University of Minnesota Extension
http://www.extension.umn.edu/
612-624-1222
Menu Menu

Extension > Minnesota Crop News > Archives > Manure Management Archive

Recently in the Manure Management Category

Save the Date: Nitrogen Conference on March 6

| Leave a comment

By Fabian Fernandez 

Nutrient Management Specialist

Mark your calendar for a new conference. Nitrogen: Minnesota's Grand Challenge and Compelling Opportunity will be on Friday, March 6, 2015 at the Best Western Plus Kelly Inn of St. Cloud, MN.

The conference will be focused on nitrogen management for crop producers and ag professionals. Nitrogen is essential for crop production, but many factors influence the efficient use of this nutrient in agricultural systems. Managing this nutrient effectively in Minnesota is important both for financial and environmental benefits.

The planning committee identified speakers and topics to make this conference relevant and informative on current topics directly related to nitrogen for agricultural production and environmental stewardship. There will be CCA credits available.

This is an event you don't want to miss. Additional details and registration information are forthcoming.

Larry D. Jacobson, Extension Agricultural Engineer, U of M Extension

With the harvest season fast approaching, the application of stored manure from animal facilities on the harvested fields will soon follow. This year, pork producers need to be aware of the risk of spreading Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) through equipment used to pump and land apply manure from all farms but especially those with pigs exhibiting clinical signs of the disease. PED can be spread through oral-fecal contact, manure contaminated boots, clothing, birds and wildlife, transport trailers and other equipment.

PED is a viral enteric swine ONLY disease with clinical symptoms of diarrhea, fever, vomiting, and death (age dependent). PED was first detected in the United States this spring and as of the first of September the disease had been confirmed on more than 500 swine herds in the United States. Spread of the virus continues, and it is both a good animal husbandry practice and a good neighbor policy for all pork farmers with pigs exhibiting clinical signs of PED to obtain a confirmed diagnosis and immediately establish enhanced biosecurity practices to avoid spreading the virus within their own animals and (or) to neighboring swine herds.

Because many pork producers hire commercial manure applicators to pump and land apply their manure from a farm's storage pits, tanks, and/or basins, their equipment can easily spread this virus from infected farms (barns) to uninfected farms (barns). In response to this urgent concern, the National Pork Board (NPB) along with several midwestern universities (Michigan State, Iowa State, and Minnesota) have just released a one page fact sheet listing the biosecurity recommendations that commercial manure haulers should follow to reduce the risk of spreading this virus.

The fact sheet emphasizes the need for the manure applicator to communicate closely with the pork producers when pumping manure on a farm to reduce the risk of transferring this virus by manure handling equipment either from or to the farm.

The fact sheet is available here: NPB's Biosecure Manure Pumping Protocols for PED Control. Additional PEDV resources are available at http://www.pork.org/Research/4316/PEDVResources.aspx.

Les Everett - Water Resources Center Education Coordinator, U of M. Randy Pepin and Jose A. Hernandez - Extension Educators, University of Minnesota - Extension

Using grid soil sampling to guide manure application can be a profitable investment, is the conclusion from case studies based on eight Minnesota farms. In fields where there is a history of non-uniform manure application, targeting new manure applications to areas with lower phosphorus and potassium soil test values can result in considerable economic returns above the cost of grid soil sampling. Variable rate manure applicators are not required when fields can be divided into application and no-application zones, with supplemental nitrogen fertilizer in the no-manure zones. The brief case studies are available on the University of Minnesota Extension web page for Manure Management and Air Quality http://www.manure.umn.edu, under Grid Soil Sampling for Manure Application. An introduction, the eight case studies, and a set of short video presentations based on the case studies are available at http://z.umn.edu/gridsoilsampling.

Funding for the development of these case studies was provided by the McKnight Foundation.

Nutrient Management Planner for Minnesota software, version 4.0 for M.S. Windows 7 and Access 2010 is now available on a CD from UM Extension, http://www.extension.umn.edu, at the Extension Store. NMP helps producers and their advisors plan field-specific fertilizer and manure applications that meet crop needs and agency requirements. Recommendations are consistent with current University of Minnesota fertilizer recommendations, the USDA-NRCS-Minnesota 590 (Nutrient Management) Standard, and Minnesota State 7020 Feedlot Rules. The software generates reports that meet NRCS and MPCA requirements, and that serve producers' farm management needs. The software includes a farm nutrient supply and demand calculator to determine the acres needed for manure applications. NMP V 4.0 requires a computer with MS Windows 7 and MS Access 2010. More information is at http://z.umn.edu/nmp.

By Jose A. Hernandez
Extension Educator - Nutrient Management

A new Manure Management and Air Quality Education website has been launched. The new website provides educational materials, and current research from the University of Minnesota, in the area of manure management and air quality in livestock production.

Major categories in the new website are: manure management, feedlot and manure storage, air quality, milk house wastewater, manure pathogens, manure treatment, and manure application.

The revised website includes the release of three major additions:


  • The long-standing UM Extension Bulletin "Manure Management in Minnesota" has been updated, printed, and posted on the web.

  • Results of 12 site-years of trials measuring corn yield response to time of swine manure application have been published as a research report entitled: "Swine manure application timing: Results of experiments in southern Minnesota."

  • Eight case studies of the economic and environmental response to using grid soil sampling to guide zonal manure application have been posted to the revised Manure Management and Air Quality website. These case studies will be presented in workshops this winter.

The website will also provide an events calendar with local and regional manure management educational opportunities.

This website was made possible by funding from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Section 319 Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

What's Manure Worth?

| Leave a comment

UMN Extension has developed a new web-based calculator to determine the value of manure

William F. Lazarus - Extension Economist, Jose A. Hernandez - Extension Educator, and Les Everett - Water Resources Center Education Coordinator. University of Minnesota - Extension

A new web-based tool developed by Dr. William F. Lazarus, Extension Economist and Professor in the Department of Applied Economics, is now available. The web-based calculator may be used to compare the economic value of manure from alternative manure application rates and methods. The value is based on crop nutrient needs for a specific field and crop rotation, fertilizer prices, manure hauling costs, manure type, and application method. In addition to assisting with management of current livestock and crop operations, the calculator can be useful in budgeting new facilities or evaluation of contract production through estimating the effect of manure and manure management on cash flow. The calculations can also assist crop and livestock producer estimate the value of manure that may be transferred or sold from one entity to another.

Livestock producers face uncertain markets and narrow margins. This situation motivates growers to optimize production methods, utilizing all resources including manure. In addition, an increase in the price of commercial fertilizer experienced since 2009, has heightened interest in the use of livestock manure for supplying crop nutrients and has significantly increased the value of manure as a nutrient source.

In recent years more producers have been considering the contribution of manure value to cash flow in livestock operation budgets, and seeking an appropriate market value in exchange situations between livestock producers and crop producers. More crop producers also appear to be seeking manure as a major nutrient source, either by purchasing from a livestock producer or by adding livestock to their operations, particularly swine finishing.

Determining the economic value of the nutrients in livestock manure can be tricky. Nutrients in commercial fertilizer are acquired by paying for the nutrients and a small application charge. With manure you, in effect, "acquire" nutrients by paying for the cost of application, even if you already have ownership of the manure in a storage structure.

Additionally, commercial fertilizer supplies the amount and ratio of nutrients you need or ordered. With manure, you get the amount and ratio of nutrients that it contains, which complicates the determination of a value. Even when a rate that supplies the correct amount of nitrogen is applied, the amount of phosphorous and potash applied may not match what you would have purchased commercially, and amounts applied above crop need probably have no value. In the past, manure application costs often exceeded the value of the nutrients applied. Now, in many situations, the nutrient value in the manure exceeds the cost of application.

The web-based calculator is available at http://z.umn.edu/manurevalue. For more information about manure economics please visit: http://z.umn.edu/manureworth.

Funding for the development of this tool was provided by Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Section 319 Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program from the Environmental Protection Agency.

By Daniel Kaiser
Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

U of M Nutrient Management Website

A new nutrient management website has been launched that houses most of the current fertilizer suggestions and data from the University of Minnesota. This website was made possible by funding from the Minnesota Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council and was put together through a joint effort for several researchers from the University of Minnesota who's research focuses on nutrient management issues for several crops growth throughout the state of Minnesota.  We would like to thank the AFREC program because without them this effort would not have been possible

By Jeff Vetsch and John Lamb. University of Minnesota, Southern Research and Outreach Center and Department of Soil Water and Climate.

Waseca MN, (10/1/2011) - Once soybean harvest is complete many swine farmers begin applying manure to those acres for the next year's corn crop. Manure applications in Southern Minnesota begin in early October and usually conclude by mid November. A significant proportion of the nitrogen (N) in swine finishing manure is in the ammonium-N form. If warm soil temperatures persist after application, the ammonium-N can nitrify and be susceptible to loss via leaching or denitrification. These N losses have negative agronomic and environmental implications. The University of Minnesota recommends fall fertilizer N be applied after soils are less than 50° F at the 6-inch depth. This usually occurs in late October in Southern Minnesota.

  • © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy