues to work with the History Center to prepare the exhibit for travel to Oakland, CA this spring. The exhibit will also travel to other locations around the country.


Her favorite pieces to design for the exhibit (pictured below) were a set of 15 icons, one for each month in 1968, and one for each of the three pop culture lounges. Parker also designed wall banners, graphics for the interactive pieces, and a set of television covers for the TV lounge area. She also chose and scanned many of the Life magazine ads scattered throughout the pop culture lounges.


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"Working on the 1968 Exhibit has been an amazing experience," says Parker. "The Exhibit Design class I took in 2008 was what inspired me to be a Museum Studies minor, and confirmed that I was and continue to be on the right path. . . I am doing exactly what I want to be doing, and have learned more in the past 4 years than I ever imagined possible."

Parker works as the Design Graduate Assistant for the Goldstein Museum. You can follow her on Twitter @Jenny_Parker. To learn more about the Museum Studies graduate minor or about the Graphic Design program, visit our website.

The 1968 Exhibit is free and open to the public Tuesdays, 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM at the Minnesota History Center.

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