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August 25, 2009

Recognizing Glyphosate-Resistant Weeds: A Field ID Experience

Wednesday, September 9 ----- Plummer, MN

Meet at and depart from Plummer Co-op Creamery
(Cenex Station) 1 pm


Thursday, September 10 ----- Hawley, MN
Meet at and depart from RDO Equipment 9:30 am


Is glyphosate less effective than 10 years ago?


Can you recognize the presence of glyphosate-resistant weeds in a field?


Continue reading "Recognizing Glyphosate-Resistant Weeds: A Field ID Experience" »

Irrigated Corn Silage Plot Tour


Friday, August 28, 2009
10:30 a.m.
Dan Dreyer Farm - Ottertail City

Tour Agenda:
Forage Production and Management Update
Forage Insects Past, Present, and Future
Alfalfa/Grass Stand Management
Hybrid Evaluation and Industry Update From Seed Companies

Continue reading "Irrigated Corn Silage Plot Tour" »

August 14, 2009

Soybean Growth Stages for Pest Management Decisions

by Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator, Crops

Management decisions on whether to treat soybean aphids will be affected by the soybean growth stage in a field during the next two weeks. As plants progress to the later reproductive stages (e.g., R5, R6, R7, etc.) risk of yield loss from aphids declines. Currently, the soybean crop ranges from R3 to R5. Insecticide treatments for R5 stage soybeans may respond positively to soybean aphid treatments when populations exceed threshold, however the level of the yield response is less predictable. Early R5 treatments are more likely to realize a positive response than late R5 treatments. Treatments for aphids are generally not recommended beyond the R6 growth stage.

Continue reading "Soybean Growth Stages for Pest Management Decisions" »

July 15, 2009

A Comparison Of Aphid and Disease Management Practices in Soybeans


by Dr. Ian MacRae, U of MN Extension Entomologist


There has been increasing pressure to apply insecticide and tank mixed pesticides at lower thresholds based on claims of increased yield benefits. While increased commodity prices can stimulate the desire to decrease risk tolerance and increase the use of pesticides, this is not always a paying proposition.

Continue reading "A Comparison Of Aphid and Disease Management Practices in Soybeans" »

Time to Scout Soybean Aphids - They've Finally Arrived in the North

by Dr. Ian MacRae, U of MN Extension Entomologist


sba.jpg


.... Low populations of Soybean Aphid (SBA) have been reported throughout NW MN and NE ND. Populations are still low and generally not on more than 30% of the plants. The cooler weather will slow reproduction for a few days but it is predicted to warm up by the weekend, at which time we'll start to see some more population growth and dispersal across fields. Although most fields are well below treatment levels so far, it is time to start scouting the soybean fields, getting a handle on what populations you may have and tracking progress and population growth.

Continue reading "Time to Scout Soybean Aphids - They've Finally Arrived in the North" »

2009 Soybean Cyst Nematode Survey in the Red River Valley


by Dr. Charla Hollingsworth, U of MN Extension Plant Pathologist


In 1954, the first detection of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) occurred in North Carolina. Since that time, the nematode has become the most important disease issue of soybean in the world. Spread with soil, this microscopic roundworm continues to gain ground in Minnesota soybean-producing areas. Essentially anything that can move small particles of soil will also transport this nematode.

Continue reading "2009 Soybean Cyst Nematode Survey in the Red River Valley" »

Final Words of Caution on Wheat Midge

by Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator - Crops


A lot of wheat is now heading in NW Minnesota. In the northern most counties, degree day accumulations are just reaching the 1300 DD mark (see map), the point where 10% of female midge have emerged. Emergence will continue through 1600+ DD (90% female emergence).

Continue reading "Final Words of Caution on Wheat Midge" »

July 9, 2009

Sunflower Rust is Widespread but Developing Slowly

by Dr. Charla Hollingsworth, U of MN Extension Plant Pathologist

SNFLWR_Rust_pycnia.jpg Early lifecycle stage structures (pycnia) of sunflower rust were detected on volunteer sunflowers during early-June in Minnesota and North Dakota (Figure 1). These detections created concern because that meant:

  • the fungus was only two spore stages away from producing the spores responsible for epidemics (pycnia → aeciospores → urediospores);

  • it was much too early in the growing season to see rust developing; and

  • the fungus had overwintered in our agroecosystem in its sexual stage. A possible outcome of winter survival is the potential for genetic recombination by the pathogen where more virulence might occur on sunflower varieties grown here.
  • Continue reading "Sunflower Rust is Widespread but Developing Slowly" »

    Understanding the Risk for a Fusarium Head Blight Epidemic in Wheat

    by Dr. Charla Hollingsworth, U of MN Extension Plant Pathologist


    Crop growth stages of spring wheat are rapidly approaching early flower in some locations. This is the time of year that managers must make a decision to apply a fungicide application targeted for Fusarium head blight (FHB) management.

    Continue reading "Understanding the Risk for a Fusarium Head Blight Epidemic in Wheat" »

    Northwest Research and Outreach Center - Crops and Soils Day

    Northwest Research and Outreach Center - Crookston

    Crops and Soils Day

    Friday, July 17, 2009 8:00 A.M.

    Continue reading " Northwest Research and Outreach Center - Crops and Soils Day" »

    July 1, 2009

    Weed Control in Roundup Ready Sugarbeet

    by Dr. Jeff Stachler, Sugar beet Weed Scientist
    U of MN Extension / NDSU Extension

    For those growers unable to apply glyphosate to Roundup Ready sugarbeet for the first time due to wet soil conditions, apply the maximum rate of glyphosate allowed. The maximum glyphosate rate for Roundup Ready sugarbeet is 1.125 pounds acid equivalent per acre (lbs ae/A). This equates to 32 fluid ounces per acre (fl oz/A) of Roundup-branded products, 48 fl oz/A of 3.0 pounds acid equivalent per gallon (lbs ae/gal) products, and 39 fl oz/A of 3.7 lbs ae/gal products. This glyphosate rate can only be applied up to the eight-leaf stage of sugarbeet. This rate should be applied to any field with weeds greater than two to three inches in height or with difficult to control species such as wild buckwheat, lambsquarters, and common and giant ragweed.

    Continue reading "Weed Control in Roundup Ready Sugarbeet " »

    Watch for Midge as Wheat Approaches Heading Stage

    by Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator - Crops

    There could be about 70% of the region's wheat acres at the heading stage when wheat midge are emerging, based on those acres being planted in the high risk window (Figure 1). Heading is the growth stage when wheat is attractive to female midge for egg laying, and the time the plant is most susceptible to injury from midge larval feeding. Though midge populations have been small in recent years, this will be the most wheat acres we have had that are susceptible to midge in many years.

    Continue reading "Watch for Midge as Wheat Approaches Heading Stage" »

    Aphids in Small Grains - June 29, 2009

    by Dr. Ian MacRae, U of MN Extension Entomologist

    There have been some reports of bird cherry-oat aphids (Figure 1 and Figure 2) in small grains in NW and WC MN over the last week. The populations I've seen are at very low numbers. Add to this, the recent rainy weekend will likely have had a significant impact on those aphid populations, but it's still a good idea to scout for aphids in small grains. The most damaging aphid populations are ones that reach threshold around flag leaf stage, if populations are at or near threshold at this time, delaying treatment until heading may cost you yield.

    Continue reading "Aphids in Small Grains - June 29, 2009" »

    Bacterial leaf stripe of wheat: Something to keep in mind

    by Dr. Charla Hollingsworth, U of MN Extension Plant Pathologist

    Bacterial leaf stripe is a disease that can usually be found on wheat in the Red River Valley (RRV) later as crop growth stages progress. The disease (caused by a Xanthomonas sp.) can develop and become severe rapidly after the crop reaches the heading growth stage. Bacterial leaf stripe (BLS) can cause significant yield losses on some varieties. Like other disease issues, development is dependent on weather conditions and the presence of susceptible plant hosts. Epidemics of BLS occurred in the RRV during 2005 and again in 2008.

    Continue reading "Bacterial leaf stripe of wheat: Something to keep in mind" »

    June 24, 2009

    12th ANNUAL MINNESOTA CANOLA PRODUCTION CENTRE FIELD DAY...

    Continue reading "12th ANNUAL MINNESOTA CANOLA PRODUCTION CENTRE FIELD DAY..." »

    Soybean Rust: What will this year bring?

    by Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator - Crops

    Soybean rust was found in 392 counties in the United States in 2008. This is the highest number of counties reporting the disease since it was first discovered in the continental U.S. in 2004. Soybean growers in Alabama were encouraged to use fungicides on at risk beans in late August, many neighboring states reported mostly low infection levels throughout the month of September as the crop matured.

    Continue reading "Soybean Rust: What will this year bring?" »

    Alfalfa Weevil: Coming on Strong in West Central MN

    by Doug Holen, Extension Educator - Crops, Fergus Falls
    and Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator - Crops, Moorhead

    Just a quick note to report a significant outbreak of alfalfa weevil in WC MN. It escalated over the weekend with a lot of spraying starting on Monday. We have fields in all stages with 1st crop still standing, cut alfalfa in windrow for some time, and 16" of 2nd crop regrowth. All fields have been hit hard. All alfalfa growers in west central MN should be checking for possible infestations.

    Continue reading "Alfalfa Weevil: Coming on Strong in West Central MN" »

    June 18, 2009

    Sunflower Rust Fungus is Alive and Well in Minnesota and North Dakota

    By Dr. Charla Hollingsworth, Plant Pathologist, U of Minnesota Extension
    and Dr. Sam Markell, Plant Pathologist, NDSU Extension Service

    This past week, the fungus that causes rust on sunflower, Puccinia helianthi, was identified on wild and volunteer sunflowers in Minnesota and North Dakota. The rust fungus is known as a "macrocyclic" pathogen because it produces five successive types of spores during its lifecycle. While all five types of spores are produced on sunflower, only one type is responsible for causing rust epidemics.

    Continue reading "Sunflower Rust Fungus is Alive and Well in Minnesota and North Dakota" »

    Wireworms in Small Grains

    by Dr. Ian MacRae, Extension Entomologist

    I've received reports of wireworms in small grains this season - not surprising this year given that wireworm tend to be more active in cooler conditions. There are several species of wireworms in the Red River Valley and although they're usually neither a frequent nor wide-spread problem in the RRV, when they do occur, damage can be quite significant even leading to a total field loss.

    Continue reading "Wireworms in Small Grains" »

    Controlling Canada thistle with Milestone

    By Carlyle Holen, IPM Specialist, U of Minnesota Extension

    What is the optimum time to treat Canada thistle (Figure 1) in non-cropland with Milestone? Based on field trials at Ada in 2007 the window for application is pretty wide and perhaps a better way to frame the question might be: What is the least effective time to treat Canada thistle? In the Ada trials, applications were made at two week intervals from June 1 to August 23 (Table 1). We found new shoots are initiated on a nearly continuous basis during the growing season with a large 'flush' of new rosettes in the spring and in late summer /early fall after older plants have finished dispersing seed. During the spring 'flush' new stems are rapidly added by the extensive root system and a single plant may have dozens of individual, interconnected stems. Figure 2 shows the increase in Canada thistle stem number, from June 1 to August 23 from untreated plots. In the two week period from June 1 to June 15 there was a 44% increase in stem number and from June 15 to June 29 the increase was 18%. The speed of shoot emergence is driven initially by soil temperature and continues at a fairly rapid pace until plants begin to flower. With a continuous emergence of new Canada thistle shoots you will find stems that are blooming next to ones that are just emerging. When staging plants make your assessment on the most advanced plants in the patches.

    Continue reading "Controlling Canada thistle with Milestone" »

    Cool Temperatures Delay Alfalfa Weevil: Time to Scout Fields in NW MN

    By Phillip Glogoza, Extension Educator - Crops

    The cool temperatures have delayed alfalfa weevil population development in the region. In west central MN, first cut got underway two weeks ago. As we move northwest, first cut may just be beginning for some. In some cases, cutting alfalfa may have removed significant eggs laid in stems, while in other sites young larvae are feeding in the growing terminals, whether it is regrowth or uncut alfalfa.

    Continue reading "Cool Temperatures Delay Alfalfa Weevil: Time to Scout Fields in NW MN" »

    June 12, 2009

    Now is The Time to Evaluate Stands

    The challenging spring in Northwest Minnesota has forced many to seed their wheat and barley under less than ideal conditions and into poor seedbeds. Now is the time to evaluate how well your seeding operation went and what the attained stands are. This is important as the decision about inputs further into the season will depend on the yield potential that is left.

    Continue reading "Now is The Time to Evaluate Stands" »

    June 11, 2009

    Temperatures Affect Glyphosate Activity

    Temperatures over the last month have fluctuated greatly. Cold temperatures two weeks ago caused a reduction in glyphosate activity. Individual plants of lambsquarters and annual smartweed species where not completely controlled at a research location while other plants and other species were completely controlled. Cold weather in early June of 2008 also caused a reduction in glyphosate activity. The cold weather last week and early this week will likely cause glyphosate applications to be less effective until warmer temperatures persist.

    Continue reading "Temperatures Affect Glyphosate Activity " »

    Soybean Planting Date and Delayed Planting

    We are into the fourth year of a soybean date planting trial at Crookston investigating how two different relative maturity soybean varieties respond to planting date. Results for 2006 - 2008 show maximum soybean yield when planting in the May 1 – 15th window of opportunity. Previous planting date trials from the University of Minnesota also show an optimum planting window of May 10 – 20 to achieve maximum yield (Table 1).

    Continue reading "Soybean Planting Date and Delayed Planting" »

    "Understanding Noxious Weed Control in Pastures, CRP, Roadsides & Gravel Source Areas"

    The control of perennial noxious weeds can often be troublesome for farmers, CRP landowners, county and township road/weed department officials, and other land managers. Thanks to modern technology and a better understanding of biological control methods, land and roadside managers have new and effective tools to control such problem weeds. This plot tour and educational programplans to address these topics.

    Continue reading ""Understanding Noxious Weed Control in Pastures, CRP, Roadsides & Gravel Source Areas" " »

    Orange Wheat Blossom Midge: Vigilance is in order

    Orange wheat blossom midge (Figure 1) as a wheat pest has been off the front page as a major production problem in NW MN for many years. Populations in the region have been small enough that significant outbreaks and associated yield losses have been of small concern. However, we learned in the mid-90’s that given the right circumstances, this insect can increase its population rapidly and cause major yield losses in a very short time frame.

    Continue reading "Orange Wheat Blossom Midge: Vigilance is in order" »