Headstone for a Small Farm

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tombstone for a farmstead.JPG

There are gravestones made of wheat and here there are farmsteads marked with granite headstones. Tombstones to remember the once vital landscape.

This is the farmstead at the end of our section.

The Hansons erected this monument to their beloved. To a life well lived. I invite you to come visit this marker yourself. It shows a beautiful farmstead that I imagine with chickens, pigs, cows, small grains, a pasture, flowers, gardens, children. The windmill tower still stands. It is the most beautiful farm site-- right on a shallow lake. They probably saw waterfowl in the hundreds of thousands. I image they were happy, well fed, comfortable much of the time.

Was it a blip in time to have this American landscape populated with small farms? With self reliant, hard working folk? Is that all gone forever? Nothing remaining but old groves where barns and houses once stood. An occasional granite marker where the farmsteads and churches once stood.

I know a thing or two about grief-- and this is grief. One day last year I sat on the St. Paul campus in a group of faculty and rural community members. The metro faculty talking about how to confront all the encroaching growth and development. After 1/2 hour one of the rural people said "you talk about growth-- but we are just trying to stave off the grief at all the loss." The loss of our farms, farmers, children, neighbors. This county--Big Stone-- has lost 50% of its people in the last 30 years.

I'm not staving off grief. I never have. But we're certainly not ready to give up that dream of having more farms and farmers all around us. Did you hear MPR this morning? There are people who want to come back.-- to farm for a living.

I can show them some really nice farm sites....

sweet land scene.jpg

23 Comments

By golly, now I know Mike is Olaf Torvik and furthermore I recognize the geese flying overhead and I'm sure that's Zahrbock's or maybe Folkens' grove in the background in the bottom photo.

Dale,

I think I'll refer to Mike as Olaf from now on... We had a small film fest on our farm last week. All Sweet Land all the time-- different audiences. K

I like reading your words almost as much as I like listening to Alan Jacksons songs. How about that "KDJ", you've just been compared to "AJ".I'm trying to encourage the remaining "Remnant",with my words here, in hopes that someday maybe I can be one!! (and that Olaf you know,I think he might already be one!!)I'm betting there are all kinds of people out there that would like to live like you guys are. We just gotta figure a way out of this Corn-Bean-Feedlot Machine

nice share, thank you

Nice blog, I'd like to send this on to a couple of friends if that's ok?

Amazing concept provoking article, My spouse and i liked reading this today.

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It is true that what is discussed there, but sometimes still need some more data-specific data as supporting a truth.

This was a great read although a few points were better than others. Do you mind if i re-tweet? Awesome Read.

Thank you for a great post

are you flossing his teeth at night or using a flouride rinse, both of those will help prevent them.

I saw combines when i used to live in southern illinois. Great post though!

Apple now has Rhapsody as an app, which is a great start, but it is currently hampered by the inability to store locally on your iPod, and has a dismal 64kbps bit rate. If this changes, then it will somewhat negate this advantage for the Zune, but the 10 songs per month will still be a big plus in Zune Pass' favor.

Growth and development are part and parcel of civilization. I wish there were ways we could keep some of the unique and timeless ways of living so that we never forget our past. Still, unless there is a radical change in the way of thinking, expanding urbanization and development isn't going away.
Still, one can hope, right?

Old Mc Donald had a farm e i e o! I love to sing this song and I really love farm animals, been working in the farm when I was a kid, I tend cows, goats and pigs, I cultivate garden plot and plant veggies too, those were the days

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I dream of having a small farm of my own with farm animals and orchards in it, great post!

I really don't know if globalization and technological advancement is a bad thing. Well, on one hand you could say it wipes out nature or stuff like farms and things that you really would like to keep, imagine what life would be like without technology. I mean, no lights? no computers? no hand phones? our economy will come to a standstill! food for thought.

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our farms are passed by generations to generations too, it gives living for our ancestors and to us for centuries

It's really important to think about our roots and how we all got to where we are today. Sometimes it's very soothing to think about simpler ways of life. The work was hard, but the life was very good.

Good blog, all around us is changing but we should always be proud of our past

I grew up on a farm on the east coast of Canada and am happy to see that those farming communities are still thriving after being passed down. Sad to say that it's not the same everywhere.

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This page contains a single entry by Kathryn Draeger published on March 27, 2008 1:07 PM.

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