Small Enough to Care About (as opposed to Too Big to Fail)

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small enough to care about Odessa.jpg
Odessa, Minnesota- photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Small Enough to Care About.

There is a scale at which it is possible to make an impact. A scale at which ideas, thoughts, and actions can turn into something changed, good, and tangible. Like our farm- we're going to put a chunk of it into pasture to raise grassfed livestock. The change and good I seek is 1) Meadowlarks return to our corner of the prairie 2) the winter snows won't be covered with black dirt from the blowing soil. (oh and more romatic ideas of flying kites, chasing kids, and watching cows chew their cud in verdant fields)

In small communities it is possible to work together, build a new idea, and see it come to fruition. We have a local food group forming in the county and there are steps forward. I hear a community garden may be planted on a vacant mainstreet lot. Now that is Change You Can Believe In.

What I like about where I lives is that it is small enough to care about.
As for those too big to fail? Somehow I think we will be just fine without them.

7 Comments

Amen; You know, when you look at all this,can't you almost see this thing: a big screen thats separating the ones who car about things and the ones who don't? Our economy now is starting to reveal those that have been living off our system by cheating and lieing, pollution is finally been recognized as a source of many of our problems,and maybe - just maybe we've decided that real food doesn't necessarly come from a grocery store. I'll call this a pseudo-judgement day(this economy and the world we live in right know).those that fall thru the screen will have the right to continue on.(cause we're down to earth?)Oh boy!!

Amen; You know, when you look at all this,can't you almost see this thing: a big screen thats separating the ones who care about things and the ones who don't? Our economy now is starting to reveal those that have been living off our system by cheating and lieing, pollution is finally been recognized as a source of many of our problems,and maybe - just maybe we've decided that real food doesn't necessarly come from a grocery store. I'll call this a pseudo-judgement day(this economy and the world we live in right know).those that fall thru this screen will have the right to continue on.(cause we're down to earth?)Oh boy!!

OOPS

You know Evan-- I think your idea about the pseudo-judgement day is spot on.

What makes me really crabby is all the Powers That Be protecting those wall street banksters from facing judgement. Heck- they don't even have to show us what is in their books to receive their TARP money.

I remember working up in the Red River Valley and there was this old Scandanavian farmer who had the really thick Minnesota accent. He kept saying "der vill be blood in the streets! Blood in the streets!" Wonder what he is saying now.

I'm excited about the pasture and cattle and meadowlarks! It has been awhile since I heard a meadowlark call! About the silence you referred to earlier...yes, I have had that experience, too. Guess it was a condition we accepted as fairly normal when we grew up on the farm. Later, after becoming a "town person", I recall a time when I went on ahead of others while on a hike in the mountains. I found myself alone, suddenly standing still, witness to a sunlit meadow surrounded by pines..silent except for the slight whisper of the breeze in the trees. It was soul-stirring...a spell broken too soon when my companions caught up with me.
Have you read Sigurd Olson? I just thought of his title "The Singing Wilderness". Have always wanted to read that and other of his books...glad it came to me as a result of your blog.
And..love the serendipity...just recently reread a couple of pages I'd marked in "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency".. not a particular favorite of mine, really, but most books have something I want to return to. She speaks of her country..."Just a short distance to the west lay the Kalahari, a hinterland of ochre that stretched off, for unimaginable miles, to the singing emptiness of the Namib." Isn't that a lovely passage? Love to all.. Carolyn

Please add Killdeer and Pheasants to your list..possibly Bluebirds as well, but you will need a fence post or more as they perch, keeping an eye for food on the ground around them. Also, all the big and little critters of the field.. I remember following soft dusty cow paths with my bare feet as a youngster. What wonderful memories.
I heard lots of stories about the 'Dirty Thirdies', from my parents, and know too, that the rest of us in the family tree have heard how tough it was to begin farming during the depression. But we survived and always had food on the table.. if we were poor we didn't realize it... just normal for us! Bev

Don't ya just love that the center of this town is a baseball diamond? I remember flying out of some midwestern city and seeing all these baseball fields scattered all over the landscape. I like that.

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This page contains a single entry by Kathryn Draeger published on February 5, 2009 5:49 AM.

An Unheard of Silence was the previous entry in this blog.

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