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By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator in Crops

Does glyphosate perform as well today as it did when you first used it?  When producers were asked this question at University of Minnesota Private Pesticide Applicator Training sessions across southern Minnesota in 2014, 87% of the respondents said "No".  This percentage is up significantly from 2009, when 55% of respondents answered "No" to this question.  Increasing issues with resistance to glyphosate is likely, at least in part, behind reported reductions in weed control.  To address issues of reduced weed control with glyphosate, diversification is key. 

Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary April 3, 2014

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by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929

This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on April 3, 2014.

Here are the reports:

April 3 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold are sorted and averaged by type and quality.

History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV.

As noted before, think carefully about averages.

The graphs might show a little up-turn in the market as we sometimes do in the spring as on-farm supplies run lower and first crop hay harvest is a ways off yet. You can do your own thinking about that. It was a wintery weather day on April 3 as you headed east from Sauk Center to the Wisconsin border.

MARKET REPORTS

"Weekly Hay Market Demand and Price Report for the Upper Midwest" that is put together by Ken Barnett, UW Extension.

http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/pubs/hay_market_report.htm

USDA Hay Market Reports - Click on Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News, then look for Hay.

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs

By Lizabeth Stahl and Lisa Behnken, Extension Educators in Crops

University of Minnesota Extension has recently launched a U of MN Extension Crops YouTube video site. It can be accessed through the newly updated U of MN Extension Crops webpage at www.extension.umn.edu/crops under "Social Media".

Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary March 20, 2014

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by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties, marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929

This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on March 20, 2014.

Here are the reports:

March 20 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold are sorted and averaged by type and quality.

History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdfA summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV.

Please note that there was only ONE load of "Medium" Square Alfalfa in the 176-200 RFV group and it sold for $260/T. There were 4 loads of "Large" Square Alfalfa in the 176-200 RFV group that averaged $221, ranging from $210 to 230. So you can think about whether that weighs into how you think about the $260 price on the line graph. As noted before, think carefully about averages.

There were 2 small loads of small square bales of straw that sold for $3.50 and $3.75 per bale for 52 and 106 bales. Will it be a better year for small grain where the snow is melted and we might be able to plant small grain earlier than last year?

 MARKET REPORTS

"Weekly Hay Market Demand and Price Report for the Upper Midwest" that is put together by Ken Barnett, UW Extension.

http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/pubs/hay_market_report.htm

 USDA Hay Market Reports - Click on Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News, then look for Hay.

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs



M. Scott Wells - Extension Forage and Cropping Systems Agronomist

We are excited to announce that our University of Minnesota Forage website has emerged from its complete rebuild. Visitors to the U of M Forage website will be able to successfully navigate with ease through a host of informative topics associated with forage production such as:

  • Variety Selection and Genetics
  • Soil and Water Management
  • Establishment
  • Nutrient Management
  • Growth and Development
  • Utilization and Management
  • Organic Production
  • Along with finding a wealth of information associated with forage production, visitors will have their attention drawn to upcoming U of M Extension and other statewide events across all crops via the Crops Calendar. The Crops Calendar offers a portal to more than scheduled events; with a quick click of the mouse, visitors can access valuable information associated with the chosen event including:
  • Event Flyers
  • Registration Forms
  • Maps and Locations
  • Event Coordinator(s) Contact Information
  • Visitors to the U of M Forage website will also find up to date information and news via the Minnesota Crop News Blog. The Crop News Blog is an excellent resource highlighting current and relevant news, research findings, and other valuable resources across all cropping systems at the U of M.

    The primary goal and objective of the U of M Forage website rebuild is to collect and organize the information in a logical and efficient way so that you, the visitor, can easily navigate and browse the information relative to your interest.

    Come take a look: http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/forages/

    A reminder that key forage production and management issues in Minnesota will be presented at a series of University of Minnesota Extension Forage Workshops which will be held this week. Individual sites include Fergus Falls on March 26th in the AgCountry Farm Credit Service Building, St. Charles on March 27th at the St. Charles City Hall, and Kingston on March 28 at the Kingston Community Center.  The forage workshop agendas and times for each location can be accessed at the following internet site: z.umn.edu/foragesforu  This program targets management information for producers and Ag professionals.  


    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929

    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on March 6, 2014. The next Sauk Centre auction is on March 20. There is an auction in Litchfield on March 25

    Here are the reports:

    Mar 6 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted and averaged by type and q

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Where sale lots are limited, averages might not mean much.

    Forages for U Brochure 2014.pdf  Workshops, March 26-28, Fergus Falls, St. Charles, Kingston. A news release is posted below on the webpage also. 

     MARKET REPORTS

    "Weekly Hay Market Demand and Price Report for the Upper Midwest" that is put together by Ken Barnett, UW Extension.

    http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/pubs/hay_market_report.htm

    USDA Hay Market Reports - Click on Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News, then look for Hay.

    http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs

     

    David Nicolai, Extension Educator-Crops

    To address key forage production and management issues in Minnesota, a series of Forage Workshops will be held the week of March 24th. Individual sites include Fergus Falls on March 26th in the AgCountry Farm Credit Service Building, St. Charles on March 27th at the St. Charles City Hall, and Kingston on March 28 at the Kingston Community Center.  This program is developed by the University of Minnesota Extension and is aimed at current issues and research in forage production and management with the intent to increase producers's forage production and farm profitability.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Feb 20, 2014

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929


    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Feb 20, 2014.

    Another LARGE sale. Consider Averages Carefully. Check example in Large Round Grass Hay Protein greater than 13% and Large Round Grass 9-13%.

    Here are the reports:

    Feb 20 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted and averaged by type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Where sale lots are limited, averages might not mean much.

    Hay Prod US 1919 to2013.pdf

    1.   What year had the largest harvested hay acres since 1919?

    2.     What year had the smallest harvested hay acres since 1919?

    3.     What year has the largest harvested alfalfa production since 1919?

    4.     What year had the smallest harvested alfalfa and other hay production since 1919?

    5.     What does RCAU stand for related to hay production?

    I'll give you that one: "Roughage Consuming Animal Units"

     MARKET REPORTS

    "Weekly Hay Market Demand and Price Report for the Upper Midwest" that is put together by Ken Barnett, UW Extension.

    http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/pubs/hay_market_report.htm

     USDA Hay Market Reports - Click on Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News, then look for Hay.

    http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs

    Predicting the future: Alfalfa winter injury in Minnesota

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    by M. Scott Wells
    mswells@umn.edu

    Over the past two and half months as the new U of MN Forage and Cropping System Extension Agronomist, the one question I have been asked the most is, "Are you surviving the winter?" Being from the southern US, I replied that I have now experienced real winter. Some of these experiences have been novel and interesting, such as tossing boiling water into the air and watching it become snow, and blowing bubbles in -15°F weather (if you not have tried the bubbles, I highly recommend it), whereas other experiences (truck not starting because its so cold) have been less thrilling.

    This question about "surviving the winter" is an important one when considering the devastating impact of the 2012-2013 winter on alfalfa stands throughout Minnesota. If you are an Alfalfa producer, the question of alfalfa winter injury, and to a greater extent winterkill, is definitely on your mind as it is on mine.

    Winter injury and winterkill of Alfalfa can be tricky to predict during an average winter where adequate snow cover (4 to 6 inches) persists throughout the season. However, this winter as been anything but "average" and with headlines such as: "Out of the blizzard, into the icebox; low temperature records may be shattered" (NBC News 1/4/2014); "Deep Freeze Recap: Coldest Temperatures of the Century for Some" (The Weather Channel 1/10/2014); "More frigid cold prompts Minnesota schools to cancel Thursday classes" (StarTribune 1/23/2014), and my personal favorite, "Minnesota weather remains frigid as heat wave hits Alaska" (KARE 11 News 1/28/2014); the question arises, how likely is winter injury and winterkill in Alfalfa this winter?

    As mentioned above, severe cold temperatures measured at the alfalfa crown from 15 and 5°F and below can cause damage, and during prolonged exposure, kill the plant. Even if the plants are not killed, the full extent of the damage is not until the plants reach 6 inches of spring growth (early May).

    Snow cover is essential in preventing soil temperatures from falling into the ranges where alfalfa is susceptible to winter injury and winterkill. Notice for both 2013 and 2014 how air temperatures dropped below the 5°F (e.g. bold black line, Figure 1), but what is more important than the air temperature is the temperature observed at the crown. In 2013 soil temperatures (e.g. 2-inches) were at or below 15°F (e.g. range for winter injury) for the months of January and February, and even worse, soil temperatures were measured below 5°F (Figure 1, black arrows). Even though the air temperatures were less severe than those experienced this year, the increased snow cover in 2014 has insulated the soil, preventing extreme changes in soil temperature, thus reducing the likelihood of alfalfa winter injury. Soil temperature at a 2 inch depth has mostly been above 20 F with periods where it reached near 16 F when air temperatures reached near-22°F. This illustrates the importance of managing alfalfa stands to increase snow cover retention.

    weatherfigf.jpg
    Figure 1. Temperature and snow depth for Waseca Experiment Station during the winters of 2013 and 2014. *Critical temperature threshold for alfalfa winter injury and winterkill. **Minimum snow depth to buffer and insulate soil temperature from extreme air temperatures.

    For the remainder of the winter and even into early spring, we need to watch out for alternative freeze and thaw cycles. These cycles can adversely affect alfalfa in several ways. (i) As the snow melts and refreezes, ice sheets can form. These ice sheets reduce the insulation factor of the remaining snow, thereby lowering the soil temperature at the crown, and much like the freezer bags use to keep your meat from spoiling in the freezer, the ice sheet restrict the diffusion of oxygen to the roots. The lower diffusion rates of oxygen to the roots, combined with the increased levels of carbon dioxide respiring from the roots, creates an anoxic zone (think low oxygen). (ii) The freeze-thaw cycles of the soil can physically lift alfalfa plants out of the soil via heaving. The heaved alfalfa crown is increasingly exposed to the elements and is more susceptible to winter injury. In extreme cases, alfalfa lateral roots can become severed, reducing the winter survivability and spring productivity. Typically heaving is more of an issue in wet, saturated soils, and less of an issue in well drained soils. (iii) Temperatures above 40°F can cause alfalfa buds to break dormancy. Once dormancy is broken, buds are much more susceptible to freezing damage. Plants with dead buds grow unevenly and slowly in the spring.

    We cannot control the weather, or predict how severe the winter will be, as production decisions are made the prior year. However, we do possess tools to help decrease the incidences of winter injury, and many of these tools and management strategies are placed in motion long before the winter. These controllable management strategies include:

    • Selecting varieties with greater winter hardiness and disease resistance. For detailed descriptions of variety, disease resistance, and winter hardiness, see Minnesota Variety Trial Results 2012.
    • Managing younger stands. Stand age is important since older stands are more exposed to cumulative stressors of plant diseases and physical injury than younger stands, resulting in reduced winter survivability in the older stands.
    • Soil K Level. Soil potassium (potash) is very important in enhancing alfalfa tolerance to winter injury. Management of soil nutrients Phosphorus, Boron, and Sulfur along with pH (<6.5) is critical to ensure winter survivability.
    • Soil drainage is important from both a disease management and ice sheeting point of view.
    • Harvest management combined with the above management strategies provide producers with increased control over winter survivability. More frequent cutting will normally cause more plant stress (reduction in root reserves).
      • In general, three cuts are less risky than four-cuts in southern Minnesota. The last harvest in the three-cut system must occur before September 1st. By doing so, the Alfalfa has enough time to regrow and accumulate carbohydrate reserves in concert with undergoing the normal fall dormancy changes.
      • When considering four-cut systems, delaying the last cut until October 15th instead of September 15th, can reduce the likelihood of winter injury since there is minimal chance of reducing root reserves through fall regrowth.
    • Stubble height management from un-harvested plant residue insulates the soil, catches snow for insulation, and by shading the soil surface from sunlight can minimize freezing and thawing cycles.
    Given the complex interactions, both climate-related and cultural, it is difficult to assess the degree of winter injury in Alfalfa. However, with the amount of snow-cover throughout the state, currently I think the risk for winterkill is minimal, but only time will tell.

    by David Nicolai, Extension Educator-Crops

    To help address key management issues of Northwestern and West Central Minnesota producers, Barriers to Bushels will be held at five locations in late February and early March. This is a program developed by University of Minnesota Extension aimed at current issues and research in corn/soybean crop production with the intent to ultimately help increase a producer's margins. Topics include: Managing Cost of Production (Bret Oelke), Key Soybean and Corn Diseases (Dr. Dean Malvick), Managing Inputs for High Yields While Controlling Costs in Corn Production (Dr. Jeff Coulter), Managing Herbicide Resistant Weeds (Dr. Jeff Gunsolus), Management Strategies for Avoiding SCN Pitfalls (Dr. Phil Glogoza), Optimizing Pop-up and Starter Fertilizers in Corn (Dr. Dan Kaiser), Insect Management Philosophy (Bruce Potter), and High Cost Management and Return in Soybeans (Dr. Seth Naeve).

    Program Announcement: 2014 Southern Wheat Tour

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    With increasing spring and fall workloads and problematic pests problems, including herbicide resistant weeds, wheat offers opportunities to diversity the cropping systems in southern Minnesota and manage these challenges cost effectively. The first objective of this program is to help farmers determine if wheat will work on their farm, in their rotation, and if it can be profitable. The second objective is to hand farmers the tools needed to make wheat a successful crop on their operation. This includes information on production agronomics, variety selection, disease identification and fungicide use, fertility, quality, and economics. Time will be set aside for open forum to discuss related topics and on farm experiences.

    Dates, Locations, Times and Contacts are as follows:
    February 25 - Slayton, Pizza Ranch, 1:00 - 4:00 (Contact: Liz Stahl at 507-372-3900 or Mike Boersma at 507-825-6715).

    March 5 - Benson, McKinney's, 1:00 - 4:00 (Contact: Scott Lee at 320-760-6129 or Doug Holen at 320-589-1711)

    March 6 - LeCenter, Fairground 4H Building, 12:30 - 4:00 (Contacts: Diane at 507-357-8230 or Doug Holen at 320-589-1711).

    Presenters at all locations will include Jochum Wiersma, University of Minnesota Extension Small Grain Specialists, and Doug Holen, University of Minnesota Extension Small Grain Educator.

    For more information or brochure contact Doug Holen.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Feb 6, 2014

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929


    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Feb 6, 2014.

     

    This was a huge sale with 189 "loads" sold for tested hay and "bedding" materials.

    Consider averages carefully... see further reading.

    Information Links:

    Feb 6 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted and averaged by type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf  A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Where sale lots are limited, averages might not mean much.

    Hay Stocks Dec 1 2013.pdf   This lists May 1 and December 1 Hay Inventory for the 48 states starting May 1, 2011. The % column is the % compared to the corresponding date the previous year. I also list the combined numbers for our 5 state area.

    by David Nicolai, Coordinator for the Institute for Ag Professionals

    The University of Minnesota Institute for Ag Professionals is holding an Ag Research Update on Thursday, Feb 13th which was re-scheduled due to a snow storm in January.  Another agronomy training opportunity is the Conservation Tillage Conference set for February 18-19 in St. Cloud. And finally the University of Minnesota is working with the Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council (AFREC) to determine the need and opportunities for on-farm research in Minnesota. Your input is requested to determine if an on-farm research program should go ahead, and if so, what it should look like. The survey is described in this Crop-E news edition.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Jan 16, 2014

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    marte011@umn.edu by phone, if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929

    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Jan.16, 2014.

    Consider averages carefully when they are based on a limited number of entries, or wide range of numbers. In this summary, I wouldn't consider the average of 2 loads of Medium Square Alfalfa RFV 101-125 to mean much.  

    Jan 16 2014 Hay Auction.pdf Individual lots sold, sorted and averaged by type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions so far this year.  

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 2014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Where sale lots are limited, averages might not mean much.

    Central MN Winter Forage Workshop Feb 5 at the American Legion in Royalton; at Floodwood Feb 4; at Caledonia Feb 6. Marvin Hall, Penn State Extension Forage Specialist is guest speaker.

    Early Registration Discount extended to January 29. "With unpredictable weather and water pipes, please attend if you just get up and the day looks like it will work- always welcome."

    Read more for related information and info about coming events

    The Southwest Research and Outreach Center (SWROC) in
    Lamberton, MN will host Winter Crops and Soils Day Tuesday, February 4 at
    Blue Mound Banquet & Meeting Center in Luverne; Wednesday, February 5 at the
    SWROC in Lamberton; and Thursday, February 6 at the American Legion in
    Granite Falls.

    Winter Crops and Soils Day is a public event highlighting
    current research that is specific to southwestern
    Minnesota.

    The program will address a variety of current agricultural production
    challenges facing producers. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. with the
    workshop running from 9:30 to 2:30.

    Topics include water and fertility management, planting strategies to increase corn profitability, corn and soybean profitability on rented ground, insect and weed management and, of course, the weather and climate. Speakers, depending on location are: Dave Bau, Dr. Jeff Coulter, Tom Hoverstad, Dr. Paulo Pagliari, Dr. Mark Seely,
    Dr. Jeff Strock, Dr. Kelley Tilmon and Dr. Dennis Todey.

    SWROC's Winter Crops and Soils Day is open to the public. The event's $25
    registration fee covers handouts and lunch. Pre-registration is required.
    Continuing education units for certified crop advisers will be provided in
    the areas of Soil and Water (0.5 CEUs), Pest Management (1.0 CEUs),
    Professional Development (0.5 CEUs), Nutrient Management (0.5 CEUs) and Crop
    Management (1.0 CEUs).

    For further information on Winter Crops and Soils Day, please visit the
    SWROC's website at http://swroc.cfans.umn.edu or call the SWROC at
    507-752-7372.

    U of M Extension Crop Events Calendar Available Online

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    University of Minnesota Extension has published a Crop Events calendar on Extension's main Crops webpage. Up-to-date information on Private Pesticide Applicator Recertification workshops, conferences and other crops programs are included on this statewide event calendar. For a look at the wide variety of timely, research-based Extension events that are being offered, visit http://z.umn.edu/crops and look for "Upcoming Events."

    The University of Minnesota's Institute for Ag Professionals made the decision to postpone the Research Update workshop in Crookston due to blizzard conditions on January 16, 2014. The team has selected an alternate date of Thursday, February 13, 2014 to hold this workshop. The workshop will still take place at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center at 2900 University Avenue in Crookston from 12:30 pm to 4:40 pm. Please see below for additional information and online registration.


    By: Mike Boersma, Extension Educator, Murray and Pipestone counties


    The University of Minnesota Winter Crops Day and Small Grains Program is a great opportunity to hear the latest University-based research and information about corn, soybean, and small grain production. Whether you are a producer or an Ag professional who works with producers, this program is sure to provide relevant and practical information to help you be successful. The morning will focus on various aspects of corn and soybean production while the afternoon will focus on small grain production in southern Minnesota. The program will be held at the Slayton Pizza Ranch on Tuesday, February 25th. Registration will begin at 8:30 am, with the program running from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Dec 19, Jan 2, 2014

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    marte011@umn.edu by phone if a local call to Foley 968-5077 or 1-800-964-4929

    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Dec. 19, 2013 and Jan. 2, 2014.

    Consider averages carefully when they are based on a limited number of entries, or wide range of numbers. NOTE the two averages calculated for Large Round Alfalfa 126 to 150 RFV for the December 19 sale - with and without Lot 972.

    Dec 19 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted and averaged by type and quality.

    Jan 2 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions this year.  

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 20014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Where sale lots are limited, lines might not mean much.

    Regional Forage Workshops: At Floodwood Feb 4; Royalton in Central MN Feb 5 Caledonia Feb 6. The program varies some for each site. More infomation below. Flyers and registration available within the next couple of days. Keynote Speaker: Marvin Hall, Penn State

    Read more for related information and info about coming events

    2014 Extension Drainage Design Workshops

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    The annual Extension Drainage Design Workshops will be held in four locations in 2014: January 29 - 30, SDSU Extension Regional Center, Sioux Falls, SD; February 11 - 12, North Dakota State College of Science, Wahpeton, ND; March 5 - 6, University of Minnesota - Crookston, Crookston, MN, and March 18 - 19, Holiday Inn, Owatonna, MN. The workshops are a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, North Dakota State University, and South Dakota State University Extension.

    The 2-day workshops start at 8:00 a.m. and end at 5:00 p.m. on day two. The workshops will focus on planning and design of agricultural tile drainage systems to meet both profitability and environmental objectives. The course content is taught in a hands-on manner with lots of discussion time.

    Each workshop is intended for those interested in a more complete understanding of the planning and design principles and practices for drainage and water table management systems, including: farmers, landowners, consultants, drainage contractors, government agency staff and water resource managers. Planning topics include legal aspects, basics of drainable soils, agronomic perspectives, doing your own tiling, land evaluation tools, wetlands, and conservation drainage concepts and techniques. The design topics begin with basic design considerations and progress through individual small team projects, with several hands-on problem-solving examples covering basic design and layout principles, water flow calculations, drain spacing, sizing, and grades. Design principles for lift stations and conservation drainage practices are also considered.

    Registration for the four workshops sessions is now available at: www.regonline.com/2014drainage The registration price is $225 (price goes up to $300 about 3 weeks before the start of each workshop), and each workshop is limited to about 65 participants. These workshops have typically filled quickly, so register early to guarantee a spot. Due to seating limitations, on-site registration will not be available on the day of the event. Detailed agendas and additional information will follow shortly and be posted to the registration site.

    For more information contact Brad Carlson at bcarlson@umn.edu, or visit www.drainageoutlet.umn.edu

    By Dave Nicolai, Coordinator for the Institute for Ag Professionals

    2014 January Research Updates for Ag Professionals

    Registration for the 2014 University of Minnesota Research Update for Ag Professionals is available on-line or by mail. The registration fee is $45 prior to December 31st and $50 after December 31st. The Research Updates will be held at Waseca (Jan 7), Kasson (Jan 8), Lamberton (Jan 9), Willmar (Jan 14), Morris (Jan 15) and Crookston (Jan 16). Registration will be available at the door at Noon; start time is at 12:30 pm. The program continues until 4:40 pm.


    Graduate students at the University of Minnesota have organized a first-annual event - Production Agriculture Symposium on Thursday, February 13, 2014 on the Saint Paul campus.  The theme for the 2014 event is Enhancing Cropping System Performance Under Increased Environmental Variability

    Sauk Center Hay Auction Summary Dec 5, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearn-Benton-Morrison Counties
    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Dec 5, 2013.

    Consider averages carefully when they are based on a limited number of entries, or wide range of numbers.

    Dec 5 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted by type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions this year, with some comparisons to 2012. 

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 20014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Yes, the second auctions in November and the first auctions in December in 2012 and 2013 landed on the same line.

    (Continue Reading)

    U of M Conservation Tillage Conference in St. Cloud, Feb 18-19

    How-to information, expert advice, practical tips

    By Jodi DeJong-Hughes, Extension Educator - Crops and Conservation Tillage Conference Coordinator

     

    Roll up your sleeves for some practical, hands-on information that will save you soil, time, fuel -- and money. Conservation tillage is the focus of the ninth annual University of Minnesota Extension Conservation Tillage Conference and trade show Feb. 17 and 18, at the Holiday Inn and Suites, St. Cloud, MN. This conference emphasizes proven farmer experience and applied science. Straight from the trenches, learn how heavier, colder soils aren't necessarily the challenge they're made out to be. And, what have long-time no-tillers and reduced-tillage farmers learned that could spare you the same lessons?

    2014 January Research Updates for Ag Professionals

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    By Dave Nicolai, Coordinator for the Institute for Ag Professionals

    Face the 2014 crop year armed with the latest University of Minnesota research. Each year brings new crop production challenges. As an agricultural professional, keeping up with these new issues is a top priority. At the 2014 University of Minnesota Research Update for Ag Professionals, you will find research-based strategies to deal with today's changing pests, diseases, varieties, and nutrient and environmental recommendations. Presentations and discussions at the update will allow you to visit with experienced university researchers and offer you the opportunity to visit with colleagues to discuss topics of interest to you in your region. You will leave with research-based knowledge and field-tested solutions that will help you in the field for the year 2014. Descriptions of the research update presentations can be viewed at the Institute for Ag Professionals web site.

    Sauk Center Hay Auction Summary Nov. 21, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearn-Benton-Morrison Counties
    This information is for the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Nov 21, 2013.

    Consider averages carefully when they are based on a limited number of entries, or wide range of numbers.

    Nov 21 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Individual lots sold, sorted by type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf A summary of past 4 years and individual auctions this year, with some comparisons to 2012. 

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf   A line graph of for average from each sale 2001 to 20014 for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 101 to 200 RFV.


    Corn Silage Trial Results Available

    Advance Corn Hybrid Selection with New Trial Results

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Nov. 7, 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Here's my summary of the Sauk Centre Hay Auction on Nov. 7, 2013.

    Lots sold are grouped here by bale type, kind of hay, alfalfa sorted in 25 RFV point groups, grass sorted based on protein. Straw and bedding materials are also listed.

    Averages are calculated where it seems appropriated. Look at averages carefully where there are a few loads in a group; and where there is a wide range in price.

    Nov 7 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf  

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf  Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV.

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    The Sauk Centre Hay Auction is held on the first and third Thursday of each month through May. The Steffes Hay Auction is held in Litchfield with fall dates on Nov. 26, Dec. 11.

    READ MORE FOR INFORMATION ABOUT

    -Other sources of Hay Market Information

    -Coming Events

    By David Nicolai, Coordinator, Institute for Ag Professionals


    The three-day Minnesota Crop Pest Management Short Course program starts Tuesday, December 10th with an Update for Technical Service Providers program 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM, Minnesota Crop Protection Retailers "Nutrients in the Environment and Agricultural Productivity Session" 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM, Pesticide Applicator Recertification: Category H -- Seed Treatment Session 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM. The Crop Pest Management Short Course Educational Sessions will begin on Wednesday, December 11th from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM and continue on Thursday, December 12th from 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM.


    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary October 17, 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting the results of auction held October 17, 2013. The next auction at Sauk Centre is on November 7. I appreciate the Mid-American Quality Tested Hay Auction and Stearns DHIA Lab for sharing information used here.

    Lots sold are grouped here by bale type, kind of hay, alfalfa sorted in 25 RFV point groups, grass sorted based on protein. Straw and bedding materials are also listed.

    Averages are calculated where it seems appropriated. Look at averages carefully where there are a few loads in a group; and where there is a wide range of price.

    Oct 17 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV. 

    Graph 2001 to 2014 SC Hay Auction.pdf  This is a graph of Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV points from 101 to 200.

    The Sauk Centre Hay Auction will be held on the first and third Thursday of each month through May. The Steffes Hay Auction is held in Litchfield with fall dates on November 12 & 26, December 11.

    Read more for information about
    -Straw and Bedding Materials in Short Supply?
    -Other sources of Hay Market Information
    -Coming Events

    John A. Lamb
    Nutrient Management Extension Specialist
    University of Minnesota

    Because of weather, a number of acres of the 2013 sugar beet crop will not be harvested.  It has been a number of years (PIK years) since this many acres have been left un-harvested.  At that time, SMBSC and the University of Minnesota did conduct a number of research studies to answer the main production question:  "What should I do with these fields for next year?" 

    By Daniel Kaiser
    Fabian Fernandez
    John Lamb
    Carl Rosen

    University of Minnesota Extension Nutrient Management Specialists

    The increase number of acres planted to cover crops has raised questions on nitrogen (N) crediting for the 2014 cropping year.  While there are many benefits touted for the use of cover crops, there are a lot of unknowns when determining N credits.  This is especially true for mixes with multiple plant species. 

    Dimethoate Use Survey

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    EPA is seeking feedback on the national usage and needs patterns for the insecticide Dimethoate. If this product is of use in your cropping systems, you may want to respond to this request for information. Below is the original request I received....


    Dear Colleagues,

    The registrant has requested our assistance in providing feedback on the use and needs for dimethoate. The information will be used for its ongoing Registration Review (see the following link).
    http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/registration_review/dimethoate/index.htm.

    The survey is available at:
    https://vce.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cUapAjAWYbbMCYR

    Survey responders can be: Grower; Independent Crop Advisor; Extension Agent; Extension Specialist; Research Scientist - University; Pesticide Regulator - State; Pesticide Regulator - Federal; Pesticide Retailer; R&D/Sales Specialist - Company; Research Scientist - Company; and Research Scientist - Federal.

    The survey will close on December 31 and the results will be provided to the registrant, EPA and the four regional IPM Centers and will be useful for the Focus Meeting planned for after December. An evaluation of the effectiveness of this online tool will be assessed afterwards. No additional surveys are being planned at this time.

    Many thanks to the Southern Region IPM Center and Virginia Tech for developing this online tool!

    If you have any questions or comments, please contact:

    Teung F. Chin, Ph.D.
    USDA ARS Office of Pest Management Policy
    1400 Indpendence Ave., S.W.
    Room 3871 (Mail Stop 0314)
    Washington DC, 20250
    (202) 222-8619 cell
    teung.chin@ars.usda.gov


    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary Oct 3, 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting the results of auction held October 3, 2013.

    Oct 3 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    Lots sold are grouped here by bale type, kind of hay, alfalfa sorted in 25 RFV point groups, grass sorted based on protein. Straw and bedding materials are also listed.

    Averages are calculated where it seems appropriated. Look at averages carefully where there are a few loads in a group; and where there is a wide range of price. I will update a line graph of auction results over the years when we get results from the October 17 auction sometime next week.

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf  Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV.

    The Sauk Centre Hay Auction will be held on the first and third Thursday of each month through May. The Steffes Hay Auction is held in Litchfield with fall dates so far on October 22 and November 12 & 26, December 11.

    Read more for information about

    -Prussic acid from Frost Damaged Sorghum and Sudangrass Crops

    -Cover Crop Field Event in Stearns County October 30

    -Other sources of Hay Market Information

    By Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Nutrient Management Specialist


    The increased number of corn acres managed with prevented planting in 2013 has resulted in numerous questions about management in 2014.  One major question that arises is the effect of fallow syndrome.  Fallow syndrome is a result of reduced colonization of plant roots by vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae (abbreviated VAM).  Since VAM are important in the uptake of elements such as phosphorus and zinc, questions arise as to proper management for the following years crops.  However, fallow syndrome does not affect all crops nor will it likely be an issue for all prevented planting acres

    Stearns County Cover Crop Field Day

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    By Jodi DeJong-Hughes

    cover-crop-field-day-10-13.jpg

    Aerial seeding of cereal rye cover crop into soybeans and standing corn. Photo by USDA-NRCS on September 11, 2013.

    Stearns County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) is partnering with the University of Minnesota Extension to bring you a captivating Cover Crop Field Day on Wednesday, October 30 at 1:00 p.m. near Roscoe.

    Cover crops are a great tool growers can utilize to protect and enhance their most valuable resource--productive soil. This is a unique opportunity to learn about the benefits and challenges of cover crops. You will learn about six different cover crop cocktail mixes and four different seeding methods of cereal rye. A soil pit will offer a rare look into soil structure and root growth. Experienced soil and cover crop experts will discuss cover crop species, benefits, and seeding rates (Shannon Osborne, ARS and Jill Sackett, UMN Extension), soil health (Jodi DeJong-Hughes, UMN Extension), government assistance programs (Dave Rose, NRCS), and the challenges of growing late season cover crops (Dan Ley, dairy farmer). A wide range of cover crops will include purple top turnip, oilseed radish, forage peas, three types of vetch, red clover, buckwheat, lentils, millet, annual and cereal ryegrass, oats and flax.

    The field day is located 4 miles west of Richmond or 1 mile east of Roscoe on Highway 23. For more information call or email Brad Wenz at 320-251-7800 ext. 0 or Brad.Wenz@mn.nacdnet.net.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Sept 5 and 19

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties.
          This the first posting of my summaries of the Hay Auction at Sauk Centre for the 2013-2014 market year. I am posting the results of auctions held July 11, August 1 Sept 6 and 20, 2013.

         It's probably too early to draw firm conclusions about market trends. Drought was generally not as intense across the Midwest this year. Pastures and hay fields did dry up after mid-summer in some areas of Minnesota and other parts of the country. Alfalfa winter-kill was severe in southern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Many people I talk expect better quality alfalfa and grass hay at least to stay on the higher side of the market.

         See links below for these auction reports; followed by some suggestions about other sources of hay market information. Lots sold are grouped by bale type, kind of hay, alfalfa sorted in 25 RFV point groups, grass sorted based on protein. Straw and bedding materials are also listed.

         Averages are calculated where it seems appropriated. Look at averages carefully where there are a few loads in a group; and where there is a wide range of price. Wide price ranges usually mean some hay might have been in poor physical condition and did not sell well. Hay in better condition in the group brought a higher price. If you're looking for hay with better physical condition, you're probably going to pay a higher price.

    July 11 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf 

    Aug 1 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    Sept 5 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    Sept 19 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    History of Selected Lots 2013-2014.pdf  Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV. Includes averages through the last 4 sale seasons and for individual auctions held in July, August, and September 2013.

    Read further for more Hay Market Information

     

    Larry D. Jacobson, Extension Agricultural Engineer, U of M Extension

    With the harvest season fast approaching, the application of stored manure from animal facilities on the harvested fields will soon follow. This year, pork producers need to be aware of the risk of spreading Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) through equipment used to pump and land apply manure from all farms but especially those with pigs exhibiting clinical signs of the disease. PED can be spread through oral-fecal contact, manure contaminated boots, clothing, birds and wildlife, transport trailers and other equipment.

    PED is a viral enteric swine ONLY disease with clinical symptoms of diarrhea, fever, vomiting, and death (age dependent). PED was first detected in the United States this spring and as of the first of September the disease had been confirmed on more than 500 swine herds in the United States. Spread of the virus continues, and it is both a good animal husbandry practice and a good neighbor policy for all pork farmers with pigs exhibiting clinical signs of PED to obtain a confirmed diagnosis and immediately establish enhanced biosecurity practices to avoid spreading the virus within their own animals and (or) to neighboring swine herds.

    Because many pork producers hire commercial manure applicators to pump and land apply their manure from a farm's storage pits, tanks, and/or basins, their equipment can easily spread this virus from infected farms (barns) to uninfected farms (barns). In response to this urgent concern, the National Pork Board (NPB) along with several midwestern universities (Michigan State, Iowa State, and Minnesota) have just released a one page fact sheet listing the biosecurity recommendations that commercial manure haulers should follow to reduce the risk of spreading this virus.

    The fact sheet emphasizes the need for the manure applicator to communicate closely with the pork producers when pumping manure on a farm to reduce the risk of transferring this virus by manure handling equipment either from or to the farm.

    The fact sheet is available here: NPB's PED biosecurity recommendations for manure pumpers, 9-6-13.pdf

    By David Nicolai; Coordinator, University of Minnesota Institute for Ag Professionals

    Join us for a Corn Goss's Wilt and Rootworm Research Tour and Workshop Monday, August 26 at the University of Minnesota Rosemount Research and Outreach Center. Dr. Dean Malvick (Extension corn and soybean plant pathologist) and Dr. Ken Ostlie (Extension corn entomologist) will lead the research tours and workshop.

    Dean Malvick

    The unusual weather this season in Minnesota has created favorable conditions for various diseases in corn and soybean crops. Some diseases have been appearing since June due in part to delayed planting and crop growth and abundant rainfall in many areas. This article focuses on diseases that have been recently been confirmed and have raised concern. In corn fields, above average levels of common rust are being reported and Goss's wilt was confirmed in two fields. In soybean, Phytophthora root and stem rot and the less important but often noticed leaf diseases bacterial blight and Septoria brown spot are widespread. This is a good time of the year to scout fields for crop diseases.


    The Art of Swathing

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    Swathing or windrowing of wheat, barley and oats were, at one time, the default operations that signaled the beginning of harvest. The primary purpose of swathing is to speed up and even out the dry down of the crop. Swathing always posed a risk as grain in the swath is more prone to preharvest sprouting if threshing is delayed due to adverse weather

    Therefore, most wheat and barley is now straight cut in large part because modern varieties allow for it. Preharvest applications of glyphosate have further reduced need to swath wheat. In oats swathing remains more common place.

    Swathing is becoming, however, something of a lost art. First, you have to decide when the crop is ready to be swath. The optimum time to swath is when the crop has reached physiological maturity. This is the same time to consider the application glyphosate. This is the point in the development when the crop has reached its maximum dry weight and the grainfill period has come to an end. Moisture content of the grain will vary but the ranges from 30 to 40 percent. In the absence of a moisture meter, there are other cues that signal the crop has reached physiological maturity. One of the easiest is to look at the color of the uppermost internode, or peduncle. The upper most portion of the peduncle, just below the spike or panicle, will have turned very light green to yellow when the crop reaches physiological maturity. There still may be some green in the canopy below or in the glumes but the least mature kernels will no green left in them, when threshed out by hand, .

    Swathing before the crop reaches physiological maturity will result in yield and test weight losses and green kernels in the harvested grains. The losses get progressively worse the earlier you cut the crop. Research at NDSU in spring wheat and durum showed that swathing the grain at 45% moisture caused a 1 to 2 lb reduction in test weight and about a 10% reduction in grain yield. Swathing after physiological maturity increases the risk of shattering and will equally cause yield losses but no losses in grain quality. Shattering losses can be reduced by swathing in the early morning or late evening when some dew is present in the crop.

    The Art of Swathing

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    Swathing or windrowing of wheat, barley and oats were, at one time, the default operations that signaled the beginning of harvest. The primary purpose of swathing is to speed up and even out the dry down of the crop. Swathing always posed a risk as grain in the swath is more prone to preharvest sprouting if threshing is delayed due to adverse weather

    Therefore, most wheat and barley is now straight cut in large part because modern varieties allow for it. Preharvest applications of glyphosate have further reduced need to swath wheat. In oats swathing remains more common place.

    Swathing is becoming, however, something of a lost art. First, you have to decide when the crop is ready to be swath. The optimum time to swath is when the crop has reached physiological maturity. This is the same time to consider the application glyphosate. This is the point in the development when the crop has reached its maximum dry weight and the grainfill period has come to an end. Moisture content of the grain will vary but the ranges from 30 to 40 percent. In the absence of a moisture meter, there are other cues that signal the crop has reached physiological maturity. One of the easiest is to look at the color of the uppermost internode, or peduncle. The upper most portion of the peduncle, just below the spike or panicle, will have turned very light green to yellow when the crop reaches physiological maturity. There still may be some green in the canopy below or in the glumes but the least mature kernels will no green left in them, when threshed out by hand, .

    Swathing before the crop reaches physiological maturity will result in yield and test weight losses and green kernels in the harvested grains. The losses get progressively worse the earlier you cut the crop. Research at NDSU in spring wheat and durum showed that swathing the grain at 45% moisture caused a 1 to 2 lb reduction in test weight and about a 10% reduction in grain yield. Swathing after physiological maturity increases the risk of shattering and will equally cause yield losses but no losses in grain quality. Shattering losses can be reduced by swathing in the early morning or late evening when some dew is present in the crop.

    Protect pollinators while trying to protect your crops

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    By Robert Koch & Marla Spivak, Extension Entomologists

    Honey bees and native bees forage in and near soybean and cornfields, especially during dry weather. When treatment decisions are being made for pests of these crops, it is important to consider minimizing the risk to these pollinators. Bees are the most important pollinators of our fruits, vegetables and crops like alfalfa hay that feed our farm animals. Honey bees and the thousands of native bee species all rely on the flowers they pollinate for good nutrition and health. Bees are being pushed to the tipping point by various factors, such as disruption of natural habitats, diseases and parasites, and widespread overuse of pesticides.

    By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops


    The harvesting of ditch hay (grass and legumes growing along roadsides) has provided livestock owners with a source of forage for years.  Tight forage supplies, however, have led to a greater demand for ditch hay than usual this year.  If you feed or sell ditch hay, be sure you know what, if any, herbicides were applied to the ditch hay to avoid potential herbicide carryover issues in manure from animals fed the ditch hay. 

    Small Grains Disease Update 07-18-13

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    The grain fill is rapidly progressing towards physiological maturity in both spring and winter wheat across the State. Actually, the first winter wheat in West Central Minnesota was reportedly harvested today. The scouts continue to predominantly fin the tanspot/Septoria complex of leaf diseases and BYDV. Incidence of leaf rust remains low while no stem or stripe rust was found to date.

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of the great scab epidemic of 1993 and. Although we have made considerable progress towards controlling the disease, by now means have we eradicated or silenced the disease. Winter wheat trials in LeCenter and Crookston are showing a fair amount of FHB as do the some of the earliest spring wheat fields. It is too early to tell whether we have widespread problems this growing season but that the disease is here again this year is pretty clear.

    Therefore, assess the damage caused by FHB now and prepare for harvest accordingly. If you have little to no affected spikelets 10 to 14 days after anthesis you escaped the worst and can probably harvest the way you always do. If, however, you see 10% more of the spikelets affected, you need to make sure that you: 1) increase the fan speed to attempt to remove as much of the tombstone kernels as possible, 2) store the harvested grain separately as much as possible. The idea is to reduce the DON toxin levels as much as possible in the harvested grain and quarantine grain that may have elevated levels of DON as to not contaminate otherwise sound grain from other fields/varieties.

    Bruce Potter in Lamberton reported on flights of armyworm moths a few weeks back. Doug Holen confirmed armyworm damage in lodged grain earlier today in the Fergus Falls area that included leaf and head clipping. Armyworms are dark green to light brown worms that can get up to 1.5" inches in length. Scouting for armyworms requires some effort as they are largely inactive during the day. Look for the small fecal pellets on top of the soil and move debris and small clumps of soil around to find the larvae curled up underneath. A treatment to control armyworm is recommended if 4 to 5 larvae per square foot can be found across much of the field. Reduce this threshold if head clipping occurs.

    Small Grains Disease Update 07-18-13

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    The grain fill is rapidly progressing towards physiological maturity in both spring and winter wheat across the State. Actually, the first winter wheat in West Central Minnesota was reportedly harvested today. The scouts continue to predominantly fin the tanspot/Septoria complex of leaf diseases and BYDV. Incidence of leaf rust remains low while no stem or stripe rust was found to date.

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of the great scab epidemic of 1993 and. Although we have made considerable progress towards controlling the disease, by now means have we eradicated or silenced the disease. Winter wheat trials in LeCenter and Crookston are showing a fair amount of FHB as do the some of the earliest spring wheat fields. It is too early to tell whether we have widespread problems this growing season but that the disease is here again this year is pretty clear.

    Therefore, assess the damage caused by FHB now and prepare for harvest accordingly. If you have little to no affected spikelets 10 to 14 days after anthesis you escaped the worst and can probably harvest the way you always do. If, however, you see 10% more of the spikelets affected, you need to make sure that you: 1) increase the fan speed to attempt to remove as much of the tombstone kernels as possible, 2) store the harvested grain separately as much as possible. The idea is to reduce the DON toxin levels as much as possible in the harvested grain and quarantine grain that may have elevated levels of DON as to not contaminate otherwise sound grain from other fields/varieties.

    Bruce Potter in Lamberton reported on flights of armyworm moths a few weeks back. Doug Holen confirmed armyworm damage in lodged grain earlier today in the Fergus Falls area that included leaf and head clipping. Armyworms are dark green to light brown worms that can get up to 1.5" inches in length. Scouting for armyworms requires some effort as they are largely inactive during the day. Look for the small fecal pellets on top of the soil and move debris and small clumps of soil around to find the larvae curled up underneath. A treatment to control armyworm is recommended if 4 to 5 larvae per square foot can be found across much of the field. Reduce this threshold if head clipping occurs.

    By Dave Nicolai, Coordinator, Institute for Ag Professionals

    A reminder that the University of Minnesota Institute for Ag Professional's 2013 Field School for Ag Professionals will be held on July 30-31 which is a Tuesday and Wednesday at the University of Minnesota Agriculture Experiment Station, St. Paul Campus, University of Minnesota. The two-day program focuses on core principles in agronomy, entomology, plant pathology and weed science on the first day and builds on this foundation with timely, cutting-edge topics on the second day.

    This program is targeted towards agronomists, crop production retailers, seed sellers, consultants, Extension Educators, agriculture government agency personnel, farm managers and summer field scouts. Participants will have the opportunity to enhance their troubleshooting and crop management skills in specially designed plots that display actual cropping situations.

     A total of 12 Certified Crop Advisor Continuing Education Units will be offered for the two days of the Field School. Participants may choose to attend either day or both days of the field school. Advance registrations made before Thursday, July 25th are eligible for a discount; $150 per day or $270 for both days before July 25th, after July 25th the registration tuition will be $300 for both days. 

    Enrollment is limited to 120 participants, so please register early!





    Weed Management in Prevented Planting Acres

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    By Jeffrey L. Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist - Weed Science

    The wet weather pattern this spring and early summer has left a significant number of acres, especially in southeastern MN, unplanted.  Current estimates in southeastern MN project 30% of the tillable acres have not been planted and on many of these acres weeds such as giant ragweed, common lambsquarters and waterhemp are thriving. 

    Although weeds are beneficial from an erosion control perspective their rapid growth will make seedbed preparation for planting cover crops very difficult and weed seed production potential will challenge even the best weed management tactics available in 2014.

    Small Grains Disease Update 06/27/13

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    It may have taken some time to get in to the fields this year, but the small grains crops are now roaring away in the warmer weather. The earliest seeded fields are rapidly approaching heading and with that decisions about whether to use fungicide at anthesis are now front and center.

    Tan spot still appears to be the most prevalent disease with incidence up to 74% in scouted fields. If fields were sprayed earlier for this disease, new growth should be assessed to check that it remains free and clear of lesions. Research has shown that, if a fungicide was used at the time of weed control, a fungicide application to suppress Fusarium head blight or scab at anthesis (Feekes 10.51) will generally provide adequate control of tan spot for the remainder of the season. Nonetheless, scout the crop when the flag leaf is fully extended (Feekes 9) to see how aggressively tan spot has moved up through the canopy as about half the days these past two weeks have being favorable for tan spot infections. This is especially important for later seeded fields. If the disease progress is keeping pace with the crop development and lesions can be found on the penultimate leaf at Feekes 9, it is probably warranted to spray a fungicide at Feekes 9 and protect he flag leaf. Fungicide options for the Feekes 9 and Feekes 10.51 timing can be found here.

    Cereal aphids continue their march from the southern part of the state steadily northwards. There are now reports of Barley Yellow Dwarf virus (BYDV) in the southern part of the state and so it is very important to scout for these aphids. There is no control method for BYDV other than controlling aphid populations. For a discussion on how to scout for, and control these aphids, please refer this article put together by the State Extension Entomologists Ian MacRae (Uof M) and Janet Knodel (NDSU).

    The symptoms of BYDV can be variable depending on growth stage, crop, and variety. Look for stunting of plants (more common in early infections) and yellowing of leaves starting from the tip of the leaf and working down either edge. There may also be red to purple discolorations which are particularly common in oats. Because of our late planted crop, it is at more risk this year from early infection of BYDV which will have a greater impact on yield. Remember there will be about a 1 to 2 week delay before you are to see BYDV symptoms after infected aphids have fed on the plant.

    There have also been a few reports of leaf rust in the southern part of the state. At the moment these cases remain isolated but it is important to scout now for these rust diseases. Infection by leaf rust typically occurs at about 64°F with the best development occurring at 68-77°F. The risk models point to slightly less favorable conditions for leaf rust development compared to tan spot to date, but recent rains and next week's weather forecast point to more favorable conditions for leaf rust development.

    As we move towards anthesis we need to be thinking about control of FHB. For this, products such as Prosaro, generic Folicur and Caramba need to be applied at anthesis (Feekes 10.51). Unlike for the other fungal diseases, the decision to spray a fungicide at anthesis to suppress FHB is driven by weather-based risk assessment models. The scab diseases forecast tool can be found at http://mawg.cropdisease.com, http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/cropdisease/, and http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/. Currently the risk models have been trending at low risk for infection for all but the HRSW varieties that are rated very susceptible to FHB. The warm weather and high dew points increased the risk for these varieties to a moderate risk for infection these past few days.

    Madeleine Smith and Jochum Wiersma

    Small Grains Update 06/27/13

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    It may have taken some time to get in to the fields this year, but the small grains crops are now roaring away in the warmer weather. The earliest seeded fields are rapidly approaching heading and with that decisions about whether to use fungicide at anthesis are now front and center.

    Tan spot still appears to be the most prevalent disease with incidence up to 74% in scouted fields. If fields were sprayed earlier for this disease, new growth should be assessed to check that it remains free and clear of lesions. Research has shown that, if a fungicide was used at the time of weed control, a fungicide application to suppress Fusarium head blight or scab at anthesis (Feekes 10.51) will generally provide adequate control of tan spot for the remainder of the season. Nonetheless, scout the crop when the flag leaf is fully extended (Feekes 9) to see how aggressively tan spot has moved up through the canopy as about half the days these past two weeks have being favorable for tan spot infections. This is especially important for later seeded fields. If the disease progress is keeping pace with the crop development and lesions can be found on the penultimate leaf at Feekes 9, it is probably warranted to spray a fungicide at Feekes 9 and protect he flag leaf. Fungicide options for the Feekes 9 and Feekes 10.51 timing can be found here.

    Cereal aphids continue their march from the southern part of the state steadily northwards. There are now reports of Barley Yellow Dwarf virus (BYDV) in the southern part of the state and so it is very important to scout for these aphids. There is no control method for BYDV other than controlling aphid populations. For a discussion on how to scout for, and control these aphids, please refer this article put together by the State Extension Entomologists Ian MacRae (Uof M) and Janet Knodel (NDSU).

    The symptoms of BYDV can be variable depending on growth stage, crop, and variety. Look for stunting of plants (more common in early infections) and yellowing of leaves starting from the tip of the leaf and working down either edge. There may also be red to purple discolorations which are particularly common in oats. Because of our late planted crop, it is at more risk this year from early infection of BYDV which will have a greater impact on yield. Remember there will be about a 1 to 2 week delay before you are to see BYDV symptoms after infected aphids have fed on the plant.

    There have also been a few reports of leaf rust in the southern part of the state. At the moment these cases remain isolated but it is important to scout now for these rust diseases. Infection by leaf rust typically occurs at about 64°F with the best development occurring at 68-77°F. The risk models point to slightly less favorable conditions for leaf rust development compared to tan spot to date, but recent rains and next week's weather forecast point to more favorable conditions for leaf rust development.

    As we move towards anthesis we need to be thinking about control of FHB. For this, products such as Prosaro, generic Folicur and Caramba need to be applied at anthesis (Feekes 10.51). Unlike for the other fungal diseases, the decision to spray a fungicide at anthesis to suppress FHB is driven by weather-based risk assessment models. The scab diseases forecast tool can be found at http://mawg.cropdisease.com, http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/cropdisease/, and http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/. Currently the risk models have been trending at low risk for infection for all but the HRSW varieties that are rated very susceptible to FHB. The warm weather and high dew points increased the risk for these varieties to a moderate risk for infection these past few days.

    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    I am posting links here to May 16 and June 6 Hay Auction Summaries for the Mid American Quality Tested Hay Auction at Sauk Centre Minnesota. It shows lots sold, grouped by hay and bale type and quality, along with straw and corn stalks sold.

    May 16, 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    June 6 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf  Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV point groups from 101 to 200 RFV, Grass Hay 5-9% Protein and Medium Square Straw. A "season long average" has been calculated.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf  Averages of each auction through the season since 2001

    Mid-American Hay Auction will conduct an extra auction on July 11 and August 1.

    Read further for more information about Hay Markets, Late Planted Forage Options, Etc. Take a look on MN Crop News Articles on Cover Crops, Fallow Syndrome, other 2013 issues. 


     


    By Lizabeth Stahl and Jill Sackett, Extension Educators

     

    The challenging spring of 2013 resulted in wide-spread planting delays across the state and a significant amount of acres that remain unplanted at this time.  If the decision has been made to take the "prevented planting" option for insurance purposes, the question remains about what to do with these acres.  Leaving the ground bare greatly increases the risk of not only soil erosion, but also the risk of "Fallow Syndrome" the following year. 

    Late Planted Forage Crop Options

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    by Dan Martens, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Some farmers have been still trying to plant corn for silage or other forage crops to meet feed needs for dairy and beef cattle. Recent rain has made a mess of these efforts again recently.
    One of the more recent field trials done to look at Late planted forage crop options was done in Pelican Rapids and Rosemount in 2002 and 2003. I am posting a report of that study here.

    Late planted forage trial 02 03.pdf

    University of Wisconsin Extension has also dealt with this issue over the years. You might find some additional useful information at

    http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/articles.htm





    By Daniel Kaiser and John Lamb
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialists

    Many of our earlier planted fields in Minnesota have been exhibiting some significant variation in plant growth and yellowing this spring.  Our conditions in May and early June have been less than favorable for corn growth and for the release of nutrients from organic matter.  Due to the heavy rains nitrogen loss is being increasingly questioned and the decision of whether to side-dress or not will need to be made sooner or later.  There are a few considerations to make when deciding if more nitrogen should be applied.

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally June 13 Evening
    ; UPDATE June 14 about 9:45 a.m. Note to watch potential insect issues.

    The "PDF" document listed here is information from field observations and lab tests we have so far from June 13. We may get a couple more reports on Friday and then I will aim to update the PDF posted here later in the day on Friday. I will note the UPDATE time.  

    Alfalfa Field Data June 13 2013.pdf

    The weather clearly drives decisions now. Making the best of it still counts. Weather looks a LITTLE more hopeful.

    Wide Swath? Maybe not THAT wide. Regional Extension Educator Doug Holen offered today that farmers have told him that with wet soil conditions, they lay the swath as wide as they can without driving on it. Pressing hay into soft ground is not a good deal, nor is tracking mud up on the swath. Thanks, Doug... and farmers who shared this.

    Alfalfa Weevil? Could be. There are a couple of notes at the end of the June 13 Field Data pdf related to alfalfa weevil larva (AWL) and potato leafhoppers. We should be on the watch for both through second crop harvest. AWL could be an issue with second crop regrowth.  There is a growing degree day monitoring map for AWL. Local conditions could vary. Take a look at:

    Thermal Models for insect pests. The full URL is http://www.soils.wisc.edu/uwex_agwx

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to:

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting.html

    LATE AND PREVENTED PLANTING: Check other news items posted here for links to a wider variety of information about late and prevented planting issues. Corn silage is still the best forage option for any of the corn silage that people still need to plant for the coming year.


    By Robert Koch, Extension Entomologist

    On June 11, 2013, we found soybean aphids on soybean at the Rosemount Research and Outreach Center near Rosemount, MN. Not many beans were out of the ground there, but in the two fields we sampled, we found aphids. We sampled one commercial soybean field at the VC growth stage (unifoliate leaves unfolded) and found 7.5% of plants infested with 1 to 9 aphids on each infested plant. The other field we sampled was a small plot trial, also at the VC growth stage, and had 10% of plants infested with 2 to 3 aphids on each plant.

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally June 10 Evening

    UPDATED JUNE 11 8pm... NO UPDATES June 12

    The "PDF" document listed here is information from field observations and lab tests we have so far from June 10. We may get a couple more reports on Wednesday and I will aim to update the PDF posted here later in the day on Wednesday. I will note the UPDATE time.  

    Alfalfa Field Data June 10 2013.pdf

    The weather clearly drives decisions now. Even where we are beyond some of the quality goals on some farms, It still all counts in a market or feedbunk. There are a couple of notes related to that at the end of the report.

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to:

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting.html

    LATE AND PREVENTED PLANTING: Check other news items posted here for links to a wider variety of information about late and prevented planting issues. Corn silage is still the best forage option for any of the corn silage that people still need to plant for the coming year.

    By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops

    Volunteer corn has become one of the more prevalent weeds in fields across the Midwest. Conditions experienced in 2012, however, have combined to create almost a perfect storm in some fields for potentially high volunteer corn populations in 2013.

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally June 6 about 10 p.m.
    UPDATED JUNE 7 about 4:30 p.m. Added Wanderee info.
    UPDATED JUNE 10 Evening. Added Dreier and Hoen

    The "PDF" document listed here is information from field observations and lab tests we have so far from June 6. We will likely get a couple more reports on Friday and I will aim to update the PDF posted here later in the day on Friday. I will not the update time.  

    Alfalfa Field Data June 6 2013.pdf

    It's seems to be pretty much a weather game now. There might be a site here and there that has some room to grow and mature on the RFV scale for milk cow hay, more so to the north. I'd guess a lot of it across the Stearns-Benton latitude and south is ready. Beef and heifer hay raisers have some time. Some of our grass hay will be ready to go for better quality too when the sun comes out long enough to get at it. Some people might be calling around to see if there's someone in the neighborhood who can bale and wrap hay or make use of other options on some farms. The rainy weather pattern makes this difficult. When the weather allows harvest, it will be important to follow harvest and storage practices to make the best of the crop.

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to:

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting.html

    LATE AND PREVENTED PLANTING: Check other news items posted here for links to a wider variety of information about late and prevented planting issues. Corn silage is still the best forage option for any of the corn silage that people still need to plant for the coming year.





    By Dave Nicolai, IAP Program Coordinator

    The 2013 Field School for Ag Professionals will be held on July 30 - 31 at the University of Minnesota Agriculture Experiment Station, St. Paul Campus, University of Minnesota. The St. Paul Campus (located in Falcon Heights, MN next to the Minnesota State Fairgrounds at Larpenteur and Gortner Ave) is this year's site for the Field School for Ag Professional which is the summer training opportunity that combines hand-on training and real-world field scenarios that no winter program can offer.  The two-day program focuses on core principles in agronomy, entomology, weed and soil sciences on the first day to build a foundation for participants and builds on this foundation with timely, cutting-edge topics on the second day.

    Snow, rain, mud, now what?

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    crop news late plant  pic 4.jpg

    The weather has put us in a bind. Significant amounts of planting have yet to be completed, which has led to questions on the "correct" course of action. There will be no one "correct" course of action and with fields unsuitable for planting and more rain in the forecast there will be no easy decisions. One choice could be to utilize prevented planting, a choice that is appropriate for some and will lead to many other decisions to be made. A second option is to switch corn acres to soybeans; this may also be a wise and appropriate decision for some acres. Remember when planting soybeans after June 10th it is generally recommended to drop 0.5 RM from your typical full season varieties. The final choice is to stay the course and plant corn, a perfectly viable option for some acres.
    A full set of delayed planting resources can be found at: http://z.umn.edu/lateplanting

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally June 4 about 11 a.m.
    UPDATED 5 PM JUNE 4
    UPDATED 4:15 JUNE 5

    The "PDF" document listed here is information from field observations and lab tests we have so far from June 3. We will likely get a couple more reports on Wednesday and will update again Wednesday afternoon as needed.l will note accordingly. 

    Alfalfa Field Data June 3 2013.pdf

    We're in the ballpark with some fields where people could look for a weather opportunity to harvest milk cow quality hay, depending on feed needs and ration strategies. Hay growers will consider past experience with fields, livestock, and the weather in checking field and making harvest decisions. The rainy weather pattern makes this difficult. When the weather allows harvest, it will be important to follow harvest and storage practices to make the best of the crop.

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to:

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting.html


    Small Grains Disease Update

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    Early Season Scouting in Small Grains: Tan Spot

    With the overcast and humid days which many parts of the state have been experiencing in the last week, be sure to scout smalls grains for signs of early tan spot infection. Tan spot will be particularly prevalent on previous wheat ground. Spring wheat in trials on the Northwest Research and Outreach Center at Crookston has 100% incidence with tan spot. There is some tan spot in the winter wheat. Early signs of tan spot in fields south of Moorhead, Minnesota, have also been identified.


    Tan spot is identifiable by the brown spots often surrounded by a yellow halo that appear on leaves. These may run together to form patches or larger areas of yellowing and browning.

    View image

    Be careful not to mistake nitrogen deficiency or symptoms of BYDV for tan spot.

    If you do see tan spot, you can use a tank mix with herbicide and fungicide for control of this disease. If left unchecked, this disease will continue to progress and will impact yield. A number of different fungicides can be used for control of this disease ( see table) This year, we are interested in collecting isolates of tan spot. So if found, please can you contact me via e-mail smit7273@umn.edu BEFORE you spray and we will try to collect a sample.

    10 Fungicide Table Early Season Wheat.jpg

    BYDV could be another disease that we see this year if aphids become prevalent (particularly bird cherry oat and English grain aphids). Symptoms of BYDV will vary depending on the crop, variety and the growth stage at which the plants become infected. General yellowing of the leaves are common. Reddening also occurs, especially in oats, but is dependent upon variety and crop. These symptoms will usually start from the tip of the leaf and work their way down either edge of the leaf. Eventually the whole leaf may become yellow. If plants are infected with the virus early, they will often become extremely dwarfed, may produce excess tillers, and the leaves will have a more erect habit. If infection is severe, it may result in yield losses.

    So whilst out looking for tan spot, it's a good idea to check for those aphids too!

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally in the evening on May 30
    UPDATE LATE MONDAY JUNE 3 - MORE DATA, A COUPLE OF NOTES

    The "PDF" document listed provides data from fields we have information from so far for May 30 sampling and previous sample day information. We might get a couple more lab reports on Monday. We aim to sample fields again on Monday June 3 and will make a June 3 posting later in the day. 

    Alfalfa Field Data May 30 2013.xls

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or using PEAQ sticks to estimate feed quality go to

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting.html

    Where stands are getting to 24 to 26 inches with buds showing, some farmers could be watching for suitable weather and field conditions to make better quality dairy hay. Some people might let some winter stressed fields go longer with the hope of better root health. We have shared some information about that in the May 23 and 28 postings.








    By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops, and Jeff Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist - Weed Science

    With very tight windows of opportunity to plant this year, preemergence herbicides may not have been applied as planned.  Application of a residual herbicide prior to planting or emergence of the crop, in both corn and soybean, is a great weed management strategy overall and also a key tool in managing against herbicide resistance.  What are some of our options if soybeans emerged before a preemergence herbicide application was made?   

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted Originally May 28 10 p.m.
    UPDATED May 29 about 5:30 p.m. with more data and a couple of notes about situations where PEAQ data is greatly different from lab test results.

    The "PDF" document listed here is Central MN Alfalfa Harvest Alert Scissors-Cut Data and PEAQ readings received so far for May 28. We aim to sample again on Thursday May 30 and will post some of that information on Thursday and Friday afternoon.  

    Alfalfa Field Data May 28 2013.pdf

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting,html

    SHOULD I WAIT LONGER TO HARVEST WINTER STRESSED FIELDS? (a couple of update notes....Follow "Continue Reading"



    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    Posted originally May 23 10 p.m. UPDATED May 24 5 p.m.

    The "PDF" document listed here is Central MN Alfalfa Harvest Alert scissors-cut data and PEAQ readings received so far for May 23. We will be getting more information from May 23 and I will update the "PDF" document listed here and note when it was updated. We will take samples again on Tuesday May 28.

    Alfalfa Field Data May 23 2013.pdf

    If we get warmer weather with some sunshine, we could expect significant growth and maturing by Tuesday May 28. Some showers are in the forecast. Earlier fields could be ready for harvest by June 1. More people might be taking a closer look at the fields and the weather during the first week in June. It might be by the time the weather gives us a chance to harvest hay, the crop will be plenty ready.

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting,html

    SHOULD I WAIT LONGER TO HARVEST WINTER STRESSED FIELDS? Follow "Continue Reading"

    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    May 20 about 5:45 PM

    The link listed here provides Central "MN Alfalfa Harvest Alert" scissors-cut data and PEAQ readings received so far for May 20. If we get more information from May 20 I will update the information in the link posted here. So far we have information from farms in McLeod, Wright and Benton Counties. Samples will be taken again on Thursday May 23.

    Alfalfa Field Data May 20 2013.pdf

    In taking samples in Benton County, I got back the office thinking: "The crop might not be as late getting ready for harvest...as it seems like spring was in getting here. Keep an eye on fields."

    For more information about using and interpreting information from alfalfa scissors-cut sampling or in using PEAQ sticks, go to

    www.extension.umn.edu/forages/harvesting,html



    Hybrid Maturity Considerations for Delayed Corn Planting

    By David Nicolai and Doug Holen, Extension Educators - Crops


    The University of Minnesota Extension Forage Team has developed a list of resources available to livestock and alfalfa producers affected by the recent alfalfa winter injury and winterkill in 2013. These resources are available at the U of MN Extension crops website http://www1.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/crops/spring-issues/

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report May 2, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, U of M Extension Educator in Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    Three Items:

    1. Reports from May 2, 2013 Sauk Centre Hay Auction (here)

    2. Winter Alfalfa Injury Resources (read more)

    3. Alfalfa Harvest Alert Scissors Cut Project in Central MN (read more)

    MAY 2 HAY AUCTION REPORTS


    May 2 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A summary of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold... grouped by kind of hay, type of bale and 25 RFV points... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV point are calculated.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf ... A summary of hay auctions held this year showing Medium Square Alfalfa 101-200 RFV divided in 25 RFV groups, and medium sq. straw.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A line graph of these auctions from 2001 to 2013. For the Feb 16 auction, the 176-200 RFV group is just one load - so not really an average.

    The next auction at Sauk Centre will be held on Thursday May 16.

    By Daniel Kaiser

    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

    With the variation in conditions we have seen this spring there are a few issues that may show up in fields related to cool and wet soils. Purpling of corn leaves due to phosphorus (P) deficiency and early season interveinal striping due to sulfur (S) may occur if temperatures remain cool and we continue to have frequent rains. I want to take some time and outline these issues and some of the related research that has been conducted in the past five years.

    By John Wiersma
    Agronomist
    Northwest Research and Outreach Center

    High pH, highly calcareous soils, common in western Minnesota, restrict the availability of soil Fe needed for optimum soybean growth and yield. On such soils, the amount of Fe fertilizer applied must surpass a threshold before there is sufficient available Fe in the soil solution to induce a positive growth response. Only a limited number of management tactics designed to improve the availability of Fe have been studied with soybean. These include variety selection, seeding density, seed-applied or in-furrow materials, and foliar treatments.

    By Dr. Craig Sheaffer, David Nicolai and Doug Holen

    An unusual amount of winter injury and winterkill of alfalfa stands occurred in south central and southern Minnesota. While reports do not represent a detailed analysis of where injury to alfalfa has occurred across Minnesota, they do suggest a need for producers to check on stands and evaluate them for potential winter injury.


    Les Everett - Water Resources Center Education Coordinator, U of M. Randy Pepin and Jose A. Hernandez - Extension Educators, University of Minnesota - Extension

    Using grid soil sampling to guide manure application can be a profitable investment, is the conclusion from case studies based on eight Minnesota farms. In fields where there is a history of non-uniform manure application, targeting new manure applications to areas with lower phosphorus and potassium soil test values can result in considerable economic returns above the cost of grid soil sampling. Variable rate manure applicators are not required when fields can be divided into application and no-application zones, with supplemental nitrogen fertilizer in the no-manure zones. The brief case studies are available on the University of Minnesota Extension web page for Manure Management and Air Quality http://www.manure.umn.edu, under Grid Soil Sampling for Manure Application. An introduction, the eight case studies, and a set of short video presentations based on the case studies are available at http://z.umn.edu/gridsoilsampling.

    Funding for the development of these case studies was provided by the McKnight Foundation.

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting 3 items based on information from the April 18, 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre Minnesota. The next auction is scheduled for May 2, starting at 12:30.

    April 18 SC Hay Auction.pdf.. A list of tested lots sold an bedding materials, grouped by bale type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf... Average and range of values for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV, listed for each sale this year.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... Line graph for market years since 2001 for Medium Square Alfalfa in groups by 25 RFV points from 101-200 RFV.


    By Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

    Management of Iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis (IDC) in soybean is seemingly and endless topic of research in soybean growing areas with high pH, calcareous, parent materials. We are just finishing a three-year summary of a series of IDC management strip trials that began in 2010. Our main focus for this work was to study the variability in response for a tolerant and susceptible variety to an oat companion crop and a 6% EDDHA-Fe treatment applied in-furrow (we used Soygreen at a rate of 3 lbs of product per acre). The field areas were selected to have some variation in the severity of IDC.

    By Daniel Kaiser

    University Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

    With the extreme variability in growing conditions there have been some questions regarding the variability in soil test. A project is being launched to establish a series of sentinel plots to study the monthly variation in soil test values over the next two growing season. We are looking for participants that are willing to take samples from a single point within a field and mail them off to us at Saint Paul. The goal of this study is to gain a better understanding of what is happening over the growing season for a number of different nutrients commonly measured.

    Black cutworm pheromone trapping network

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    By Bruce Potter

    IPM Specialist SW MN

    The late spring has had one advantage.   Migration of insect pests from the south into Minnesota has been delayed.

    The black cutworm, one of the migrant pest species that sporadically causes problems in Minnesota crops, reduced stands in some 2011 and 2012 corn fields.  The females prefer to lay eggs in un-worked fields where areas of winter annual or early spring germinating weeds, common lambsquarters for example, occur.

    Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

    I know there are still questions on the application of sulfur for soybean.  Between me and a number of other researchers in Minnesota, we have been working on a number of projects focusing on sulfur management on corn, soybean, and spring wheat.  Recently the soybean research has been fully summarized so I want to take a minute or two to highlight some of the findings to outline where we are at with the current guidelines for fertilizer management on soybean.

    Safely Handling Treated Seed

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    By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops

    Much of the seed planted this year will have been treated with a fungicide, insecticide and/or nematicide. As when working with any pesticide, care should be taken when handling treated seed so that exposure to the handler, non-target organisms, and the environment is reduced or prevented as much as possible.

    Planting Window for Small Grains Already Closing

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    While nearly all the small grains were seeded in Minnesota by this date in 2012, this spring is a different story. The unseasonably cold temperatures and relentless snow fall is setting us up for a (very) late spring. This will mean that, already, the planting window for small grains is closing for parts of the state. Understand that you can still plant spring wheat, barley, and oats after the last recommended date but that the chances to have good, competitive grain yields and quality are greatly reduced.

    Check out this post from 2008 to understand how and why the planting window for wheat, barley and oats is what it.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report April 4, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting 3 items based on information from the April 4, 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre Minnesota. The next auction is scheduled for April 18, starting at 12:30.

    Apr 4 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf.. A list of tested lots sold an bedding materials, grouped by bale type and quality.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf .... Average and range of values for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101 to 200 RFV, listed for each sale this year. 

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf.... Line graph for market years since 2001 for Medium Square Alfalfa in groups by 25 RFV points from 101-200 RFV.


    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report March 21, 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    I am posting three items based on the March 21 Sauk Centre Hay Auction:

    Mar 21 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf... a list of loads sold, divided by kind and type of bale of hay or bedding, RFV in 25 point groups for alfalfa, grass based on protein... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV are calculated.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf... Average and range for Medium Square alfalfa RFV 101-200 in 25 point groups, medium square straw and round bales grass hay 5-9% protein

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf.. Line graph for Medium Square Alfalfa groups 101-200 RFV.

    Read further for discussion about evaluating alfalfa stands this spring
    Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist
    University of Minnesota


    Seemingly unpredictable weather conditions each spring inevitably bring up questions on placement of fertilizer with the seed.  Starter fertilizer has played an important role in nutrient management in corn in Minnesota.  However, tools for deciding on how much that can safely be applied have not been widely available.  While these tools can be used common sense is still needed in making a decision on what should be done.

    Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

    A few questions arose over the winter as to options for spring applied nitrogen for small grains in areas where fall application was not possible.  One option that was questioned was increasing application rates with the air seeder.  While this does present increased risk, with spring approaching I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight some resources available for helping make decisions on what to apply.  Application with the air seeder allows for more options due to a wide range of seedbed utilized with the various seed spread patters available. 

    Soil Testing For K

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    By Daniel Kaiser
    Extension Soil Fertility Specialist


    With spring finally approaching it is a good time to address some questions on soil testing that came up of the winter concerning testing soils in a field moist state versus the standard dried samples that are run through soil testing labs.  First I would like to make it clear that the issue of drying of a soil sample mainly pertains to potassium.  Most other tests routinely run through the lab are not affected by drying of the sample.  The reason why potassium is different is due to its chemistry in the soil.  We currently have finished the second year of potassium studies looking at both testing methods but will be continuing this work for the foreseeable future to gain a better understanding of what is going on within the soil.

    By Doug Holen, Dr. Phil Glogoza and Dr. Craig Sheaffer on March 28, 2013

    The increasing cost of forages, fearing continued 2012 droughty conditions, and extending the winter season has many producers wondering about the productivity of their hay fields in 2013. While temperatures have been respectively cold this winter, the good news is that an insulating layer of snow has persisted across most of the state for an extended period of time.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report March 7, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties

    41 LOADS - That's just the Loads of Large Round Bales-Grass Hay in the 5-9% protein range...41. What a pile of hay!

    Prices continue to run strong.

    I am posting links to the my summary reports following the March 7, 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre ... should try to get this posted at least one day ahead of the next auction on March 21 - don't ya' think...

    Mar 7 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf .... A list of all tested hay lots and bedding material sold... grouped by kind of hay, RFV, and type of bale ... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV point calculated

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf... A summary of auctions held since September; Medium Square Alfalfa 101 to 200 in 25 RFV point groups, bedding material, round grass bales protein 5-9

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A line grahp of Auction seasons since 2001

    The next auction at Sauk Centre is on March 21.

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report Feb. 21, 2013

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting links to the following reports following the Feb. 21, 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre.

    Feb 21 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf .... A list of all tested hay lots and bedding material sold... grouped by kind of hay, RFV, and type of bale ... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV point calculated

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf ... A summary of auctions held since September; Medium Square Alfalfa 101 to 200 in 25 RFV point groups, bedding material, round grass bales protein 5-9

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A line grahp of Auction seasons since 2001

    The next auction at Sauk Centre is on March 7

    Read further about Workshops coming up:
    1. Capturing $Value of Manure Nutrients and Alfalfa N Credits
        Little Falls March 8, Foley March 19, Melrose March 20

    2. Forage for U - featuring Dan Undersander, Wisconsin Extension Forage Specialist
        Fergus Falls March 19, Hutchinson March 20, Rushford March 21

    Source: Doug Holen, Extension Educators in Crops, U of M Extension

    To address key forage production and management issues in Minnesota, a series of Forage Workshops will be held the week of March 18th. Individual sites include Fergus Falls on March 19th in the AgCountry Farm Credit Service Building, Hutchinson on March 20th at the McLeod County Fairgrounds, and Rushford on March 21st at the Lynndyn Bridge Restaurant.

    University of Minnesota Extension is presenting workshops for livestock producers and ag professionals on the use of grid soil sampling to guide manure application. Grid soil phosphorus and potassium maps from Minnesota livestock farms are used to create manure application zones and manure exclusion zones within fields in order to maximize the economic value of the manure as a fertilizer replacement and minimize phosphorus in runoff. Determination of manure application rates and supplemental fertilizer where necessary are part of the demonstration and discussion. Eight case studies are posted on the UM Extension manure website, http://z.umn.edu/manure .

    Since the number of workshops funded by the McKnight Foundation project grant is limited, we invite county feedlot officerss and NRCS/SWCD staff to attend one of the following workshops. The workshop presentation Powerpoint is available for those wishing to conduct their own workshops, and a few more workshops could be presented by Randy Pepin, UM Extension (pepin019@umn.edu).

    Workshops have been held Feb. 12, 26, and 27. Remaining workshops and hosts are:.

    March 5: 11 a.m., Lake Crystal American Legion, Diane DeWitt, UM Extension.
    March 6: 1 p.m., Murray County Courthouse, Slayton, Mike Boersma, UM Extension.

    Capturing $-Value from Manure & Alfalfa Nutrients

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator in Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    WORKSHOPS in Little Falls March 8, Foley March 19, Melrose March 20
         At each site the workshop will start with registration at 9:30 a.m.; program starts at 10 a.m.; lunch at noon; and adjourn at 2:00 p.m.
         MORNING MANURE NUTRIENT TOPIC AT ALL SITES
         Randy Pepin, Extension Educator with Nutrient Management Projects, will lead a discussion built around on-farm case studies looking at soil grid sampling information as a clue for manure application decisions. Whether you've used grid sampling, you're just thinking about it, or just want to consider strategies for making good use of manure nutrients - you will likely gain something useful from this discussion.
         AFTERNOON ALFALFA NITROGEN CREDIT TOPIC AT LITTLE FALLS AND MELROSE
         Extension Corn Agronomist Jeff Coulter and research assistant Matt Yost will share information about on-farm field trials looking at nitrogen available to a corn crop following alfalfa. Many farmers and crop advisors have valid questions about whether you can bank on 150 pounds of nitrogen available to a corn crop following alfalfa. The field trials are providing some valid information to look at these questions.
         AFTERNOON AT FOLEY:
         Alfalfa N Credits - Extension Educator Dan Martens
         Benton SWCD / NRCS Field Trials and Resources
         MPCA Feedlot and Manure Application Discussion

    Check the attached flyer for times locations and registration information. Lunch will be free for the first 30 registrations.  Manure Alfalfa Nutrients Workshop.pdf



    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Report Feb. 7, 2013

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    By Dan Martens

    This information is from the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on February 7, 2013. I am posting three reports:

    Feb 7 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf...  A list of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold ... grouped by kind of hay, RFV and type of bale ... cost per pound of dry matter and cost per RFV point are calculated.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf ... A summary of auctions held this year: Medium Square Alfalfa 101 to 200 RFV divided in 25 point groups, and bedding material.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A line graph of auction seasons from 2001 to 2010

    You can look at USDA Hay Market Reports at http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs. Click on "Livestock, Poultry and Grain News" in the middle of the page... and then Click on "Hay" in the middle of the next page. and a "hay wanted" and "hay  for sale" Minnesota Hay List at www.haylist.umn.edu 

    Ken Barnett, U Wisconsin Extension posts a useful Upper Midwest Hay prices summary at Weekly Hay Prices

    Read more for information about three Workshops on Manure Nutrient Management and Alfalfa nitrogen credits for corn following alfalfa in the crop rotation.


    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Jan. 17, 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting three items based on information from the Jan. 17 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre MN.

    Jan 17 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A list of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold... grouped by kind of hay, bale type, RFV in 25 point groups for alfalfa and by protein for grass.. cost per pound of dry matter and cost per RFV point are calculated.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf ... Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101-200 RFV. This include average for each of the last 4 years and for each auction so far this year. Medium Square Straw is also listed.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... Line graph for average price of Medium Square Alfalfa by 25 RFV groups. Dotted lines indicate where sales did not have hay in that group.

    Hay Stocks Dec 1 2012.pdf... USDA Hay Inventory Dec 1, 2012 USDA report by states for hay on inventory December 1, 2011 and 2012.

    Read more... for information about:
    Winter Forage Workshops: Feb 5 at Floodwood in NE MN; Feb 6 at Richmond in Central MN; and Feb 7 at Rochester in SE MN
    Private Pesticide Applicator Workshops
    Minnesota Milk Producers Dairy Management Workshops Feb 5 at St. Joseph; Feb 6 at Rochester.
    District DHIA Meetings, NE at Foley Feb 7 features Brant Groen's "Udder Dissection Clinic"
    Farm Estate and Farm Transfer workshop February 13 at St. Augusta

    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Jan. 3 2013

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    By Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting three items based on information from the January 3 2013 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre.

    Jan 3 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A list of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold... grouped by kind of hay, bale type, RFV in 25 point groups for alfalfa and by protein for grass.. cost per pound of dry matter and cost per RFV point are calculated.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf ... Average and range of RFV values and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa in 25 RFV groups from 101-200 RFV. This include average for each of the last 4 years and for each auction so far this year. Medium Square Straw is also listed.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... Line graph for average price of Medium Square Alfalfa by 25 RFV groups. Dotted lines indicate where sales did not have hay in that group.

    Read more... for information about:
    Winter Forage Workshops: Feb 5 at Floodwood in NE MN;  Feb 6 at Richmond in Central MN; and Feb 7 at Rochester in SE MN
    MFA Wisconsin Forage Symposium Jan 21-13 at Wisconsin Dells
    Private Pesticide Applicator Workshops
    Minnesota Milk Producers Dairy Management Workshops Feb 5 at St. Joseph; Feb 6 at Rochester.




    Sauk Centre Hay Auction Dec 20 2012

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    by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
    I am posting three items based on information from the December 20 Hay Auction at Sauk Centre:

    Dec 20 2012 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... Lots sold are grouped by bale type, kind of hay and 25 RFV points for alfalfa, and based on protein for grass. Straw and corn stalks are included. Averages are calculated where it seem appropriate.

    History of Selected Lots 2012 2013.pdf  ... Average and Range of RFV and prices for Medium Square Alfalfa by 25 RFV points from 101 to 200 RFV for sales so far this year. Grass Hay 5-9% Protein is listed for this year. Medium Square straw is also listed. This also lists season-long average and range values for each of the last 5 years.

    Graph 2001 to 2013 SC Hay Auction.pdf... Line graph of markets for Medium Square Alfalfa groups from 2001 to present time. This year's line is Maroon. Dotted lines indicate where there were not any loads in the group at a sale.

    We are working with the Midwest Forage Association to have a Central MN Winter Forage Meeting on Wednesday February 6 at River Station at Richmond. There will be a similar meeting Feb 5 in NE MN at Floodwood and Feb 7 in SE MN Rochester  at Rochester.

    Read more for information about some other things coming in January

    U of MN Field Crop Trials Bulletin Available

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    By Lizabeth Stahl

    The University of MN Field Crop Trials Bulletin is now available in print and electronic forms. The new publication, dated January 2013, provides results from U of MN trials conducted in 2012 across the state. The varieties tested are from both public and private breeding programs and include U of MN developed forage, grain, and oilseed crop varieties.

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