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A Closer Look at Herbicide Rotation Restrictions

By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator in Crops

What herbicides were applied earlier in the growing season can significantly influence the decision of what to do in fields or areas of a field where the original crop was flooded or hailed out.  Planting some kind of a crop can help reduce erosion potential as well as reduce the risk of fallow syndrome (see http://z.umn.edu/fallowsyndrome).  However, options can be limited if a herbicide used previously in the growing season has rotational or plant-back restrictions listed on the label.

By Lizabeth Stahl and Lisa Behnken, Extension Educators in Crops  

Access to results for many of the U of MN crops research trials conducted across the state has now become streamlined with the launch of the new, U of MN Extension Crops Research website.  This one-stop shop can be accessed through the U of MN Extension Crops webpage at www.extension.umn.edu/crops under "Research Reports".

The website contains results for small plot and on-farm crops research and demonstration trials conducted across Southern MN from 2003 to 2013.  You can also access research results for crops trials conducted at Research and Outreach Centers located across the state by clicking on the respective link.  Statewide results for weed science research can be accessed through the "Applied Weed Science" link, and results for the Minnesota hybrid and variety trials can be accessed through the "Minnesota Field Crops Variety Trials" link. 

The Research Reports webpage supplements U of MN Crops websites such as the "Corn", "Soybean", "Small Grains", "Forages", or "Sugarbeets" websites, or the "Nutrient Management", "Pest Management", "Ag Drainage", "Climate and Weather", and "Tillage" websites, where you can find research-based information and resources to help with specific crops-related decisions. 

By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator in Crops

Benefits of a preemergence (PRE) herbicide application in soybean were demonstrated through the "PRE Challenge" - a series of on-farm research and demonstration trials conducted across southern MN in 2012 and 2013. In these University of Minnesota Extension trials, made possible through financial support of the Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council, cooperators compared a postemergence-only herbicide program to a program that included a PRE herbicide application.

By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator in Crops

Does glyphosate perform as well today as it did when you first used it?  When producers were asked this question at University of Minnesota Private Pesticide Applicator Training sessions across southern Minnesota in 2014, 87% of the respondents said "No".  This percentage is up significantly from 2009, when 55% of respondents answered "No" to this question.  Increasing issues with resistance to glyphosate is likely, at least in part, behind reported reductions in weed control.  To address issues of reduced weed control with glyphosate, diversification is key. 

By Lizabeth Stahl and Lisa Behnken, Extension Educators in Crops

University of Minnesota Extension has recently launched a U of MN Extension Crops YouTube video site. It can be accessed through the newly updated U of MN Extension Crops webpage at www.extension.umn.edu/crops under "Social Media".

U of M Conservation Tillage Conference in St. Cloud, Feb 18-19

How-to information, expert advice, practical tips

By Jodi DeJong-Hughes, Extension Educator - Crops and Conservation Tillage Conference Coordinator

 

Roll up your sleeves for some practical, hands-on information that will save you soil, time, fuel -- and money. Conservation tillage is the focus of the ninth annual University of Minnesota Extension Conservation Tillage Conference and trade show Feb. 17 and 18, at the Holiday Inn and Suites, St. Cloud, MN. This conference emphasizes proven farmer experience and applied science. Straight from the trenches, learn how heavier, colder soils aren't necessarily the challenge they're made out to be. And, what have long-time no-tillers and reduced-tillage farmers learned that could spare you the same lessons?

Weed Management in Prevented Planting Acres

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By Jeffrey L. Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist - Weed Science

The wet weather pattern this spring and early summer has left a significant number of acres, especially in southeastern MN, unplanted.  Current estimates in southeastern MN project 30% of the tillable acres have not been planted and on many of these acres weeds such as giant ragweed, common lambsquarters and waterhemp are thriving. 

Although weeds are beneficial from an erosion control perspective their rapid growth will make seedbed preparation for planting cover crops very difficult and weed seed production potential will challenge even the best weed management tactics available in 2014.

Volunteer Corn: It's More Than a Weed Control Issue

By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops

Volunteer corn has become one of the more prevalent weeds in fields across the Midwest. Conditions experienced in 2012, however, have combined to create almost a perfect storm in some fields for potentially high volunteer corn populations in 2013.

By Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops, and Jeff Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist - Weed Science

With very tight windows of opportunity to plant this year, preemergence herbicides may not have been applied as planned.  Application of a residual herbicide prior to planting or emergence of the crop, in both corn and soybean, is a great weed management strategy overall and also a key tool in managing against herbicide resistance.  What are some of our options if soybeans emerged before a preemergence herbicide application was made?   

U of MN Field Crop Trials Bulletin Available

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By Lizabeth Stahl

The University of MN Field Crop Trials Bulletin is now available in print and electronic forms. The new publication, dated January 2013, provides results from U of MN trials conducted in 2012 across the state. The varieties tested are from both public and private breeding programs and include U of MN developed forage, grain, and oilseed crop varieties.

By Liz Stahl, Extension Educator - Crops and Jeff Coulter, Extension Corn Agronomist

Results of the 2012 University of Minnesota corn grain and silage trials are available online at the following links:

2012 Corn Grain Hybrid Trial Results: http://z.umn.edu/corn2012

2012 Corn Silage Hybrid Trial Results: http://z.umn.edu/cornsilage2012

Results are based on replicated trials conducted at multiple locations across Minnesota to provide growers and agronomists with an unbiased source of information on hybrid performance. 

In September, 2011, University of Minnesota Extension, partnered with NDSU Extension, brought you the Tires, Traction, and Compaction Field Day near Fergus Falls, MN. There are now four videos highlighting the key messages presented during the day. Each video takes you to the unique soil pits constructed for that day to illustrate soil structure and effects of equipment traffic on soils. Each video is under six minutes yet captures the field experience for those unable to attend. They represent a great refresher for the 200+ participants who were there.

Spider Mites in Soybeans

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We've been getting calls about spider mites in soybeans, not surprising given our high temps and the dry conditions in some locations. As temps get into the 90's, spider mite reproduction and development rates increase significantly. Drought also exacerbates spider mite populations, and when drought conditions are relieved by rain, spider mite populations may not necessarily decrease. Consequently, even after drought conditions pass, best to continue scouting for spider mites damage.

Spider mites are tiny and only large females are visible to the naked eye (unless you've got really good eyesight!). The best way to see spider mites is to shake a plant over a piece of white paper - any moving pieces of dirt are likely spider mites... So to scout for something that small, it's best to look for damage. Spider mite damage will first appear as small yellow spots (stippling) on lower leaves. There is currently no solid treatment threshold in soybeans, but If stippling reaches mid-canopy leaves, a treatment is likely necessary. Pyrethroids may flare spider mite populations, spreading mites and increasing their populations.

A good source for information on spider mite biology, scouting and thresholds was prepared last year by Bruce Potter and Ken Ostlie and is available at:

http://www.soybeans.umn.edu/crop/insects/spider_mites.htm

Keep scouting!

By Dean Malvick

With most of the soybean and corn crop emerged and growing across Minnesota - it is a good time to assess fields for seedling disease problems and the potential benefits or failures of seed treatments.  The recent fluctuating temperatures and abundant rainfall that resulted in surplus topsoil moisture in about 21% of the state last week (USDA-NASS data) have created good conditions for seedling diseases and root infection by a complex mix of pathogens in many fields.  Scattered problems with seedling diseases have been reported.

John A. Lamb and Daniel E. Kaiser
Soil Fertility Specialists

Nitrogen is important for corn growth. This has been a concern on growers' minds since March. First concern was with the poor tillage conditions last fall. Did the nitrogen applied stay in the soil. We attempted to answer that question in a March 18 E-news. At the time of that E-news, drought was the weather condition on everyone's mind. Now with the record rainfalls, there are concerns if nitrogen has been lost to leaching or denitrification.

Volunteer Corn - An Issue in Corn and Soybean

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By Liz Stahl and Jeff Coulter

Growers are finding high populations of volunteer corn in their fields this spring.  Factors likely contributing to this include lodging in many fields last fall due to poor stalk quality and drought conditions, and higher harvest losses due to low grain moisture at harvest.  Other factors that can lead to high populations of volunteer corn the following year include storm damage and ear droppage.  The question arises:  When are populations of volunteer corn high enough to warrant control?  

Written by: Dr. Jeff Stachler, University of Minnesota and North Dakota State University and edited by Al Cattanach, Mark Bredehoeft, and Mike Metzger

Questions from sugarbeet growers have been coming in to Extension and Sugarbeet Cooperative Ag Staff about how to properly manage glyphosate-resistant waterhemp. The three Sugarbeet Cooperatives and Jeff Stachler recently met to determine the best strategy to manage glyphosate-resistant waterhemp in Roundup Ready sugarbeet.

Conservation Tillage Conference, Rochester MN, Feb 7-8 2012

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Learn how conservation tillage can save soil, time, fuel -- and money.

University of Minnesota Extension will host the seventh annual Conservation Tillage Conference and tradeshow Feb. 7 and 8, at the International Event Center in Rochester, MN.

The day-and-a-half-long conference will provide practical, how-to information on nearly every aspect of conservation tillage. Learn how conservation tillage can save soil, time, fuel -- and money. Besides saving valuable soil resources, conservation tillage has been proven to save $25-45/ac in tillage costs. And that's not including your time.

The day-and-a-half-long conference will provide practical, how-to information on nearly every aspect of conservation tillage.

"Whether you are an experienced steward looking to fine-tune what you are doing, a crop consultant who helps growers, or a novice looking to get your feet wet, you should put this conference on your calendar now," says Jodi DeJong-Hughes, Minnesota Extension tillage specialist and conference coordinator.

Experts from the University of Minnesota, neighboring states will present the results of extensive research comparing tillage systems, including strip tillage. In addition, experienced conservation tillage farmers will answer questions and provide management tips.

Conference topics include:


  • Precision Ag solutions

  • Weed species shift and control

  • Nutrient management in high residue systems

  • Strip intercropping management

  • Soil health with reduced till systems

  • Vendor Sessions: Learn about new equipment, cover crops and technology


The popular "Farmer Panel" will be back again, offering practical insights and management tips from experienced northern strip tillers and ridge tillers.

Also back is "Beer & Bull," your chance to pick the brains of other farmers, consultants and researchers in a relaxed, informal setting.

The conference will open with a provocative keynote speech from Robert Recker: "Yield, Profitability, and Sustainability: Where to go from here?" Bob is the owner of Cedar Valley Innovation and a retired John Deere engineer, researching strip intercropping. He studies corn growth on a row by row basis trying to unlock the secrets of using technology and the sun to farm smarter.

The Conservation Tillage Conference runs from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tues., Feb. 7th, and from 8:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Wed., Feb. 8th. The tradeshow will be open both days.

The registration fee is $150 per person, which includes nine continuing education units (CEUs). An early bird fee of $120 per person is offered for those registering by Jan. 25, 2012.

More information, including schedules, maps, contacts and exhibitor registration is available at www.TillageConference.com. Or contact Jodi DeJong-Hughes at 320-815-4112 or dejon003@umn.edu.

Now is the time to develop a plan and take control of herbicide-resistant weeds before they take control of you. Due to the long-term exposure to glyphosate in the corn and soybean cropping system, we are now in a situation where the probability of finding a glyphosate-resistant giant or common ragweed or waterhemp is high.

Soybean College: Addressing Soybean Production and Management

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Soybean College

on the campus of University of Minnesota - Crookston
Crookston, Minnesota

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

8:30 a.m. to 3:10 p.m.
(Registration begins at 8 a.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center)

click here for a copy of the Soybean College 2011 Brochure for registration information

Weeds: END OF SEASON WEED CONTROL REMINDERS

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written by Dr. Jeff Stachler, Weed Scientist, UMN and NDSU

Scouting fields for weeds throughout the growing season is extremely important to maintaining herbicide effectiveness and planning for future weed control decisions. Scout fields now and at harvest to determine the effectiveness of this season's weed control practices. If weeds are present now, determine why they are present. If weeds are present due to herbicide resistance, then weed control and cropping practices must be different next season and beyond.

What does soil quality mean? Why is it so important? How do we measure it and how can we impact soil quality with our management practices? Hear experts from the University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, and the USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service address these questions and more at the "Soil Quality Workshop". This program will be held at two locations: Monday, September 12 at the West Central Research and Outreach Center in Morris, and Tuesday, September 13 at the Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca. Each workshop will start with check-in at 8:00, with the program running from 8:30 to 4:30. This program is sponsored by U of MN Extension, The Ohio State University, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education.

Tires, Traction, and Compaction Field Day

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University of Minnesota Extension is proud to partner with NDSU Extension to bring you Tires, Traction, and Compaction Field Day on September 1, 2011 south of Fergus Falls, MN. Registration for the day starts at 9:00 am and discussion and demonstrations will continue until 2:30. The event will be held rain or shine.

Take Control of Waterhemp Field Tour

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Wednesday - July 6, 2011


3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

Dinner provided at 6:00 PM


Whom should attend? Sugarbeet and Soybean Growers, Consultants, Agronomists, Retailers, and Others

What is the tour about? Viewing plots for Managing glyphosate-resistant waterhemp throughout the crop rotation, especially sugarbeet and soybean.


Author: Dr. Jeff Stachler U of MN Extension and NDSU Agronomist - Sugarbeet/Weed Science

Sugarbeets have emerged or are beginning to emerge. That means it is time to begin postemergence herbicide applications to sugarbeet. Timing of the first postemergence herbicide application is the MOST critical weed management tactic, regardless of the type of sugarbeet planted.

By Jeff Stachler, Jeff Gunsolus and Rich Zollinger

Waterhemp is an annual weed species in the pigweed family that is capable of producing greater than 1 million seeds per plant and due to a limited number of effective herbicides, especially in sugarbeet and soybean, is difficult to control compared to most weed species.  In addition to the production of large quantities of seeds, continual germination throughout the growing season and an increased frequency of herbicide-resistant biotypes adds to the degree of difficulty in keeping this weed species under control.  The good news is that the longevity of waterhemp seeds in the seedbank is relatively short compared to most species (1 to 12% survival after 4 years), meaning complete control (zero seed production) of all plants over a three to four year time period should significantly reduce the waterhemp seed bank densities, allowing the farmer to take control of this difficult weed problem.

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