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Extension > Minnesota Crop News > 2012 University of Minnesota Field School for Ag Professionals set for July 25 & 26: Reminder to Register Soon

2012 University of Minnesota Field School for Ag Professionals set for July 25 & 26: Reminder to Register Soon

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by David Nicolai, Coordinator Institute for Ag Professionals, University of Minnesota

A reminder that the 2012 Field School for Ag Professionals will be held on July 25-26 which is a Wednesday and Thursday at the University of Minnesota Agriculture Experiment Station, St. Paul Campus, University of Minnesota. The two-day program focuses on core principles in agronomy, entomology, weed and soil sciences on the first day and builds on this foundation with timely, cutting-edge topics on the second day. A total of 12 Certified Crop Advisor Continuing Education Units will be offered for the two days of the Field School. Participants may choose to attend either day or both days of the field school. Advance registrations made before Friday, July 20th are eligible for a discount; $150 per day or $270 for both days before July 20th, after July 20th the registration tuition will be $300 for both days.

Registration for the Field School is available on-line at http://www.extension.umn.edu/AgProfessionals/fieldschool.html  The program will begin at 9:00 am (registration from 8:00-9:00 am) on Wednesday, July 25th at the University of Minnesota Plant Growth Facilities & Greenhouse Classroom, 1522 Gortner Ave on the St. Paul campus. The St. Paul Campus (located in Falcon Heights, MN next to the Minnesota State Fairgrounds at Larpenteur and Gortner Ave) is this year's site for the Field School for Ag Professional.

 

 

The first day's sessions are:

·         Herbicide Mode of Action and Crop Injury Symptoms

·         Soil Physical and Chemical Properties and their Effects on Nutrient Management

·         Soybean Aphid Management: Soybean resistance, Seed Treatments, and Natural Enemies

·         Corn and Soybean Growth, Development, and Agronomics

You will attend each of these 1.5 hour hands-on sessions. Session details are listed at the end of this announcement Certified Crop Advisor CEUs in the areas of Soil & Water, Pest Management, and Crop Management will be available. The second day program consists of multiple concurrent one-hour sessions, allowing you to obtain one Certified Crop Advisor CEU per session. You can self-select up to six different sessions from a menu of nine session topics the second day program topics include:

·         Basic and Advanced Crop Disease Diagnosis

·         What's in your Soil Test Report: What's Needed to Make Nutrient Management Decisions?

·         Agronomic Maximization of Soybean Yield and Quality

·         Corn Rootworm Resistance Update

·         Effect of Weed Removal Timing on Nitrogen Management for Corn

·         Rust Diseases in Wheat

·         Past, Present and Future Yield Improvement in Corn

·         Principles of Weed Seedling Identification

·         Bacterial Leaf Streak of Wheat: Symptoms, Spread and Management                                            

 At the Field School you'll find a hands-on, in-field program with a focus on crop and pest management diagnostic skill building in field crops. The program is geared to agronomists, crop production retailers, seed dealers, consultants, Extension educators, agriculture government agency personnel, farm managers and summer scouts.

 A key feature of the Field School is the small learning groups to enhance the learning experience. Each subject is led by experienced instructors offering personalized instruction and small group activities and enrollment is, therefore, limited to 120 so please register early. You may choose to attend either day or both days of the field school.  Detailed session descriptions and online registration can be found on the Institute for Ag Professionals website. 

 Questions about the 2012 Field School can be directed to David Nicolai, IAP Program Coordinator, via e-mail: nico0071@umn.edu or by calling 612-625-2778.

Listed below are the learning objectives for the various educational sessions for both days of the 2012 Field School:

 

 

 

First DAY SESSION DETAILS:

 

Herbicide Mode of Action and Crop Injury Symptoms

Dr. Jeff Gunsolus and Tom Hoverstad, University of Minnesota

·         Learn how different herbicides work and relate their mode of action to their respective crop injury symptoms.

·         Improve your diagnostic skills by gaining a broader understanding of crop sensitivity to various herbicides.

·         Relate herbicide mode of action to herbicide resistance management.

 

 

 

Corn and Soybean Growth, Development, and Agronomics

Dr. Jeff Coulter and Dr. Seth Naeve, University of Minnesota

·         Improve your understanding of corn and soybean growth and development, and how this affects the response of these crops to stresses and agronomic management.

·         Evaluate stand establishment problems in corn and soybean, and learn about the effects on crop development and yield.

·         Assess multiple forms of hail and wind damage on corn and soybean, and the ability of these crops to recover from such damage.

 

Soil Physical and Chemical Properties and their Effects on Nutrient Management          

Dr. Dan Kaiser and Dr. John Lamb, University of Minnesota

·         Learn how different soils vary in their particle size distribution and discuss why these differences exist

·         Examine the different materials that make up various soils and how they can affect the chemical and physical properties of soils

·         Discuss how soil physical and chemical properties can significantly affect nutrient management decisions

 

Soybean Aphid Management: Soybean resistance, Seed Treatments, and Natural Enemies

Dr. Ken Ostlie, Thelma Heidel-Baker, Megan Carter and Dr. George Heimpel, University of Minnesota 

·         Understand how Rag1 soybean aphid resistance works

·         Discuss, demonstrate, and compare performance of Rag1 resistant soybean, seed treatments, and foliar insecticides

·         Understand how aphid management options affect aphid natural enemies

·         Learn to recognize and identify soybean aphid natural enemies

 

 

SECOND DAY SESSION DETAILS:

 

Basic and Advanced Crop Disease Diagnosis

Dr. Dean Malvick and Dimitre Mollov, University of Minnesota

·         Overview of disease diagnosis which will focus on a few specific types of diseases including a root disease, a stem disease, a foliar fungal disease, and a foliar bacterial disease such as Goss's wilt on corn. 

·         Hands-on observation of corn plant samples as well as discussion and demonstration of old and new methods for field and laboratory diagnosis including new "in-field" diagnosis test methods as well as plant disease lab methods of detection.

 

 

    Principles of Weed Seedling Identification-PM

Lisa Behnken and David Nicolai, University of Minnesota

This session is designed to acquaint the learner with the skills and references needed to identify seedling broadleaf and grass weeds. Live plant seedlings and established weeds from the University of Minnesota-St. Paul Campus weed garden will be used in this hands-on session.

 

Past, Present, and Future Yield Improvement in Corn

Dr. Jeff Coulter; University of Minnesota

·         Evaluate historical and current corn varieties and hybrids;

·         Recognize the physiological factors underlying yield improvement, stress tolerance, and optimal agronomic practices; and

·         Understand future physiological and agronomic opportunities for corn yield improvement.

 

Effect of Weed Removal Timing on Nitrogen Management for Corn

Dr. Dan Kaiser and Dr. Jeff Gunsolus, University of Minnesota

·         Focus on post emergence weed management and how the time of weed removal can significantly affect the amount of nitrogen taken up by the weeds and limit N availability to corn.  

·         Evaluate the effects of weeds on N uptake in corn followed by a discussion of best management practices to prevent loss of N while maximizing profitability of N use in corn.

 

 

What's in Your Soil Test Report: What's Needed to Make Management Decisions?

Dr. Dan Kaiser and Dr John Lamb, University of Minnesota

·         Understand why and how when soil samples are submitted for analysis many labs run a series of tests and report the results differently.          

·         Factors such as cation exchange capacity may be reported but it is not very useful in making a fertilizer recommendation.                             

·         Another issue we will evaluate is how values are determined. Several MN soils will be compared using different methods for determining CEC.             

 

 

 

Corn Rootworm Resistance Update

Dr. Ken Ostlie and Trisha Franz, University of Minnesota

·         See examples of corn roots from fields where a transgenic failure occurred and learn how to rate roots in order to determine if a field may be experiencing a resistance issue.  

·         Find out how the unusually warm weather this spring may influence damage caused by corn rootworm.

·         View how planting date can affect damage amounts from corn rootworm

·         Brush up on root rating skills needed to evaluate problem fields

 

 

Agronomic Maximization of Soybean Yield and Quality

Dr. Seth Naeve, University of Minnesota

·         Assist Ag professionals to identify, study, and make comprehensive recommendations to growers regarding practices across a broad range of geographies in order to maximize yield and increase grower profitability.

·         Evaluate agronomic management systems using the latest available products purported to be yield-protecting or yield-enhancing as treatments.

·         Review and rate treatments which include: various seed treatments, foliar fertilizers-micronutrients, foliar fungicides, foliar contact herbicides as growth regulators and late season nitrogen applications

 

 

Rust Diseases in Wheat

Dr. Jochum Wiersma, University of Minnesota

·         Learn about the three rust diseases that occur on wheat: stem rust, leaf rust and stripe rust.

·         At this session students will observe & diagnose rust symptoms and will receive instruction in management tactics for the control of rust diseases in Minnesota.

 

 

Bacterial Leaf Streak of Wheat: Symptoms, Spread and Management

Rebecca Curland, and Dr. Ruth Dill-Macky University of Minnesota

·         Bacterial leaf streak of wheat and barley is an emerging disease problem in Minnesota.

·         The disease generally develops late in the season and can become quite severe during the grain filling period causing significant yield losses on some varieties.                                  

·         Participants at this session will become familiar with disease symptoms and management options for this disease.

 

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