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February 2012 Archives

Sauk Centre Hay Auction Feb 16, 2012

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by Dan Martens, U of M Extension Educator in Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
This information is from the Sauk Centre Hay Auction held on Feb. 16, 2012. It is based on information provided by Stearns DHIA Lab and the Mid-American Auction Company.

Feb 16 2012 SC Hay Auction.pdf ... A summary of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold... grouped by kind of hay, type of bale and 25 RFV points... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV point are calculated.

History of Selected Lots 2011 2012.pdf... A summary of hay auctions held this year showing Medium Square Alfalfa 101-200 RFV divided in 25 RFV groups, and medium sq. straw.

Graph SC Hay Auction 2001-2012.pdf ... A line graph of these auctions from 2001 to 2012. For the Feb 16 auction, the 176-200 RFV group is just one load - so not really an average.

The next auction at Sauk Centre will be held on Thursday March 1.

You can look at the USDA Hay Market Report at http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LSMNpubs Select "Hay" in the middle of the page.


Sauk Centre Hay Auction Feb 2 2012

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by Dan Martens , U of M Extension Educator in Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties
This information is from the Sauk Centre MN hay auction held on Feb. 2, 2012. It is based on information provided by Stearns DHIA lab and the Mid-American Auction Company.

Feb 2 2012 SC Hay Auction.pdf .... A summer of all tested hay lots and bedding materials sold ... grouped by kind of hay, type of bale and 25 RFV points... cost per pound of dry matter and per RFV point are calculated.

History of Selected Lots 2011 2012.pdf ... A summary of auctions held this year: Medium Square Alfalfa 101-200 RFV divided in 25 RFV point groups, and medium square straw.

Graph SC Hay Auction 2001-2012.pdf ... A line graph of auctions from 2001 to 2012. Dotted lines indicate where hay was not sold in a group at a particular sale. Averages might not mean so much when 1 a few loads were sold.

Read more for a little discussion about alfalfa winter survival and other sources of market information.

What's Manure Worth?

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UMN Extension has developed a new web-based calculator to determine the value of manure

William F. Lazarus - Extension Economist, Jose A. Hernandez - Extension Educator, and Les Everett - Water Resources Center Education Coordinator. University of Minnesota - Extension

A new web-based tool developed by Dr. William F. Lazarus, Extension Economist and Professor in the Department of Applied Economics, is now available. The web-based calculator may be used to compare the economic value of manure from alternative manure application rates and methods. The value is based on crop nutrient needs for a specific field and crop rotation, fertilizer prices, manure hauling costs, manure type, and application method. In addition to assisting with management of current livestock and crop operations, the calculator can be useful in budgeting new facilities or evaluation of contract production through estimating the effect of manure and manure management on cash flow. The calculations can also assist crop and livestock producer estimate the value of manure that may be transferred or sold from one entity to another.

Livestock producers face uncertain markets and narrow margins. This situation motivates growers to optimize production methods, utilizing all resources including manure. In addition, an increase in the price of commercial fertilizer experienced since 2009, has heightened interest in the use of livestock manure for supplying crop nutrients and has significantly increased the value of manure as a nutrient source.

In recent years more producers have been considering the contribution of manure value to cash flow in livestock operation budgets, and seeking an appropriate market value in exchange situations between livestock producers and crop producers. More crop producers also appear to be seeking manure as a major nutrient source, either by purchasing from a livestock producer or by adding livestock to their operations, particularly swine finishing.

Determining the economic value of the nutrients in livestock manure can be tricky. Nutrients in commercial fertilizer are acquired by paying for the nutrients and a small application charge. With manure you, in effect, "acquire" nutrients by paying for the cost of application, even if you already have ownership of the manure in a storage structure.

Additionally, commercial fertilizer supplies the amount and ratio of nutrients you need or ordered. With manure, you get the amount and ratio of nutrients that it contains, which complicates the determination of a value. Even when a rate that supplies the correct amount of nitrogen is applied, the amount of phosphorous and potash applied may not match what you would have purchased commercially, and amounts applied above crop need probably have no value. In the past, manure application costs often exceeded the value of the nutrients applied. Now, in many situations, the nutrient value in the manure exceeds the cost of application.

The web-based calculator is available at http://z.umn.edu/manurevalue. For more information about manure economics please visit: http://z.umn.edu/manureworth.

Funding for the development of this tool was provided by Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Section 319 Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program from the Environmental Protection Agency.

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