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Extension > Yard and Garden News > Archives > October 2013 Archives

October 2013 Archives

Plant Video Library 2013 cont.

Karl Foord - Extension Educator, Horticulture


Click on the link to see the video with host Dr. Mary Meyer, Professor of Horticulture




Karl Foord


Photo 1: Indian Warrior Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii 'Indian Warrior')





Karl Foord


Photo 2: Lord Snowden Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii 'Lord Snowden')





Karl Foord


Photo 3: Blue Heaven Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium 'Minnblue A')





Karl Foord


Photo 4: Carousel Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium 'Carousel')





Karl Foord


Photo 5: Tall Verbena (Verbena bonariensis)


Tall Verbena

Big Bluestem

Characteristics of Big Bluestem

Identifying Big Bluestem

Little Bluestem

Fruit flies common now

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist

Jeff Hahn, University of Minnesota

Photo 1: Look for red eyes when identifying fruit flies, although the color dulls after they die.

Fruit flies are common problems during the fall. They are associated with a variety of fermenting, moist, relatively undisturbed organic material, such as overripe fruits and vegetables.

Most fruit flies have red eyes which help to identify them. They also have a brownish body and a dark colored abdomen. There are other small-sized flies, such as fungus gnats, moth flies, and humpbacked flies, that can be confused with fruit flies. The control varies with the type of fly that is found so it is very important to correctly the insect you are seeing.

The best control of fruit flies is to find the source of the infestation and remove it. This often takes detective work to locate the problem as many times it is not obvious. It is tempting to just spray or kill the adults that are seen. However, as long as a food sources remains, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to get ahead of the problem and eliminate all of the flies.

For more information, see Fruit Flies.

In this issue:

The video Cicada Killer Wasps has been removed at the request of the presenter. I apologize for any inconvenience.

Impatiens Downy Mildew - Part I: The Disease

Impatiens Downy Mildew - Part II: Management

Plant Video Library 2014 cont.

the video on American Bittersweet has been removed for editing. I apologize for any inconvenience.

Pale Purple Coneflower

Trumpet Vine

Mexican Sunflower

Bugbane or Black Snakeroot

Nodding Wild Onion

Great Blue Lobelia

Flowering Spurge

Pachysandra procumbens

Revised videos from the last issue of Yard and Garden News

Tall Boneset revised

Jewelweed revised


Editors note:
Photos of flowers were added to the above videos posted in the September 15 issue of Y&G News. Thumbnail photos of the other videos have also been added to this issue.


In a followup to Part I on Impatiens Downy Mildew, Extension Educator Michelle Grabowski discusses management of the disease.




Michelle Grabowski


Photo 1: Sporangia of the pathogen Plasmopara obducens that causes impatiens downy mildew


Impatiens Downy Mildew Part II: Management

In this highly informative video, Extension Educator Michelle Grabowski explains the symptoms of this disease and how to identify it.




Michelle Grabowski


Photo 1: Early stages of the disease Impatiens Downy Mildew (Plasmopara obducens)





Michelle Grabowski


Photo 2: Sporangia of Plasmopara obducens found on the underside of the leaf of an impatiens plant carrying the disease Impatiens Downy Mildew



Impatiens Downy Mildew

Plant Video Library 2014 cont.

Karl Foord - Extension Educator, Horticulture


Click on the link to see the video with host Dr. Mary Meyer, Professor of Horticulture




Karl Foord


Photo 2: Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) on left and Pale Purple Coneflower (Echinacea pallida on right


Karl Foord

Photo 3: Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans




Karl Foord


Photo 4: Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia





Karl Foord


Photo 5: Bugbane (Actaea racemosa


Karl Foord

Photo 6: Nodding Wild Onion (Allium cernuum




Karl Foord


Photo 7: Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica





Karl Foord


Photo 8: Flowering Spurge (Euphorbia corollata





Karl Foord


Photo 9: Allegheny Spurge (Pachysandra procumbens


Pale Purple Coneflower

Trumpet Vine

Mexican Sunflower

Bugbane or Black Snakeroot

Nodding Wild Onion

Great Blue Lobelia

Flowering Spurge

Pachysandra procumbens

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