Turkey Love

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IMG_1143.JPG
Our turkey protecting the drying laundry from flies (i.e. eating the flies that were attracted to warm clothes on a cool autumn day)

We raised our first turkey this year and it was heart breaking. The baby turkey came to us under suspicious circumstances, tucked under a drunk man's jacket. Let's just leave it at that.

We put the turkey in with our spring chickens- the ones destined to be butchered in 9 weeks as fryers. He grew at about the same rate and then began to tower over his flock-mates. As he did, he became extremely protective of the flock. And then the 9 weeks were up and Flock 1 went to where all good chickens go... Ashby Minnesota. Ashby has the nearest USDA inspected poultry processing for small farmers like us. (Note: we make the 120 mile round trip twice- to drop off and then pick up our birds).

When the Flock 1 was sent to Ashby, the turkey was at a complete loss. We put him in with our laying hens, but he would run back the quarter mile to where the flock had been pastured. He wandered around gobbling and searching our back yard for his lost flock. He was inconsolable for about a week. The windows were open to let in the summer breezes and he would walk back and forth beneath the dining room window mourning for his lost flock.

So we put him in with Flock 2- which he mightily towered over. And he became their guard and protector. Standing between the flock and any dog or human who came near. Not threatening or mean-- just using his body as a barrier. When the hawk perched nearby to eye the chickens, the turkey jumped on top of a waterer and spread his big wings over the birds.

We really came to enjoy that turkey. He'd make his way around the farmyard checking things out. Including us. I've never raised a turkey before, but this was an interesting creature who was protective and cared for his fellow birds.

And then this week the temperature dropped to zero and the winds howled and snow blew horizontally across the prairie. The Ashby guys had delayed processing our birds by a week (they're doing big business there these days) and so we found ourselves in a chicken crisis -- having to move our birds from their fall pasture into the barn. Mike and I carried- 6 at a time- nearly 100 bird to the barn. The turkey watched over the last few birds huddled under him. We carried him into the barn last.

He was a beautiful bird. That picture doesn't do him justice. In his final days his lovely white feathers fanned out and he was majestic and calm.

May we all be grateful this Thanksgiving for the many gifts that come to us in such an array of splendor and humble beginnings and endings.

For all thy gifts of every kind
We offer praise with quiet mind
Be with us Lord and guide our ways
Around the circle of our days

`Reeves Lindbergh` full text under extended entry - click below

Happy Thanksgiving.

The Circle of Days

Lord, we offer thanks and praise
For the circle of our days.

Praise for radiant brother sun
Who makes the hours around us run.

For sister moon, and for the stars,
Brilliant, precious, always ours.

Praise for brothers wind and air,
Serene or cloudy, foul or fair.

For sister water, clear and chaste,
Useful, humble, good to taste.

For fire, our brother, strong and bright,
Whose joy illuminates the night.

Praise for our sister, mother earth,
Who cares for each of us from birth.

For all her children, fierce or mild,
For sister, brother, parent, child.

For creatures wild and creatures tame,
For hunter, hunted, both the same.

For brother sleep, and sister death,
Who tend the borders of our breath.

For desert, orchard, rock, and tree,
For forest, meadow, mountain, sea,

For fruit and flower, plant and bush,
For morning robin, evening thrush.

For all your gifts, of every kind,
We offer praise with quiet mind.

Be with us, Lord, and guide our ways
Around the circle of our days.

Reeve Lindbergh, based on
Canticle of the Sun, St. Francis of Assisi

6 Comments

don't tell me your gonna eat him?

I have been looking for the perfect verse for around the kitchen soffit and I just found it on your post. Thank you! We won't talk about the turkey.

Hey Becky-- I found a typo in that prayer. It should be for all "thy" gifts, not "they" gift. Hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving. And Kell-- so sorry you and Jason won't be able to be here this year.

Thanksgiving day blessings to all of you. So good to enjoy the food and everything else this day was set aside for. (would that include football?) Our day will be minus some very important items, sems our 40+ year old freezer decided to stop running. With it we lost evrything we'd put up this year from our garden. We'd just cleaned out some carry over items from 2 years ago too, so every thing was fresh. Disgusting when you think of all the ground work ,weeding, picking and then preping for the freezer. Making Sauerkraut makes perfect sence now, it almost takes care of itself!
Had a very good fall so " Life is Good"

Becky and Carolyn,

I found the source of the prayer above. It's Reeve Lindbergh-- daughter of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. I've met her and didn't realize this was one of her poems/prayers. Here's the full version:

The Circle of Days
Lord, we offer thanks and praise
For the circle of our days.
Praise for radiant brother sun
Who makes the hours around us run.
For sister moon, and for the stars,
Brilliant, precious, always ours.
Praise for brothers wind and air,
Serene or cloudy, foul or fair.
For sister water, clear and chaste,
Useful, humble, good to taste.
For fire, our brother, strong and bright,
Whose joy illuminates the night.
Praise for our sister, mother earth,
Who cares for each of us from birth.
For all her children, fierce or mild,
For sister, brother, parent, child.
For creatures wild and creatures tame,
For hunter, hunted, both the same.
For brother sleep, and sister death,
Who tend the borders of our breath.
For desert, orchard, rock, and tree,
For forest, meadow, mountain, sea,
For fruit and flower, plant and bush,
For morning robin, evening thrush.
For all your gifts, of every kind,
We offer praise with quiet mind.
Be with us, Lord, and guide our ways
Around the circle of our days.

Reeve Lindbergh, based on
Canticle of the Sun, St. Francis of Assisi

No, really did you eat him? Just kidding. Better to grace your table than the jaws of a coyote. I could use a couple of chickens if you have any extra. Merry Christmas!

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Kathryn Draeger published on November 22, 2011 5:38 AM.

Farming with Nature-- or-- the Seemingly Senseless Slaughter of Chickens was the previous entry in this blog.

A Hymn Sing for the Season of Peace is the next entry in this blog.

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