April 25, 2014

Course offering

Dear Professor Turner,

I hope your semester is going well! I just wanted to share some information with you about Stats Camp this Summer. This is the last Summer that Dr. Little will be holding Stats Camp in Lawrence, Kansas. Registration is in full swing and the Early Bird Discount ends this month.
This coming June we have 9 different courses being offered. Please visit the webpage at statscamp.org for more information on the courses, a brief syllabus for each, and registration information. Additional information is also in the attached flyer.
Please feel free to share this information with your students and colleagues.
If you are interested in attending or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me or Beth Grandfield at bethg@ku.edu.

Kindest regards,
Matt Woodard

Administrative Associate

Office of Institutional Research & Planning, Professional Record Online

University of Kansas

Email: mwoodard@ku.edu

Posted by hard0158 at 4:17 PM

May 12, 2010

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Summer 2010

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students' lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student's situation. Students from previous terms consistently report the class as "life-changing" and "meaningful." Many say, "It should be required of all students at the University." and "It was the best course I have ever taken at the University of Minnesota."

The concentrated summer schedule offers an "immersion experience" in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall Emerson, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693 (marsh008@umn.edu). Fees vary for graduate program, undergraduate and continuing education non-degree status. Greatly reduced rates apply for senior citizens. Traditional graded, as well as audited or "S/N" enrollment status options are available.

Dates/Location: June 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, and 25 from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and Saturday June 19 from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Class will be held on the University of Minnesota St. Paul campus in a Classroom Office Building room to be announced.

Posted by rutka005 at 2:29 PM

September 18, 2009

1 Credit classes offered in fall 2009 and spring 2010

This is a list Chanta Fagin put together of 1 credit classes that CSPP students may be interested in.

Fall 2009
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - CAPY

CAPY 5660 ADHD Throughout the Life Span: Perspectives on Diagnosis, Assessment, and Developmental Course
(Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: CAPY 5620, CAPY 5669; prereq Upper div)
Class # 23307 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (11/07/2009 - 11/08/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , August,Gerald , 1 credit , Instructor provides class materials to students on first day of class
CAPY 5666 Aggression and Conduct Problems in Children and Adolescent
Class # 28567 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (10/24/2009 - 10/25/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Bloomquist PhD,Michael Leonard , 1 credit , instructor will provide material for class
CAPY 5671 Suicide Prevention: Examining What Interventions May Alter Suicide Risk
Class # 35873 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 04:30 P.M. , Su (09/27/2009 - 09/27/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie , 08:30 A.M. - 04:30 P.M. , Su (10/04/2009 - 10/04/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie , 1 credit , materials are given to students on first day of class - videotape

Spring 2010
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - CAPY

CAPY 5623 Assessment and Treatment Interventions: Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents
Class # 67593 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Su (01/19/2010 - 05/07/2010) , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie, Layne,Ann Elizabeth , 1 credit , Class materials will be distributed on the day of class. ,
5 seat(s) reserved for non-PSEO, non-admitted student
CAPY 5630 Workshop: Psychotherapy in Children and Adolescents
Class # 81779 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (01/19/2010 - 05/07/2010) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Bloomquist PhD,Michael Leonard , 1 credit , Class materials will be given on the first day of class ,
5 seat(s) reserved for non-PSEO, non-admitted student

Posted by rutka005 at 11:03 PM

December 31, 2008

Classes

Check out this class--CSPP student Angela Browder suggests that it could be a great learning opportunity for TAs and/or future faculty.
---

To U of MN graduate students;

The Office of Information Technology's Digital Media Center would like to invite graduate students to participate in our redesigned digital teaching course (formerly the TAWeb Certification Course). This 2-credit course on web-based teaching and learning is offered in partnership with the School of Nursing as NURS 5113, and will be team-taught by learning technology specialists in OIT. Participants will explore a variety of established and emerging academic technologies through a process that combines experimentation and best practices to create effective, technology-rich learning environments. Open to all graduate students, NURS 5113 meets during the semester from 9:05 to 11am on Thursdays. The course offers technology skill building and pedagogical instruction in a blended learning format that involves both face-to-face and online learning experiences. For more information about this course, please contact Brad Cohen, cohenb@umn.edu.

Regards,

Brad Cohen

--
Bradley A. Cohen, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Digital Media Center
Coordinator for Curriculum Development
Office of Information Technology
612-626-0282
cohenb@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 11:33 AM

December 12, 2008

Classes

CSPH 5555 -- Body and Movement-Based Therapies

The following course may be of interest to your students – please forward. It is available to upper level undergrads and grads.

Thanks!
Carla

CSPH 5555 – Introduction To Body and Movement-Based Therapies

This course will cover the basic theories and approaches of selected Somatic Therapies, including dance, movement and body-based therapies.

Students will learn historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement, dance and somatic re-patterning; demonstrations of specific techniques and application of techniques to specific populations and settings.

The experiential part of the course will include individual, partner and group exercises intended to embody and deepen the topics covered in the class.

Instructor: Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb, CMA, MFA, ADTR

Time and date: Thurs 4:40 – 6:30 PM, 1/20 – 5/8/2009.

Please contact Carla Mantel for registration information: cmantel@umn.edu

Please contact Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb for curriculum information: loebx001@umn.edu


Carla Mantel
Student Services and Academic Programs Coordinator
Center for Spirituality and Healing
Academic Health Center
C593 Mayo Memorial Building, MMC 505
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: 612-624-5166
Fax: 612-626-5280
Email: cmantel@umn.edu

***************************************************************************************************************************************

Spring 2009

CPsy 8360 Seminar: Child Maltreatment

Dante Cicchetti, Ph.D.
Institute of Child Development
Hartup Room 172
Tuesdays, 1:30 to 4 PM

This course will provide students with an overview of the far-reaching effects of child maltreatment from a multiple-levels-of-analysis developmental psychopathology perspective by a world-renowned expert in the field. The course begins with a historical perspective of the study of child maltreatment. Child maltreatment will be defined and cultural and sampling issues, along with intergenerational abuse, will be studied in the beginning weeks. In the following weeks students will study the effects of child abuse on attachment, emotion recognition and emotion regulation, self-development, peer relationships, adaptation to school, memory, behavior problems and psychopathology, resilience, biological sequelae, and genetics. In the final two weeks of the course, students will study research-informed preventive interventions for maltreating families and their offspring, along with future directions for research on this important topic.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:06 AM

November 21, 2008

Classes

Colleagues,

Being individuals who may have an interest in families and family issues, we wanted to let you know about upcoming Special Topics that we are offering this Spring 2009 - registration information is below the course description:

CI 5900 Special Topics in Family, Youth, and Community
Sec 001 - Parents as Couples/Couples as Parents
Sec 003 - Creating Curriculum from Community Settings
Sec 004 - Fatherhood
Sec 006 - Reflections on Family Life

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Sec 001: Parents as Couples/Couples as Parents
1 Credit Registration #: 72330; Instructors: Ted Bowman and Beth Magistad; Saturday, Jan 24, 2009 9:00 am-4:30 pm; Saturday, Feb 07, 2009 9:00 am-4:30 pm

Parents have many roles: children, spouses/partners, siblings, friends, employee, community volunteer . . . the list could go on. In much of parent/family education, primary attention has been given to the role of parenting. In this class, the intersection of two family roles will receive scrutiny and attention: the roles of partner or spouse and of being a parent. The course is designed for parent and family educators in school, community, corporate, and religious settings who work with parents that are also part of a couple relationship. The emphasis of the course will be on working with these people in groups or individual sessions.

*************************************************************

Sec 003: Creating Curriculum From Community Settings

3 Credits Registration #: 74478; Instructor: Robert Shumer; Wednesdays, Spring 2009; Jan 24 through May 8, 2009; 4:40 pm-7:20 pm

Most curriculum courses teach you how to develop curriculum for a specific discipline or subject. They provide goals and learning activities to accomplish those goals. In this course we reverse the process and teach you how to build curriculum from community experiences based on interest. We start with an interest—e.g., fishing, travel, or sports—then build courses around the experiences, covering all the academic subjects found in school and college. You pick the topic or interest area and you explore the learning as you build your own curriculum.

*************************************************************

Sec 004: Fatherhood (online course)
1 Credits Registration #: 74480; Instructor: Chris Buzzetta; Internet Delivered; Five Weeks - Feb 6, through March 13, 2009; Discussion Boards - Fridays-Tuesdays; Live Chats - Thursdays 7:00 pm-7:45 pm

Fathers play unique roles in developmental outcomes for children. Especially prevalent are their impact on social development, cognitive development, and academic achievement. These roles include dad as: 1) economic provider, 2) friend and playmate, 3) caregiver, 4) teacher and role model, 5) monitor and disciplinarian, 6) protector, 7) advocate, and 8) resource. We begin to see fatherhood in its own light apart from motherhood; dads are not just substitute moms. This course will explore the father-child relationship, and participants will explore: attachment theories in relation to fathers, topics of diversity, changing perspectives on masculinity and gender roles, and single fatherhood. They will also discover ways the father-child relationship can be fostered within educational settings.

*************************************************************

Sec 006: Reflections on Family Life
3 Credits Registration #: 76156; Instructor: Lynn Englund; Thursdays, Spring 2009; Jan 20 through May 8, 2009; 4:40 pm-7:20 pm

This course is intended for students who are interested in exploring and reflecting on the richness, complexity, and diversity of family-life experiences and critically examining some of the aims and ideals of family life and the contexts that may influence them to help us arrive at our own understanding of family life and the aims and ideals that they aspire to hold.

*************************************************************

Registration Information:
If you are already admitted as a degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking student at the University of Minnesota, you can register by going to: http://www.onestop.umn.edu/onestop/registration.html

Non-University students are also welcome and are encouraged to enroll for some of these courses. Please complete the enrollment packet* (2 forms) found at: http://cehd.umn.edu/students/Forms/NonDegreeApp.pdf

*You will need Adobe Acrobat or Acrobat Reader to open these PDF documents. You can download a free copy of Acrobat Reader from: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html
__________________________________________________________
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

For more information, contact the course instructor or Heather Cline at fyc@umn.edu. This information subject to change without notice. For updated information, please check http://www.onestop.umn.edu

Please feel free to share this information with individuals you think may be interested. If you need any assistance or additional information, please contact me.

Thanks!
Heather

************************************
Heather Cline
Parent and Family Education
Licensure Coordinator

Family, Youth, and Community
Curriculum and Instruction
245 Peik Hall
159 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

(612) 624-1294 phone
fyc@umn.edu e-mail
***************************************************************************************************************************************

EDPA 5734 Institutional Research in Postsecondary Education
92512 -001 LEC; 04:40 P.M. - 07:20 P.M. , Thursdays (01/20/2009 - 05/08/2009); Nicholson Hall #110; Leonard S. Goldfine, gold154@umn.edu; 2-3 credits

Don't miss this opportunity to gain both theoretical as well as practical experience in the field of Institutional Research.

Institutional Researchers have a variety of job titles depending on where they work: planning offices, assessment, budget, student services, academic affairs, accreditation, and also faculty.

Whether you plan to work directly in an office of Institutional Research or work in the policy arena making use of institutional research products, or even just plan on conducting research on the people and products associated with a college or university, this class will provide you with a base understanding of this rapidly growing field. In addition to readings, classes will include guest speakers - those who work in the field and those who rely on institutional researchers to do their job - and practical exercises in building and maintaining an Office of Institutional Research and/or an Institutional Research agenda. Topics covered include issues in student research such as graduation/retention and other definitions of success; faculty and staff research such as salary equity and tenure; facility research; and much more.

**************************************************************************************************************************************
Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute 2009 - Social Justice in the Era of Accountability
Dates: February 25-27
Location: Holiday Inn Select & Suites, Bloomington, MN http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/sl/1/en/hotel/mspia (near Mall of America and Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport)

University of Minnesota students may receive up to two credits toward evaluation colloquium requirements for the MA and Ph.D. degrees:

Requirements for 1-Credit Option:
• Register for the 1-credit course via OneStop by electing EDPA 5524/EPSY 5246 Evaluation Colloquium section #79766
• Wednesday, February 25 through Friday, February 27.
• S/N Only. Paper required. Instructor: Karen E. Stout.
• Register for the conference by paying the student registration rate of $135.00 (see http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPA/MESI or contact Ann Mavis at mavis001@umn.edu or 612-624-1489).

Requirements for 2-Credit Option:
• Register for the 1-credit course via OneStop by electing EDPA 5524/EPSY 5246 Evaluation Colloquium section #79766. Wednesday, February 25 through Friday, February 27. S/N Only. Paper required. Instructor: Karen E. Stout.
• Register for the 1-credit reflection section via OneStop by electing EDPA 5080 Special Topics: MESI (section 031). #79768
• Class dates: February 20 and March 13, from 4-6 PM. Nicholson Hall 335
• S/N Only. Instructor: Karen E. Stout

• Register for the conference by paying the student registration rate of $135.00 (see http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPA/MESI or contact Ann Mavis at mavis001@umn.edu or 612-624-1489).

Contact Sara Beverage (bever005@umn.edu or 4-7574) to register after January 27, 2009.

OPTIONAL: Pre-Institute Workshops
Monday and Tuesday, February 23 and 24, 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. Cost: $285.00
• Session 1: Introduction to the Field of Program Evaluation; Stacey Stockdill, EnSearch
• Session 2: Focus Group Methods; Richard Krueger, U of MN
Attendance at pre-institute workshops is optional and students do not receive academic credit unless special arrangements have been made with the instructor.

Sponsored by:
• Department of Educational Policy and Administration
• The Evaluation Group, Institute on Community Integration
• Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement
• Minnesota Evaluation Association
Please pass this information along to other students who may be interested in attending. We look forward to seeing you at MESI 2009!

****************************************************************************************************************************************

CI5906 Program Planning in Family Education (3 cr.)
Thursday 4:40-7:20 pm. * Peik Hall, Room 46; open to upper level undergraduates and MA, MEd and PhD students
Instructor: Susan Walker, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum & Instruction (skwalker@umn.edu)

Course description: Professionals in any field who work with families can benefit from understanding approaches to the development, implementation and evaluation of educational programs that help meet learner needs, capitalize on strengths, and program goals. This course provides students with two essential perspectives in educational program planning for family issues - improvement (e.g., objectives-based, outcome driven) and attunement/critical inquiry (e.g., empowerment). Through reading, critical analysis, discussion and in class application, the class will collaboratively explore the perspectives as they best fit with audience needs. Skill building includes program planning in each perspective through the development of independent projects. This semester will explore the use of online technology in the delivery of family education programs from both perspectives, including the idea of social networking as a platform for informal learning.

Posted by lind0449 at 1:37 PM

November 14, 2008

Classes

Spring 2009 - Prevention Science - Child Psychology (CPsy) 8360
Thursdays 1:00-3:30pm, Rapson Hall, Room 13; 3 credits
Instructors: Arthur Reynolds (Child Development), Darin Erickson (Public Health), and Jayne Fulkerson (Nursing)

This course provides an in-depth examination of the prevention science field including theoretical underpinnings, state of research and practice, program development, methodology and data analysis, effects and economic benefits, policy contexts, and dissemination and use. Topics are examined from life course perspectives that include ecological and human capital theories of behavior. Intervention research and programs will be highlighted in the following areas: school failure and learning problems, substance and tobacco use, obesity, and delinquency as well as the promotion of health, mental health, and well-being. The coverage of topics is multidisciplinary which will attract students with interests in education, public health, policy analysis, nursing, child development, psychology, social work, program evaluation, and methodology.

This course is required for the planned graduate minor in Prevention Science. Eleven academic units from the following 6 schools and colleges are represented: Education and Human Development, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Public Health, Nursing, Medicine, and Liberal Arts.

The course is designed for doctoral and advanced master’s students. Students should have one year of research methods and a year of statistics background. The course will be limited to 15 students. Contact Professors Erickson (erickson_d@epi.umn.edu), Fulkerson (fulke001@umn.edu), and Reynolds (ajr@umn.edu) for further information.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:56 AM

November 7, 2008

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing - National Resilience Resource Center - University of Minnesota
CSpH 5201 - Spring 2009

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

2009 Dates:
Meets 4:30-8:00 p.m.(Wednesdays 1/21, 2/4, 2/25, 3/25, 4/29) and two Saturdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (1/24 and 2/28)) for a total of seven sessions. Twin Cities campus, Nolte Center, Room 125

*************************************************************************************************************************************

COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT

Psy 8502: Assessment * Spring Semester 2009 * 3 Credits

Wednesdays 3:30-5:00 p.m. (Lecture); Fridays 9:00-10:30 a.m. (Lab)
N595 Elliott Hall; Instructor: Laura Pendergrass, Ph.D., L.P.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basics of psychological assessment. The course will introduce students to the development and applications of specific instruments commonly used in counseling settings. Both clinical and vocational assessments will be discussed. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play activities, and in-class demonstration of assessment and test interpretation techniques. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop their own assessment and test interpretation skills through applied practice in the laboratory component of the class, which includes working with research participants who will play the role of "clients." The class will encourage students to use psychological testing to develop a deeper understanding of clients, including the cultural contexts in which people live, as part of stronger case conceptualization and treatment planning.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

**************************************************************************************************************************************

*EDPA 5734 Institutional Research in Postsecondary Education*
92512 -001 LEC; 04:40 P.M. - 07:20 P.M. , Thursdays (01/20/2009 - 05/08/2009); Nicholson Hall #110
Leonard S. Goldfine, gold154@umn.edu; 2-3 credits

Don't miss this opportunity to gain both theoretical as well as practical experience in the field of Institutional Research. Institutional Researchers have a variety of job titles depending on where they work: planning offices, assessment, budget, student services, academic affairs, accreditation, and also faculty.

Whether you plan to work directly in an office of Institutional Research or work in the policy arena making use of institutional research products, or even just plan on conducting research on the people and products associated with a college or university, this class will provide you with a base understanding of this rapidly growing field. In addition to readings, classes will include guest speakers - those who work in the field and those who rely on institutional researchers to do their job - and practical exercises in building and maintaining an Office of Institutional Research and/or an Institutional Research agenda. Topics covered include issues in student research such as graduation/retention and other definitions of success; faculty and staff research such as salary equity and tenure; facility research; and much more.
--
Leonard S. Goldfine, Ph.D.
Assistant Director
Office of Institutional Research
University of Minnesota
272-5 McNamara Center
200 Oak St. SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612-625-1481
gold154@umn.edu

*************************************************************************************************************************************

Cooperative Learning in the Classroom and School
- (EPSY 5151)

is again being offered on the first five Saturdays of Spring Semester (Jan 24, 31, Feb 7,14,21). The class focuses on how to structure cooperative relationships among students to increase the achievement, academic self-esteem and positive attitudes of students. Specific strategies for structuring the cooperation in the groups and teaching leadership, trust building and communication skills will be highlighted as well as the research and theory connected with Social Interdependence. It will be one of the last times this class will be taught by both Roger and David Johnson.

Anyone interested who has questions can contact Roger Johnson at johns009@umn.edu.

Roger Johnson
60 Peik Hall
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455
johns009@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:52 AM

September 26, 2008

Classes

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED)
College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota

Registration is still available for these online courses offered by CEED and beginning in October:

Addressing the Needs of Young Children Who Engage in Challenging Behavior
October 6 to December 8, 2008
Please register soon
Earn a Continuing Education Certificate (24 clock hours)
This online course provides students with an introduction to information needed to evaluate behavior change programs that are helpful with young children who produce challenging behavior. The primary focus of the course will be functional behavioral assessment procedures and a range of positive behavioral support strategies.
Age range: The course materials are best suited to those working with children in the age range of two to seven years old. There is some material suited to younger kids. All the material can also be considered for older kids and lower elementary age.
Instructor Emily Monn is a Graduate Research Assistant for CEED. She is currently working on the grant Preventing Challenging Behavior in Rural Early Education Settings. Her current research interests are addressing challenging behavior in young children and children with emotional behavior disorders. Emily received her M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis from St. Cloud State University in 2005. In 2005, Emily also earned certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in Educational Psychology, Special Education track, at the University of Minnesota.
Cost
$225 course registration fee, includes CD-ROM
Textbook: $23.25
To Register:
Visit the Addressing Needs description page for more information about the course, instructor, and to print a registration form.

Bridging Education and Mental Health
October 13 to December 15, 2008
Please register soon
Earn a Continuing Education Certificate (24 clock hours)
The goal of this course is to find common ground between behavioral and therapeutic approaches to supporting children who engage in challenging behavior. The course material expands on both the functional behavioral assessment and relationship-based teaching to explore what causes and sustains maladaptive behavioral patterns in children's actions and interactions and how early childhood professionals can support the healthy social and emotional development of children. A continuum of intervention strategies are offered to address the needs of children with varying needs: typically developing children, children with disabilities, and children with and without disabilities who have experienced trauma, neglect, and other environmental and relationships issues.
Instructor Leah Hjelseth's current training, research, and teaching interests center around addressing challenging behavior in early childhood and early childhood social-emotional development. Ms. Hjelseth teaches two online courses for CEED, Bridging Education and Mental Health and Addressing the Needs of Young Children with Challenging Behavior. Leah received her M.A. in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2002. Leah is a doctoral candidate in Educational Psychology with a thesis examining the effects of intensive coaching on teacher behavior aimed at decreasing challenging behavior in children and facilitating social-emotional development.
Cost
$225 course registration fee, textbook $30.00
To Register:
Visit the Bridging Education and Mental Health description page for more information about the course, instructor, and to print a registration form.

Unfamiliar with Distance Education?
Read about how we conduct our online courses.
Questions?
Contact Karen Anderson at 612-625-6617 or ander352@umn.edu.
Please Forward
If you know of organizations or individuals who would be interested in these learning opportunities, please help us get the word out by forwarding this announcement. Thank you.

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED), College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, 56 East River Road, 40 Education Sciences Building, Minneapolis, MN, 55455; phone: 612-625-3058; fax: 612-625-2093; http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:32 PM

September 17, 2008

Classes

Are you looking for a one-credit class to take outside of the department? It is late in the semester to register, but on the chance you are still interested and willing to do the necessary extra work to get registered at this point, here is a listing of all Fall 2008 1 credit courses (outside of Educational Psychology) that involve children, adolescents, or families: Download file

Posted by lind0449 at 3:19 PM

August 22, 2008

Classes

CEED Fall 2008 Online Courses - Registrations Invited
http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed/profdev/onlinecourses/2008OnlineCoursesFlyer.pdf

Seeing is Believing: Videotaping families and using guided self-observation to build on parenting strengths
Instructor: Jill Simon, MS, LICSW, Therapist, Lifetrack Resources, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 8 to December 15, 2008, Please register by September 1

Relationship-based Teaching With Young Children
Instructor: Julie Nelson, Families Together Program, Lifetrack Resources, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 15 to November 10, 2008, Please register by September 8

Parent-Infant Pathways
An Educator's Guide to Providing Information and Support to New Parents
Instructor: Jolene Pearson, MS, Minneapolis Public Schools, (Certificate: 36 clock hours), September 22 to November 24, 2008, Please register by September 15

Introduction to Infant Mental Health
Instructor: Marit Appeldoorn, LICSW; St. David's Child Development and Family Services, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 29 to December 1, 2008, Please register by September 22

Addressing Needs of Young Children Who Engage in Challenging Behavior
Instructor: Emily Monn, Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), October 6 to December 8, 2008, Please register by September 29

Bridging Education and Mental Health
Instructor: Leah Hjelseth, MA, Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), October 13 to December 15, 2008, Please register by October 6

Questions?
Contact Karen Anderson at 612-625-6617 or ander352@umn.edu.
Center for Early Education and Development, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, 40 Education Sciences Building, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455; phone: 612-625-3058; fax: 612-625-2093; website: http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:54 AM

August 8, 2008

Classes

EPSY 8400: Special Topics: Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM (3 credits)

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on the promotion of mental health and the prevention of psychological distress across the life-cycle. Major theories of prevention research and applications will be discussed including positive psychology, social justice/advocacy, reasoned action, health beliefs, and youth development. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. The seminar will also include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, prevention within multicultural and international contexts, and prevention and public policy. Students will be asked to tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
College of Education and Human Development
Questions: Contact John. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:47 AM

July 18, 2008

Classes

The Counseling Psychology Program still has space available in two of our courses for Fall 2008. The courses are Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History and Theories and Psy 8503: Interviewing and Intervention. If you are interested in either course please contact Amy Kranz (kranz007@umn.edu).

Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History and Theories
Fall Semester, 2008

3 Credits
Call # 16208
Mon. Weds. Fri. 1:00-2:30 p.m.
N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Patricia Frazier, Ph.D.

The primary purpose of this course is to review the primary theoretical orientations used by practicing psychologists (e.g., cognitive, psychodynamic). Emphasis is placed on the (1) basic principles of each theory, (2) the application of each theory to practice, (3) the empirical support for each theory, and (4) multicultural considerations.

In addition to seminar discussions, presentations, and application exercises, we will have guest speakers talk about each theory and watch videotapes of counseling sessions by practitioners of the various theories.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Psy 8503: Interviewing & Intervention
Fall Semester, 2008

3 Credit
Call # 25714
Tuesdays 1:30-3:00 p.m. (Lecture)
Thursdays 1:00-2:30 p.m. (Lab)
N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: TBA

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and practice in fundamental counseling skills necessary to competently conduct basic assessments, interviews, and interventions with potential clients. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play exercises, and in-class demonstration of interviewing and assessment techniques. In addition, the course includes an interviewing laboratory, where students will have the opportunity to conduct counseling interviews and basic assessments with research participants who will play the role of "clients." Infused throughout the course is an emphasis on empirically supported treatments and components of therapy, working within a scientist-practitioner framework, ethical considerations, and the cultural contexts in which people seek and receive help.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:24 AM

July 11, 2008

Classes

Please let your students know about two special courses that I will be teaching this fall: Introduction to Dance Movement and Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis

Please help me spread the word about these courses. If you have any questions or know anyone who might be interested in it, please feel free to contact me at 612-925-5277 or loebx001@umn.edu. If you have questions about registering please contact the U of M Dance Department at 612-624-5060.
Thank you.

Introduction to Dance Movement (Dance 3334/5334)
This course is offered through the Dance Department. Dance/Movement Therapy is a creative and expressive arts psychotherapy. It is of interest for any students interested in the uses of body, movement, psychology or creative expression and psychotherapy and healing. Please help spread the word to any interested students you know. This course also fulfills a requirement for the graduate level Dance Movement Therapy certification. It can be taken at either the graduate or undergraduate level.

Introduction to Dance/Movement Therapy
Dance 3334/5334 -U of M Dance Department/Fall 2008 Wednesdays 2:05-3:35 - 2 Credits

Course Description: This course is a basic introduction to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. It will include 1) historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement and dance in relationship to psychology and healing; 2) an introduction to some of the major Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and techniques; and 3) a brief introduction to ways that Dance/Movement Therapy is used with various populations and in a variety of settings. The class is both experiential and didactic.

Objectives: The student will be able to: . Describe the field of Dance/Movement Therapy in relationship to related disciplines such as Dance and Psychology. . Identify and discuss the basic premises, theory and approaches of Dance/Movement Therapy. . Be familiar with selected Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and their contribution to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. . Understand the uses of Dance/Movement Therapy within a variety of settings and populations. . Be familiar with training process and requirements for Dance Movement Therapy certification. Apply selected Dance/Movement Therapy techniques and approaches to their own experience.

The class will be both experiential and academic and does not require any previous movement experience. The course is appropriate for those interested in Psychology, Education, Music Therapy, Social Work and Movement Studies. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277. Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis (Dance 3333/5333) This course can also be taken as an upper level course. Please contact me for more details. I would also be happy to answer any questions you or your students might have, or to meet with you (at your convenience) to tell you more about this class. (3500 Directed Study for ICP students.)

Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis
DNCE 3333/5333 2 credits
Wed. afternoons- 12:20-1:50 pm

Audience: Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is a comprehensive language for analyzing movement, and is an important tool for any field that is involved with the study and understanding of movement and non-verbal behavior, including psychology/therapy, education, non-verbal communication, kinesiology and performance. It is relevant to students interested in Dance, Theater, Performance Arts, Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology.

The study of LMA paradigm develops an ability to observe and work with all forms of movement. It can be used to observe and work with the psychological, social and cultural aspects of movement patterns, and leads to a more articulate understanding of the communicative and expressive aspects of movement.

This course will introduce participants to all aspects of the LMA system, through movement exercises, live and video observation, verbal movement analyses, and, most importantly, the actual moving experience of the theory.


INSTRUCTOR BIO Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA CMA ADTR received an MFA in Dance from Temple University (Philadelphia), is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/ psychotherapist and has worked in area hospitals as well as in private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Women's Studies and Theater departments and has also been an Artist-in-Residence and has taught at other colleges and universities including St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:31 AM

May 16, 2008

Classes

Summer Session 1 credit Social Work class - Register now!

INTRODUCTION TO VITAL INVOLVEMENT PRACTICE (VIP)

Professor Helen Kivnick, Social Work: SW 5810, 1 credit

June 20 & June 27, 2008 • 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM • 39 Peters Hall

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Vital involvement practice (VIP) is an emerging strategy for promoting client strengths and assets, while ameliorating problems and treating disorders. The approach is useful with clients of all ages, explicitly focusing both clinician and client on identifying multifaceted client strengths, and on creatively using these strengths to achieve specific client goals.

VIP represents an application or “translation?, in practice, of Erik H. Erikson's bio-psycho-social theory of life-cycle development. As described by Erikson near the end of his life, psychosocial health rests on an individual’s vital involvement with such elements of the environment as people, activities, materials, ideas, relationships, institutions, animals, and more. Vital involvement is the basis for developing individual strengths and for exercising these strengths in the process of living robustly through the life cycle. Underlying VIP, therefore, is the conviction that along with treating client problems and pathologies, practitioners (social service, mental health, and health care providers) must also attend to individuals’ strengths, assets, and abilities to make contributions to the social environment. This construct of vital involvement was developed in a five-year collaboration by Erik Erikson, Joan Erikson, and Helen Kivnick, and was explicitly introduced in their book Vital Involvement in Old Age (1986).

VIP rests on two specific clinical skills – both mediated by newly developed data gathering tools. The first skill is that of promoting vital involvement (PVI). The second skill is the ability to utilize PVI in a 5-step process that, broadly, works to identify client life strengths and then utilize these strengths both to overcome immediate obstacles, and also achieve client goals.

Students will be introduced to VIP, its theoretical foundations (in social work, psychology, and occupational science), and its clinical components. After developing initial facility with PVI, in class, students will work through the complete 5-step process with the professor’s guidance – also in class. Each student will also work through the steps, out of class, with a “friendly volunteer.? Sample protocols and case material from pilot research will be discussed in class, along with the thinking that underlies each protocol.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Students will understand the principles and theoretical foundations of VIP, and with how to utilize these principles to help empower clients in living their everyday lives.
Students will be familiar with the skill of PVI and with the sequential steps of the VIP approach.
Students will have completed two PVI worksheets and two VIP assessment-and-life-planning workbooks.
Students will know enough about elements of the VIP approach to know how it can be incorporated into their own practice, and to identify needs for further instruction

Posted by lind0449 at 10:16 AM

May 9, 2008

Classes

The Counseling Psychology Program has space available in two of our most popular courses. Both course are offered in the Fall of 2008. If you are interested in registering for either course or would like additional information, please contact Amy Kranz (kranz007@umn.edu; 612-625-3873).

*COURSE ANNOUNCEMENTS*

Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History & Theories (call #: 16208) Offered - Mon, Wed, & Fri 1-2:30pm in N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Dr. Patricia Frazier
Course Description: The primary purposed of this course is to review the primary theoretical orientations used by practicing psychologists (e.g., cognitive, psychodynamic). Emphasis is placed on the (1) basic principles of each theory, (2) the application of each theory to practice, (3) the empirical support for each theory, and (4) multicultural considerations. In addition to seminar discussions, presentations, and application exercises, we will have guest speakers talk about each theory and watch videotapes of counseling sessions by practitioners of the various theories.

Psy 8503: Interviewing & Interventions (call # 25714) Offered - Tuesdays 1:30-3:00pm (lecture) and Thursdays 1:00-2:30pm (lab) in N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: TBA
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and practice in fundamental counseling skills necessary to competently conduct basic assessments, interviews, and interventions with potential clients. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play exercises, and in-class demonstration of interviewing and assessment techniques. In addition, the course includes an interviewing laboratory, where students will have the opportunity to conduct counseling interviews and basic assessments with research participants who will play the role of "clients." Infused throughout the course is an emphasis on empirically supported treatments and components of therapy, working within a scientist-practitioner framework, ethical considerations, and the cultural contexts in which people seek and receive help.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:59 PM

May 2, 2008

Classes

New Educational Psychology Course—Fall 2008
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program

EPSY 8400-001:
Theory and Application of Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle
(3 credits)

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on issues related to the promotion of mental health and well-being across the lifecycle. Readings and discussions will address theories, research, and applications of prevention as an important area of scholarship across multiple disciplines. Major theoretical models that anchor prevention research and applications, e. g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Health Beliefs Model, Social Justice/Advocacy, and Positive Psychology, will be discussed. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in various settings such as schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. In addition, the seminar will include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, and prevention within multicultural and international contexts. Students will tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.
Enrollment Limited

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
http://cehd.umn.edu/EdPsych/Faculty/Romano.html
(For samples of recent publications)

Questions: Contact Dr. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 11:25 AM

April 25, 2008

Classes

New Educational Psychology Course—Fall 2008
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program

EPSY 8400: Theory and Application of Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle (3 credits)

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on issues related to the promotion of mental health and well-being across the lifecyle. Readings and discussions will address theories, research, and applications of prevention as an important area of scholarship across multiple disciplines. Major theoretical models that anchor prevention research and applications, e. g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Health Beliefs Model, Social Justice/Advocacy, and Positive Psychology, will be discussed. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in various settings such as schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. In addition, the seminar will include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, and prevention within multicultural and international contexts. Students will tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.
Enrollment Limited

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
http://cehd.umn.edu/EdPsych/Faculty/Romano.html
(For samples of recent publications)

Questions: Contact Dr. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:27 AM

January 18, 2008

Classes

Dear CSPP students: Anna Mraz, a CSPP grad, was just hired by CSPP to strengthen the CSPP student personnel/higher education track in response to feedback given by students interested/exploring this area. We are very pleased to welcome Anna! Based on your input and the input of your student reps this past fall semester, we approached the Educational Psychology department and chair and are grateful that they allowed us to search and create this position on such short notice and, hence, a new pilot course has been created so suddenly. This spring semester, Anna will be supervising student personnel/higher education practicum students in addition to teaching the course listed below. Anna brings a wealth of experience in college student development, understands the needs of CSPP students, and has created an exciting contemporary course filled with seasoned college student development guest speakers. Because CSPP and the dept of Educational Psychology are trying to gauge the interest and viability of future courses like this, I urge you to seriously consider registering for this course to represent student interest in this area so that we can justify enhancing this area of CSPP in the future. Thank you for your consideration. Michael Goh.

Interested in college student development and careers in student personnel?

Register for EPsy 5400 (reg#92419)!

EPsy 5400: Current Issues in College Student Development
Registration # 92419
3 credits – Spring 2008
Tuesdays, 4:40 – 7:20pm
226 Appleby Hall

Instructor:
Anna Mraz, M.A.
Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology
143 Education Sciences Building - 56 East River Road
(612)626-7907
mrazx002@umn.edu

This course will aim to address issues that current student affairs professionals may encounter on the job and will introduce future student affairs professionals to issues in the profession. Students will also have the opportunity to practice and refine their counseling and interviewing skills through case scenarios and role plays.

Objectives for this course will include:

1. Students will gain an increased understanding of the current issues in college student development.
2. Students will practice and discuss counseling and interviewing techniques relevant for working with students facing various issues during their development in college.
3. Students will learn how and where to access information in order to stay informed about current issues in the profession.

Guest speakers, lectures, class projects, relevant readings and discussion will be used. Topics to be covered may include (this list is subject to change):

• College Student Development as a profession • Effective interventions for academically underprepared or at-risk students • Crisis Intervention for Student Affairs Professionals • Effects of parent involvement on college student development • Working with Non-Traditional Students: Issues for Student Affairs Professionals • Unique concerns affecting the development of international and multicultural students • And more!

For questions about this course, contact the instructor at mrazx002@umn.edu or 612/626-7907.

Posted by lind0449 at 4:10 PM

January 11, 2008

Classes

Improve your Spanish skills to build stronger relationships with Spanish-speaking clients!

Spring 2008 Medical Spanish Course

The College of Continuing Education will be offering a non-credit Medical Spanish course this spring to meet the growing need for bilingual health professionals. This course will help the medical community improve health care services for Spanish-speaking patients.

Spring 2008 - Span 0344: Advanced Medical Spanish
Tuesday evenings, 6:30pm to 8:30 pm; January 29, 2008 to April 1, 2008
Room 326 Folwell Hall

Prerequisites
Span 0144; two years of college level Spanish or equivalent; department consent.

Course Description
An advanced course designed to help health care professionals communicate with patients who speak Spanish. It will further develop and strengthen the language skills and cultural awareness you already have.

You will:
• Explore more advanced and specific medical vocabulary and phrases to improve your skills in conducting patient interview and physical exams, recording medical history, and understanding the Latin American view of health and health care; and
• Perform individual work on WebCT and CD-ROM. These activities focus on vocabulary, listening, reading, writing, and exploring cultural issues about interviews to a significant number of health care providers who work with the Spanish-speaking community. This is a unique opportunity to get perspectives on health related issues from Chicano/Latino immigrants in the Twin Cities.

This is a zero-credit course with a grade basis of S/N. Academic credit will not be granted.

Instructor
María Emilce López has an M.A. in both ESL and Hispanic Linguistics and teaches in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies. A native of Jujuy, Argentina, she studied and worked as a teacher there. María Emilce develops materials for teaching Spanish for specific purposes as well as creating technology-enhanced learning experiences.

For more information on Span 0344 visit www.cce.umn.edu/creditcourses/courses/medspan/

To register contact the College of Continuing Education at 612-624-4000 or info@cce.umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:14 PM

July 27, 2007

Classes

Announcement from Thom Swiss regarding a fall course offering in Department of Curriculum and Instruction:

NEW FALL COURSE COUNTS AS EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS COURSE (CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS)

CULTURAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION
(CI 8150: Research Topics Curr & Instruction)

Instructor: Professor Thom Swiss (swiss@umn.edu)) Mondays, 4:40-7:20; Peik Hall 27

Cultural Studies in Education is an interdisciplinary course that brings perspectives from the humanities and social sciences to bear on the study of teaching and learning. Cultural Studies recognizes that educational systems are situated in the contexts of culture, knowledge, and power and that these contexts have created systems of inequity. The course, then, is meant to advance a critical understanding of education though the study of culture and to encourage students to investigate the relationship between schooling, education, culture, and society. In short, students will learn to "do" cultural studies in education.

Readings include (with additional PDFs and Websites):

John Storey, Cultural Theory & Culture: An Introduction, 4th edition
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007). [INTRO]

John Storey, Cultural Theory & Culture: A Reader, 3rd edition
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007). [READER]

Henry Jenkins, Textual Poachers

Course requirements fall into three categories: workshops/ discussion, online posts and brief essays, and projects.

Posted by lind0449 at 8:59 AM

July 13, 2007

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Spring 2008

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

2008 Dates:
Meets 4:30-8:00 p.m.(Tuesday 1/22, and Thursdays 1/24, 2/7, 3/27, 4/10, 5/1)
and one Saturday (1/26) from 9a.m. to 5 p.m. for a total of seven sessions.

Posted by lind0449 at 4:18 PM

June 15, 2007

Classes

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED)

CEED Trainings
Does your organization have some extra time for training this summer? Do you have some money to use on training before the end of the fiscal year? CEED can help. We offer trainings on a variety of early education and development topics, including:
· Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health
· Addressing the Needs of Young Children with Challenging Behaviors
· Steps Towards Effective and Enjoyable Parenting (STEEP) and Seeing is Believing (SIB)
· Individual Growth and Development Indicators

For a full list of training topics and more information on how your organization can purchase a CEED training, please visit http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/default.html.

And don’t forget…STEEP™
Steps Toward Effective, Enjoyable Parenting
Relationship-based Strategies for Working with Infants and Families in High-Risk Circumstances

STEEP™ works on the premise that a secure attachment between parent and infant establishes ongoing patterns of healthy interaction. A secure parent-child attachment lays the foundation for later competence and well-being. Through home visits and group sessions, STEEP™ facilitators work alongside parents to help them understand their child’s development. Parents learn to respond sensitively and predictably to their child’s needs, and to make decisions that ensure a safe and supportive environment for the whole family.

Location: 151 Folwell Hall, UMN East Bank
Week-long June session: June 18-22, 2007, 9am-4pm each day
Registration deadline: June 11, 2007 OR until full

Cost: $400 includes registration as well as the manuals and DVD required for the course.

To Register
Print the registration form at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/courses/STEEPRegistrationForm.doc
For more information about this training, visit http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/courses/junesteep.htm

Questions?

Contact Sara Zettervall at 612-625-2252 or sarazet@umn.edu.

Read about more CEED events and activities by visiting the CEED web site at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:27 AM

June 1, 2007

Classes

Summer 2007 - Now Enrolling! - EdPA 5048
CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON LEADERSHIP
June 25-29, 2007

This intensive class will introduce participants to the concepts of leadership and culture that influence the functioning of cross-cultural groups and major institutions today. In this workshop, we seek to clarify these concepts and consider how they can be applied to real world situations. The classroom is often such a cross-cultural environment and the teacher has an important leadership role in it. But the scope of the course goes beyond to any situation requiring an international or intercultural leadership. This class will employ a variety of instructional approaches including lectures, critical incidents, case studies, large-group and small-group discussions, a simulation, and problem solving exercises.

This course is designed for students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of leadership and culture. To achieve this goal, the course will use concepts drawn from several academic disciplines and cultural contexts. Students will be expected to integrate these concepts and learn how to translate them from theory to practice. This workshop is not a traditional leadership training program, but an academic course designed to produce understanding of complex social relations phenomena; in this way, it has a meta-learning objective about how to gain knowledge of leadership, institutions and culture.

INSTRUCTORS

Dr. Josef A. Mestenhauser is Distinguished International Emeritus Professor in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration. In his fifty-year career he has published more than 120 books, monographs, articles and book chapters on international education, educational exchanges, international studies, transfer of knowledge, cross-cultural relations, leadership development, cultural change, educational reform and professionalism. He is three-time holder of senior Fulbright grants in the Philippines, Japan and Czechoslovakia.

Dr. Mestenhauser has been President of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, ISECSI (International Society for Educational, Cultural and Scientific Interchanges) and the Fulbright Association of Minnesota, and has held offices in several professional associations.

Dr. Brenda J. Ellingboe has 17 years of experience teaching English, intercultural communication, intercultural leadership, and international education. Since 2000, she has been designing and delivering non-credit continuing education courses for adult learners in 25 companies. She has also taught credit-based intercultural communication courses for two companies, two community colleges, three universities, and three liberal arts colleges. She is the owner of Be Globally Focused, a consulting service that promotes intercultural competence at the individual and organizational levels. She has taught intercultural leadership courses for Century College since 2002 and initiated their new Intercultural Leadership Certificate program, the first in the Midwest.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:47 AM

May 25, 2007

Classes

CI 8150: Research Topics Curriculum and Instruction
Action Research in Teaching and Teacher Education
3 credits - Summer 2007 - July 9 – 20, 2007 - 9:00 – 12:30

[reading list will be available in June]
Visiting Scholar Ken Zeichner, University of Wisconsin, Madison
&
Misty Sato, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Course Description
In this course, we will explore various aspects of a movement in education and educational research in which educational practitioners (e.g., P-12 teachers, school administrators, professors, etc.) are viewed as researchers of their own practice and in which teaching is viewed as a form of educational inquiry. The course will provide you with a broad overview of some of the epistemological, political, and methodological issues associated with the idea of practitioner research. Throughout the course, we will be reading work by both practitioner researchers and academics about the process of practitioner research and about the specific questions and issues that have been investigated through practitioner research. The term practitioner research in this course will be used as a generic descriptor that describes all of its different varieties (e.g., action research, teacher research, self-study research, etc.).

About Ken Zeichner
Ken Zeichner is Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Teacher Education and Associate Dean, University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition to his responsibility for the teacher education programs at his university as Associate Dean, he coordinates a Professional Development School Partnership involving 5 schools in the Madison school district.

He was Vice President of Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) of the American Educational Research Association from 1996-98, a member of the Board of Directions of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education from 1997-2000, and is currently a member of the Board of the National Society for the Study of Education.

He was previously affiliated as a principal investigator with the National Centers for Research on Teacher Education and Teacher Learning at Michigan State University (1985-1995), the National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching, and is currently involved in the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching study of Teacher Education and was co-chair of the AERA Consensus Panel on Teacher Education.

His publications include Teacher education and the social conditions of schooling (1991) with Dan Liston, Issues and Practices in Inquiry Oriented Teacher Education (1991) with Bob Tabachnick, Reflective Teaching and Culture and Teaching (1996) with Dan Liston, Currents of Reform in Preservice Teacher Education (1996) with Susan Melnick and Mary Gomez, Democratic Teacher Education Reform in Africa: The Case of Namibia (1999) with Lars Dahlstrom, "Practitioner Research" with Susan Noffke in the Handbook of Research on Teaching (4th edition) (2001), and "Educational Action Research" in The Handbook of Action Research (2001).

Posted by lind0449 at 1:46 PM

May 4, 2007

Classes

Summer 2007 Disability Courses
For community professionals and University students

Offered through the Institute on Community Integration and the Department of Educational Policy and Administration, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota

Disability Policy & Services (EdPA 5356, 3 cr) June 11-22, 8a.m.-noon (M-F) This course will examine current policy, research, and practices related to services that support individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. The course will engage students with leading researchers and experts, emphasizing policy development and implementation, and collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches to services. It will especially focus on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in life domains such as education, employment, health, recreation, community living, and family supports. The course is the core course for the Certificate in Disability Policy and Services, a 12-credit interdisciplinary program studying services and supports for persons with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities.

Person-Centered Thinking & Planning for Persons with Disabilities (EdPA 5080, 3 cr, CEUs available) July 9-20, 8 a.m.-­noon (M-F) This course will draw on the expertise of University faculty and researchers, as well as individuals with disabilities, family members, and community professionals, to provide an overview of person-centered thinking and planning for persons with disabilities, with an emphasis on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. It will include a focus on the evolution of person-centered thinking, and in-depth examination of contemporary applications. Among topics discussed are self-determination, community inclusion, self-advocacy, rights/choice, person-centeredness, dignity/respect, cultural sensitivity, and collaboration.

For further information about course content, or the College's Certificate in Disability Policy and Services, contact Marijo McBride at the Institute on Community Integration, 612/624-6830 or mcbri001@umn.edu. For summer class registration information, contact the College's Office of Student and Professional Services at 612/625-6501 or spsinfo@umn.edu. Information about CEUs is available from Continuing Professional Studies at 612/625-5060 or cpstudy@umn.edu. General information is also online at www.education.umn.edu.

*****************************************************************************************************************************************

CI 8150: Culture and Teaching Colloquium: Theorizing Culture and Teaching
Primary Instructor: Bic Ngo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fall 2007; Wednesdays, 1:25-4:05pm: 3 Credits
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course Description
The Culture and Teaching doctoral track addresses teaching, learning, and curriculum in social and cultural contexts. The program affirms that education is influenced by social, cultural, political, and economic formations and structures. The study of education cannot neglect the interconnections between experiences and practices in homes and communities—at local, national, and global levels—and experiences and practices in schools and classrooms. The track also assumes that educators’ and learners’ identities and experiences profoundly impact teaching, learning, and learning to teach.

The colloquium will explore interdisciplinary perspectives on a theme central to the cultural study of teaching and learning such as urban education, social theories of knowledge, race, media and education. All four faculty (Ngo, Sato, Swiss, Lensmire) in Culture and Teaching will share in the coordination and teaching of the colloquium using a team teaching approach.

In Fall 2007, the theme for the Colloquium will be Theorizing Culture and Teaching. The purpose of this seminar is to provide an introduction to some of the theories and theorists that have been influential in thinking and theorizing about culture and teaching. The CaT faculty will lead seminar participants in the exploration of theories/theorists that have informed our thinking/researching/writing about education, youth and families. We will read primary texts of theorists such as Anzaldua, Bakhtin, Barthes, and Godamer. We will then examine educational research that has drawn on these theories.

Course Goals
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Understand some part of the rich history of theories that have informed the way we think about culture and teaching.
• Evaluate diverse approaches to thinking and writing about theories in research on culture and teaching.
• Identify relationships between the multiple facets of the theories that have influenced research on culture and teaching.
• Develop theories of/approaches to researching or teaching about theorizing culture and teaching.

For more information, contact Bic Ngo at bcngo@umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:15 AM

April 24, 2007

Classes

Announcing May Session and Summer Session Courses in Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology!

Please note two special topics courses that will be offered during the May session taught by CSPP faculty member Tom Skovolt:

EPSY 5400 Special Topics in Counseling Psychology (max credits 8; 8 repeats allowed)
EPSY 5400 -101, 09:05 A.M. - 04:25 P.M. , W,Th (06/06/2007 - 06/07/2007) , BuH 123 , TCEASTBANK , Skovholt,Thomas M (Morse Alumni Award), Resiliency Dev for Couns, Teachers & Health Prof , 1 credit

EPSY 5400 -102, 09:05 A.M. - 04:25 P.M. , W,Th (05/23/2007 - 05/24/2007) , PeikH 335 , TCEASTBANK , Skovholt,Thomas M (Morse Alumni Award), Helping Skills for Advisors , 1 credit


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Hello Fellow CSPP Students!

I am happy to announce a course called Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing to be offered this summer, June 11th - June 15th from 9:00-11:30 each day (M-F). The course description and goals are listed below. If you have any questions about the course, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,
Michelle Trotter
trot0026@umn.edu

Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing EPsy 5400-001: Special Topics - 1 credit - June 2007 9:00-11:30 a.m., June 11, 12, 13, 14 & 15

Course Description This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work, nursing and related fields. The course will use practice and scholarly research to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing. The course will have an experiential component through which students will practice the various interventions being studied. The course will also draw on the expertise of guest speakers to augment course readings, lecture, class discussions and in-class activities.

Course Goals This course is designed to give practitioners and students in the helping professions an introduction to mind-body and creative approaches to promote therapeutic growth. Through in-class activities the course will allow students to immerse themselves in the various techniques, with the ultimate goal of integrating what they learn in class to current or future therapeutic environments. Each topical area will include a review of the literature on the topic. Research findings and experiential work will be combined in an exploration of the topics.

--
Michelle Trotter, MA
Doctoral Candidate
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Educational Psychology Department trot0026@umn.edu

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New Special Topics Summer Course!
EPSY 5400-002: Crisis Intervention in Mental Health Settings
1 credit
June 16-16, 9:00-4:30

This course is designed to introduce students to the major features of client-related crises that occur in mental health settings, including community agencies and college counseling centers. It will provide students with the opportunity to learn both theory and practical skills related to crisis intervention. Experiential learning through role-playing and group exercises will supplement lecture and class discussion. Guest speakers will present on related topics.

Sample Topics:
-Assessment and intervention with suicidal and potentially violent clients
-Working with victims of sexual violence
-Vicarious traumatization and clinician self-care

Contact the instructor, Sandra Sanger, MA, LPC at engx0021@umn.edu with questions.

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Spirituality and Resilience
Center for Spirituality and Healing - National Resilience Resource Center - University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201- Summer 2007 - Location TBA

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.
• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated summer schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693.(kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available.

Dates/Location: June 11, 13, 15, 20, 21 and 25, 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; Saturday June 16, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Class will be on the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Specific room location will be announced.

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CI 8155: Immigrant Families and U.S. Schools
Fall 2007 - Instructor: Bic Ngo
Mondays, 4:40pm-7:20pm

"Today one in five children in the United States is the child of immigrants, and it is projected by 2040 one in three children will fit this description. Given the numbers involved, how these children adapt and the educational
pathways they take will have clearly profound implications for our society." -Carola Suarez-Orozco

This course will examine the educational experiences of contemporary immigrants (post-1965) in U.S. schools. We will explore the concerns and debates surrounding immigration, assimilation and acculturation to the U.S. We will then take a closer look at the research on various immigrant groups and examine the major issues that are confronted by immigrant families and youth in U.S. schools and society. In this course, we will shift from simplistic theoretical models of immigrant assimilation and highlight instead the experiences of immigrant families and youth as those that change and respond to external—structural, ideological, cultural—forces in U.S. society.

Course Objectives
• To provide students with the background necessary to understand current issues and debates about immigration to and immigrants in the United States, particularly as it pertains to education and academic achievement
• To convey the complexity of the political, social and economic contexts surrounding the experiences of immigrants in U.S. schools and society
• To illustrate the impact (and intersections) of gender, race, class, language and culture on the experiences of immigrants in U.S. schools and society
• To complicate theoretical conceptualizations of the immigrant experience in U.S. schools and society

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Center for Early Education and Development (CEED) and Institute of Child Development (ICD)
College of Education and Human Development
University of Minnesota
~~ Announcing a New Educational Opportunity ~~

Please note: This Certificate Program is under review for approval by the Regents. (See statement included on main IECMH web page for specifics on this point.) The web site will make note when this approval is official.

The Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Certificate Program

Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health is an emerging area of scholarship, research, and public service that defies contemporary disciplinary boundaries. Individuals working in many types of settings will benefit from this program of study. The certificate program will present cutting edge research and theory coupled with interdisciplinary practices applicable to all work with young children and their families.

We Invite Your Applications

You are invited to apply for admission into the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Certificate Program (IECMH), which begins its first two-year cohort in August 2007.

Intended Participants
Persons who may be candidates for this program include (but are not limited to) early childhood educators, parent educators, social workers, home visitors, doulas, midwives, Part C service coordinators, NICU nurses, public health nurses, clinical nurse practitioners, therapists, supervisors, early intervention specialists, policy specialists, physicians, faculty members, and graduate students.

Two Tracks
A hallmark of the Certificate's curriculum is the creation of two tracks:

Clinical Track:
Credentialed mental health professionals who wish to build their knowledge and skills in infant and early childhood mental health, dyadic or triadic treatment, and reflective consultation.

Community Track:
Front-line professionals who work with young children and their families (e.g., public health nurses, parent educators, child welfare workers, early interventionists, and early childhood educators) who often confront complex mental health issues for which they feel unprepared.

Two Credit Options
Additionally, students who enroll in the IECMH Certificate Program may choose to earn CEUs/clock hours or academic (professional) credits. Academic credits are offered through the Institute of Child Development with (ICD) courses designated "Child Psychology (CPsy)."

More Information and How to Apply
For comprehensive information about this Certificate Program and application materials, visit the IECMH Certificate Program web page at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/iecmhcp.

Questions?
Contact Patricia Kester, Program Coordinator, at 612-626-9579 or email kest0026@umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:42 AM

March 2, 2007

Classes

ATTENTION: Professionals and Graduate Students Interested in Working with Parents and Families

The University of Minnesota is offering graduate level parent education courses online for the first time.

The parent education courses are graduate level and offered in sequence beginning in June of each year. The instructors and students are immediately actively engaged together and build relationships as they complete the sequence of courses. This program prepares parent educators to work in Minnesota’s Early Childhood Family Education (ECFE) programs and other Minnesota settings and in other states and countries.

Online Parent Education COURSES
CI 5932 Introduction to Parent Education – 1 semester credit (Summer 2007)
CI 5942 Everyday Experiences of Families – 2 semester credits (Summer 2007)

For registration information go to: http://www.education.umn.edu/CI/Programs/FYC/parent-course-desc.html

CI 5943 Parent Learning & Development: Implications for Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Fall 2007)
CI 5944 Parent Education Curriculum – 2 semester credits (Fall 2007)
CI 5945 Teaching and Learning in Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)
CI 5946 Assessment & Evaluation in Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)
CI 5949 Parent Education Practicum – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)

Courses required in related areas if obtaining a minnesota teaching license
Family Development – 2 credits minimum (CI 5942 listed above meets this requirement)
Parent-Child Relationships – 3 credits minimum
Child Development – 6 credits minimum

Other Licensure Requirements for those obtaining a Minnesota teaching license
PUBH 6003 Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse – 1 semester credit (online)
EPSY 5135 Human Relations Workshop – 4 semester credits (online)

EXAM - Praxis I: PPST Exam - http://www.ets.org/praxis

If you already hold a Minnesota teaching license or you are not interested in a Minnesota teaching license, PUBH 6003, EPSY 5135, and the Praxis Exam are not required.

IN PROCESS
A Certificate in Parent Education program is in the process of being approved for those completing the online parent education courses and the courses in related areas who are not interested in obtaining the Minnesota teaching license.

For more information about the online parent education courses and Licensure Program, go to:
http://education.umn.edu/CI/Programs/FYC/parent.html or fyc@umn.edu or contact Chris Buzzetta at (612) 624-1294.

Posted by lind0449 at 2:51 PM

January 19, 2007

Classes

Please join us Spring Semester 2007

Violence Can Be Prevented!
PubH 6-123: Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application
NOTE: THIS COURSE WILL NOT BE OFFERED, AGAIN, UNTIL 2009.
2 credits
Faculty: Mary Findorff, Ph.D., M.P.H. and guest faculty
Time: Mondays, 3:35 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (1st class - January 22nd)

Background: Injuries from all sources are the leading cause of death for persons under the age of 45 years; 38% of the deaths from injury are the result of violence! Types of violence include interpersonal violence such as homicide, assaults, child abuse, intimate partner violence, elder abuse, and self-directed violence, such as suicides and suicide attempts. On an average day in America, 53 persons die from homicide, and a minimum of 18,000 persons survive interpersonal assaults, 84 persons complete suicide, and as many as 3,000 persons attempt suicide.

Costs of this violence to society are enormous. These costs include emergency department visits, inpatient hospital stays, outpatient (including treatment by physicians, chiropractors, psychologists, etc.), lost work days and workers’ compensation costs, years of potential life lost, legal costs, and other costs to the individual, including pain and suffering, disability, and decreased quality of life.

Course Description:Analyses and critique of major theories and epidemiologic research pertinent to violence, including characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors, reporting and treatment protocols, and current/potential intervention efforts and prevention initiatives; emphasis on interdisciplinary contributions to violence prevention and control. For students with interests in violence prevention and control from various disciplines including public health, nursing, law, medicine, social work, law enforcement, education, and psychology, etc., this course provides a foundation essential to the field.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course (PubH 6-123), the student will be able to:
* identify the magnitude of the problem to the degree that it is known, based on peer-reviewed literature and other resources.
* identify and discuss perspectives on the identification and characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors.
* analyze theory and research pertinent to violence.
* describe and critique procedures used in the reporting and treatment of various types of violence.
* identify potential intervention efforts and community initiatives pertinent to violence prevention and control.
* discuss the contributions of various disciplines such as nursing, public health, medicine, law enforcement, education, and social work etc. to violence prevention and control.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:57 AM

January 5, 2007

Classes

EPsy 8800: Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth
Spring Semester, Thursday, 1:25 – 4:15, 3 credits, 303 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Dr. Sandra Christenson

This seminar provides a broad overview of mental health service delivery for children and youth. The seminar is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature, emphasizing mental health service delivery rather than school-based mental health. Consequently, a primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity to educate future mental health service providers about critical issues and strategies unique to the disciplinary course of study of theirs as well as those of others. Class topics include: defining mental health, defining mental health services, clarifying who provides and receives mental health services, mental health legislation and policy (historic/landmark and recent mental health legislation, screening (Identifying at risk youth), prevention, assessment/evaluation, examining mental health interventions (e.g., non-medication interventions/treatment , psychopharmacological interventions) and others. The seminar is designed to include students from varied departments and working toward different degrees (school psychology, counseling, child clinical, family social science, public health, nursing, social work).

Class No. 68825
For more information you can call Deb Lavoie at 624-4156 or email her at lavoi003@umn.edu

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Another 1 Credit option for CSPP Students:

IS THE WORKPLACE SAFE?
PUBH 6122 Seminar: Safety in the Workplace

PLEASE JOIN US! Spring Semester, 2007
1 credit No pre-requisites -- just interested participants!
Faculty: Susan Goodwin Gerberich, Ph.D., M.S.P.H. and guest faculty
Time: Wednesdays, 12:20-2:15 pm (every other week, as follows:01/24; 02/07; 02/21; 03/07; 03/21; 04/04; 04/18; 05/02)
Location: Mayo Memorial Building - D-199

Course Description: The seminar format enables students to understand the realm of and potential risk factors for occupational safety problems, and to identify potential strategies for prevention and control.

Complete description: Download file

Posted by lind0449 at 8:57 AM

December 20, 2006

Classes

Pat McCarthy Veach would like CSPP MA Students to note that this class might be a great 1 credit option for you!

CI 5900 Special Topics in Family, Youth, and Community: Grief, Loss, and Shattered Dreams

Spring 2007
*************************************************************
1 Credit Registration #: 65157, Instructor: Ted Bowman, 315 Peik Hall, Minneapolis Campus

Course is taught over two Saturdays:
Saturday, Feb 24, 2007 9:00 am-4:30 pm
Saturday, Mar 10, 2007 9:00 am-4:30 pm

Ted Bowman has been regularly teaching for family education since 1981. For years, he also worked in family service agencies providing services directly to families and indirectly through training and consultation. He now operates an internationally recognized independent practice specializing in change, transition, grief, loss, and group leadership.

Course Description:
Families can face many challenges including grief and loss. It is important for professionals who work with families to be able to address these important issues. In this applied class, participants will explore:
- A framework for understanding and clarifying losses
- Steps which can be appropriately taken in the parent and family education settings
- Alternative steps to take when referral is warranted.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:02 AM

November 22, 2006

Classes

Spring Semester Higher Education Courses

Hello colleagues

I attach a list of the spring semester higher education offering.

Note that two are co-listed with EPSY.

Download file

DH

Darwin D. Hendel
Associate Professor
Coordinator, Higher Education Program
Department of Educational Policy and Administration
College of Education and Human Development 330 Wulling Hall
86 Pleasant Street
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone (612) 625-0129
FAX (612) 624-3377

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EPsy 8800: Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth
Spring Semester
Thursday, 1:25 – 4:15, (3 credits), 303 Elliott Hall

Instructor: Dr. Sandra Christenson

This seminar provides a broad overview of mental health service delivery for children and youth. The seminar is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature, emphasizing mental health service delivery rather than school-based mental health. Consequently, a primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity to educate future mental health service providers about critical issues and strategies unique to the disciplinary course of study of theirs as well as those of others. Class topics include: defining mental health, defining mental health services, clarifying who provides and receives mental health services, mental health legislation and policy (historic/landmark and recent mental health legislation, screening (Identifying at risk youth), prevention, assessment/evaluation, examining mental health interventions (e.g., non-medication interventions/treatment , psychopharmacological interventions) and others. The seminar is designed to include students from varied departments and working toward different degrees (school psychology, counseling, child clinical, family social science, public health, nursing, social work).

Class No. 68825
For more information you can call Deb Lavoie at 624-4156 or email her at lavoi003@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 10:27 AM

November 10, 2006

Classes

CSpH 5201: Spirituality and Resilience
Spring 2007
Center for Spirituality and Healing, National Resilience Resource Center

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:22 AM

May 19, 2006

Classes

FROM: Richard Krueger

Senior Fellow – Evaluation Studies -- EdPA

Here are some courses in evaluation, interviewing and focus group interviewing that might be of interest to your students. I will be the instructor for each of these courses. The courses are concentrated opportunities and offered during weekends or semester break. Several are offered at the Rochester University Center.

The Rochester classes (evaluation and interviewing) are offered over a series of week-ends, which make them convenient for students holding down day jobs. In addition, because of the concentrated week-end schedule, the courses have been popular even with students from outside of the Rochester area.

EdPA 5501 / EPsy 5243 -- Principles and Methods of Evaluation offered in Rochester is similar to what is taught here on campus, but concentrated over a series of week-ends.

A new course, EdPA 5080 -- Special Topics: Interviewing Individuals and Adults is a 2- credit course offered in Rochester designed for those interested in doing interviews for evaluation or research. The class seeks to help evaluators and researchers plan, organize, conduct and analyze interviews (individual and group) in a manner that is consistent with quality protocol, ethical responsiveness, and respect for the respondent(s). This course will begin with an overview of evaluation / research interviewing and identify practices and techniques used by experts. The class will cover topics such as planning the interview, setting up the logistics, developing appropriate questions, skills in asking questions, capturing the data, and analyzing results.

EdPA 5080 Special Topics -- Conducting Focus Group Interviews will be offered here in the Twin Cities. This is a 3-credit course next winter that concentrates on focus group interviewing. It will begin in January before the beginning of Spring Semester.

Here are the details:

Fall Semester 2006

EdPA 5501 & EPsy 5243: Principles and Methods of Evaluation

In Rochester, 3 credits, 3 weekends from 5 pm – 9 pm Friday and 8 am – 4pm Saturday.

EA111 - East Hall at the University Center in Rochester.

September 29 - 30, October 27 - 28, and November 10 - 11, 2006. Instructor: Richard Krueger

EdPA 5080: Special Topics: Interviewing Individuals and Groups

In Rochester, 2 credit, 2 weekends: 5 pm – 9 pm Friday & 8 am-4 pm Sat

November 17 - 18, 2006 and December 1 - 2, 2006. Instructor: Richard Krueger

Spring Semester 2007

EdPA 5080: Special Topics: Conducting Focus Group Interviews

In Twin Cities 3 credits, 8am – 4pm

January 11, 12, 13, February 24, March 31, 2007. Instructor: Richard Krueger

Posted by kenne064 at 8:37 AM

May 12, 2006

Classes

Hello Fellow CSPP Students,

I am happy to announce a new course called Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing to be offered this summer, June 5th – June 9th from 9:00-11:30 each day (M-F). This is the first time this course will be taught, so any help in spreading the word to interested students within in CSPP and other programs would be much appreciated. If you have any questions about the course, please feel free to contact me.

Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing, 1 credit

June 5 – 9, M-F, 9:00-11:30

Course Description

This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work, nursing and related fields. The course will use practice and scholarly research to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing. The course will have an experiential component through which students will practice the various interventions being studied. The course will also draw on the expertise of guest speakers to augment course readings, lecture, class discussions and in-class activities.

Sincerely,

Michelle Trotter, MA
trot0026@umn.edu

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Fall 2006 Special Topics
EPsy 8400:
Orientation to Self & Career Teaching Practicum

Tuesdays, 11:00-1:00
Instructor: Dr. Tabitha Grier

A 10 hour per week practicum, you will be trained to use the constructivist career development curriculum for PSTL 1076 Orientation to Self and Career, and you will instruct one section of this two credit course.

*Make yourself more competitive for teaching positions!*

This practicum is designed to help you extend general group and career counseling skills to the domain of teaching and learning. Constructivist career development and relational, active learning paradigms of education will be our focus.

*Integrate group and career counseling skills in the classroom!*

Sensitivity to context and socialization in a multicultural setting is a major feature of this practicum.

*Learn to apply constructivist counseling, teaching, and learning tools in a multicultural classroom!*

Contact Tabith Grier at grier001@umn.edu for more information.

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Hello,
I am writing to let you know about a course that I will be teaching Fall 2006: INTRODUCTION TO LABAN MOVEMENT ANALYSIS (DNCE 1500 section 050). This course can also be taken as an upper level course. Please contact me for more details. I would also be happy to answer any questions you or your students might have, or to meet with you (at your convenience) to tell you more about this class.

Audience: Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is a comprehensive language for analyzing movement, and is an important tool for any field that is involved with the study and understanding of movement and non-verbal behavior, including psychology/therapy, education, non-verbal communication, kinesiology and performance. It is relevant to students interested in Dance, Theater, Performance Arts, Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology.

The study of LMA paradigm develops an ability to observe and work with all forms of movement. It can be used to observe and work with the psychological, social and cultural aspects of movement patterns, and leads to a more articulate understanding of the communicative and expressive aspects of movement.

This course will introduce participants to all aspects of the LMA system, through movement exercises, live and video observation, verbal movement analyses, and, most importantly, the actual moving experience of the theory.


OFFICIAL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND INFORMATION
Course number: DNCE 1500 section 050 2 credits
Course times: Wed. afternoons- 12:20-1:50 pm
Location: TBA (probably at the Barker Center)
Course Instructor: Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb
Loebx001@umn.edu
Phone: 612-925-5277

INSTRUCTOR BIO
Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA CMA ADTR received an MFA in Dance from Temple University (Philadelphia), is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/ psychotherapist and has worked in area hospitals as well as in private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Women’s Studies and Theater departments and has also been an Artist-in-Residence and has taught at other colleges and universities including St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania..

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Merra Young, adjunct faculty at CSPH, is offering a fall semester course on Integrative Psychotherapy: Effective Use of Compassion, Emotional and Spiritual Healing which includes Mindfulness and compassion practice at it's foundation. Csph #5541

Posted by kenne064 at 8:47 AM

April 21, 2006

Classes

CSPP Special Topics Summer Courses:

MAY TERM

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

5400-101 84149 9:05-4:25 WTh 5/24/-5/25 PeikH 225 Skovholt

Helping Skills for Advisors

This course will focus on seven areas: the helping process including the cycle of caring; the helping relationship; the exploration of the student’s concerns; promoting student understanding; setting goals; taking action; ethical issues.

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

5400-102 81438 9:05-4:25 WTh 6/7-6/8 BuH 125 Skovholt

Resiliency: Development for Counselors, Teachers, and Health Professionals

Being resilient as practitioners requires us to consciously make choices that help sustain the work that we do. The resilient practitioner uses specific strategies to prevent burnout. Resiliency development is expressed with concepts like Boundaried Generosity, Self-Other Differentiation, Outcome Control, Work Reflectivity, Flow, the Process Measure of Success and Re-Creation. In addition, it is important to learn the Cycle of Caring skills of involvement again. This course focuses on the intense work demands experienced by helpers, teachers and healers, and considers practice and research-based solutions.

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

5400-103 88261 9:00-11:30 MTWThF 6/5-6/9 BuH 120 Trotter

Integrative Wellness: Mind-Body Approaches

This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work and related fields. This class will use scholarly research, experiential exercises, guest speakers and class discussion to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing.

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

SUMMER TERM

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

5400-001 87228 5:00-9:00 F 6/16 McDonald
8:00-4:30 S 6/17

Counseling Needs of Immigrants

This course will begin with a broad description of immigration patterns to the United States, will progress to exploring typical difficulties faced by immigrant groups, and will conclude with a discussion of appropriate counseling interventions. This course will assist those in the helping professions, such as counselors, social workers, and nurses, in deepening their understanding of immigrants and their concerns about living and functioning in the United States. A variety of teaching methods will be utilized, including lecture, large- and small-group discussion, individual research and reading, the internet, and an experiential component.

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

5400-002 88486 6:00-8:10 MTWTh 6/12-6/15 Sanger
6:00-8:10 MTW 6/19-6/21

Crisis Intervention in Mental Health Settings

The course is designed to introduce students to the major features of crises that occur in mental health settings, including community agencies and college counseling centers. It will provide students with the opportunity to learn both theory and practical skills related to crisis intervention. Experiential learning through role-playing and group exercises will supplement lecture and class discussion.

Posted by kenne064 at 2:35 PM

April 14, 2006

Classes

To all EAP Professionals:

St Mary's is planning for a May-June 2006 EAP class. They need at a
minimum 8 enrollees.
If you are working toward your CEAP and need credits or are due for a
recertification, this is a great opportunity.
The class cannot be scheduled until St Mary's has confidence that they
will enroll at least 8 to the class.
If you are interested in this class, please respond to, Dale
Demarest-Bryan
at dale.demarest-bryan@cignabehavioral.com. before 4/21/2006.

Best Regards.
Dale

Posted by kenne064 at 2:12 PM

December 9, 2005

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Spring 2006

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

Dates: Meets five Wednesdays 4:40-7:30 p.m.
(1/18, 2/1, 2/22, 3/22, 4/5) and two Saturdays
(1/21, 2/11) from 9a.m. to 4p.m. for a total
of seven sessions.

Posted by kenne064 at 3:01 PM

November 18, 2005

Classes

I am emailing you to let you know about two courses being offered this spring at the U of M through the Dance Department: INTRODUCTION TO DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (DNCE 3500 sec. 05) and BODY WORKS: INTRODUCTION TO SOMATIC STUDIES (DNCE 1500 sec. 50). With the growing attention to the use of alternative healing modalities in medicine and also for daily practice, these courses are of particular to anyone interested in the field of Complimentary and Alternative Therapies, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Creative Arts Therapy, Music Therapy, Social Work, Education, Dance or other healing modality. The course topics are also relevant to anyone interested in performance studies (music, dance or theater) or sports/sports medicine.

Please help me spread the word about these courses. If you have any questions or know anyone who might be interested in it, please feel free to contact me at 612-925-5277 or loebx001@umn.edu. If you have questions about registering please contact the U of M Dance Department at 612-624-5060. Thank you, Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb

****************************************************************

Introduction to Dance/Movement Therapy
Dnce 3500 - section 005, Topics in Dance; U of M Dance Department/Spring 2006
Wednesdays 2:05-3:35 - 2 Credits;To Register: contact the Registrars: 612-625-5333

Course Description:
This course is a basic introduction to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. It will include 1) historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement and dance in relationship to psychology and healing; 2) an introduction to some of the major Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and techniques; and 3) a brief introduction to ways that Dance/Movement Therapy is used with various populations and in a variety of settings. The class is both experiential and didactic.

Objectives: The student will be able to:
Describe the field of Dance/Movement Therapy in relationship to related disciplines such as Dance and Psychology.
Identify and discuss the basic premises, theory and approaches of Dance/Movement Therapy.
Be familiar with selected Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and their contribution to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy.
Understand the uses of Dance/Movement Therapy within a variety of settings and populations.
Be familiar with training process and requirements for Dance Movement Therapy certification.
Apply selected Dance/Movement Therapy techniques and approaches to their own experience

The class will be both experiential and academic and does not require any previous movement experience. The course is appropriate for those interested in Psychology, Education, Music Therapy, Social Work and Movement Studies. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277.

***********************************************************

Body Works: Introduction to Somatic Studies
DNCE 1500 sect. 50 (2 credits); Spring 2006 - Wednesdays 6:15-8:15 (1/17-5/5)

Somatic Studies is an emerging and growing field that examines the ways our bodies, minds, and emotions are interrelated and how those relationships are expressed in and changed through working with our body patterns. The various therapies in this field work with the body in order to promote change and healing. Somatic techniques are categorized as body manipulation and movement techniques within the field of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine.

In this course, the student will be introduced to the field of Somatic Studies and will experience a range of Eastern and Western approaches and techniques. Classes will use readings, discussion, experiential and group learning methods to facilitate the students understanding. The course fulfills a Dance Ethnology requirement and is appropriate for those interested in Kinesiology, Physical Therapy, Performance, Dance, Movement Studies, Sports, Sports Medicine and Complimentary and Alternative Medicine. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277.

Specific goals include:
Introduction of history, basic concepts, theory and techniques of Somatic Studies
Introduction of specific Eastern and Western traditions
Exploration and development of personal Somatic Profile
Experience and meet practitioners of alternative techniques
Examination of differences between Eastern and Western body-based approaches


The instructor, Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA, CMA, ADTR, is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/Psychotherapist and has worked in both hospitals and private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Womens Studies and Theater and has also been an Artist-in-Residence. She has taught at the University of Minnesota, St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania. . She currently teaches at the Center for Spirituality and Healing at the U of M and has a private practice as a Dance/Movement Therapist/Psychotherapist.

Posted by kenne064 at 3:13 PM

September 9, 2005

Classes

Dear CSPP students:

Richard Krueger is the "king" of focus group research. You might want to consider one of these course options below depending on your interests, your schedule, and your finances.

Pat

Focus Group Interviewing Courses
University of Minnesota
College of Education & Human Development
Educational Policy and Administration


Weekend Class in Rochester
EdPA 5524 Evaluation Colloquium -- Focus Group Interviewing
1 credit in Rochester
Friday 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm, Saturday 8:00 am 4:00 pm, Nov 11 12, 2005

This workshop provides participants with the opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct focus group interviews. Those attending will learn and practice techniques that result in successful focus groups. The workshop is an intensive (yet enjoyable) training opportunity conducted using lectures, small group discussions and case studies. Participants will learn about focus group interviewing and how it applies to their organizational environment. Attention is placed on using focus groups in organizations where rapid information is needed for decision-making.


Intensive Week-long Class on Twin Cities Campus
EdPA 5080 Special Topics: Conducting Focus Group Interviews
3 credits on St. Paul campus
Offered during winter break 2006
January 9 13 and March 25 8:00 am 4:00 pm

This workshop provides participants with an in-depth opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct focus group interviews. During the course the participants will learn about, discuss alternatives and then practice the array of skills needed in focus group research. Students will be expected to actually conduct a focus group study and report results at the final class session. Attention is placed on using focus groups in environments suitable for academic research, health, medical, educational, governmental and non-profit environments.

Instructor: Dr. Richard Krueger. Richard is a past president of the American Evaluation Association and is a Senior Fellow in the Evaluation Studies Unit of EdPA at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books on focus group interviewing and has consulted and taught focus group skills throughout the United States.

For more information contact: Richard Krueger at rkrueger@umn.edu


Evaluation Course Taught in Rochester 2005
University of Minnesota
College of Education & Human Development
Educational Policy and Administration


Richard Krueger will be teaching EdPA 5501 / EPsy 5243 over a series of 3 weekends this fall in Rochester. This course has offered on the Twin Cities campus for a number of years and has been popular with both graduates and undergraduates. The Rochester section will be similar to the campus course, but offered during a series of weekends. Students attending the Twin Cities campus are welcome to sign up for the Rochester class.

EdPA 5501/ EPsy 5243 (Section 003) Principles and Methods of Evaluation
3 credits in Rochester
Friday evening and Saturday --Sept 30 Oct 1, Oct 14-15, and Nov. 4-5
This is an introductory course in designing program evaluations. Topics include how to frame an evaluation study; how to examine a program's context; how to select appropriate methodology; and how to remain attentive to issues of diversity and multiple audiences. The course will also teach students survey and observation skills.

Instructor: Dr. Krueger is a past president of the American Evaluation Association and is a Senior Fellow in the Evaluation Studies Unit in EdPA at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of several books on focus group interviewing.

For more information contact

Richard Krueger at rkrueger@umn.edu
or
Joseph Marchesani, Program Director
Baccalaureate Degrees and Graduate Education Programs
University of Minnesota Rochester
joseph.marchesani@roch.edu 507-280-2819

Posted by kenne064 at 9:28 AM

April 25, 2014

Course offering

Dear Professor Turner,

I hope your semester is going well! I just wanted to share some information with you about Stats Camp this Summer. This is the last Summer that Dr. Little will be holding Stats Camp in Lawrence, Kansas. Registration is in full swing and the Early Bird Discount ends this month.
This coming June we have 9 different courses being offered. Please visit the webpage at statscamp.org for more information on the courses, a brief syllabus for each, and registration information. Additional information is also in the attached flyer.
Please feel free to share this information with your students and colleagues.
If you are interested in attending or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me or Beth Grandfield at bethg@ku.edu.

Kindest regards,
Matt Woodard

Administrative Associate

Office of Institutional Research & Planning, Professional Record Online

University of Kansas

Email: mwoodard@ku.edu

Posted by hard0158 at 4:17 PM

May 12, 2010

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Summer 2010

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students' lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student's situation. Students from previous terms consistently report the class as "life-changing" and "meaningful." Many say, "It should be required of all students at the University." and "It was the best course I have ever taken at the University of Minnesota."

The concentrated summer schedule offers an "immersion experience" in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall Emerson, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693 (marsh008@umn.edu). Fees vary for graduate program, undergraduate and continuing education non-degree status. Greatly reduced rates apply for senior citizens. Traditional graded, as well as audited or "S/N" enrollment status options are available.

Dates/Location: June 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, and 25 from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and Saturday June 19 from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Class will be held on the University of Minnesota St. Paul campus in a Classroom Office Building room to be announced.

Posted by rutka005 at 2:29 PM

September 18, 2009

1 Credit classes offered in fall 2009 and spring 2010

This is a list Chanta Fagin put together of 1 credit classes that CSPP students may be interested in.

Fall 2009
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - CAPY

CAPY 5660 ADHD Throughout the Life Span: Perspectives on Diagnosis, Assessment, and Developmental Course
(Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: CAPY 5620, CAPY 5669; prereq Upper div)
Class # 23307 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (11/07/2009 - 11/08/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , August,Gerald , 1 credit , Instructor provides class materials to students on first day of class
CAPY 5666 Aggression and Conduct Problems in Children and Adolescent
Class # 28567 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (10/24/2009 - 10/25/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Bloomquist PhD,Michael Leonard , 1 credit , instructor will provide material for class
CAPY 5671 Suicide Prevention: Examining What Interventions May Alter Suicide Risk
Class # 35873 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 04:30 P.M. , Su (09/27/2009 - 09/27/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie , 08:30 A.M. - 04:30 P.M. , Su (10/04/2009 - 10/04/2009) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie , 1 credit , materials are given to students on first day of class - videotape

Spring 2010
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - CAPY

CAPY 5623 Assessment and Treatment Interventions: Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents
Class # 67593 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Su (01/19/2010 - 05/07/2010) , TCEASTBANK , Klimes-Dougan,Bonnie, Layne,Ann Elizabeth , 1 credit , Class materials will be distributed on the day of class. ,
5 seat(s) reserved for non-PSEO, non-admitted student
CAPY 5630 Workshop: Psychotherapy in Children and Adolescents
Class # 81779 -001 LEC , 08:30 A.M. - 03:30 P.M. , Sa,Su (01/19/2010 - 05/07/2010) ,
MoosT 2-620 , TCEASTBANK , Bloomquist PhD,Michael Leonard , 1 credit , Class materials will be given on the first day of class ,
5 seat(s) reserved for non-PSEO, non-admitted student

Posted by rutka005 at 11:03 PM

December 31, 2008

Classes

Check out this class--CSPP student Angela Browder suggests that it could be a great learning opportunity for TAs and/or future faculty.
---

To U of MN graduate students;

The Office of Information Technology's Digital Media Center would like to invite graduate students to participate in our redesigned digital teaching course (formerly the TAWeb Certification Course). This 2-credit course on web-based teaching and learning is offered in partnership with the School of Nursing as NURS 5113, and will be team-taught by learning technology specialists in OIT. Participants will explore a variety of established and emerging academic technologies through a process that combines experimentation and best practices to create effective, technology-rich learning environments. Open to all graduate students, NURS 5113 meets during the semester from 9:05 to 11am on Thursdays. The course offers technology skill building and pedagogical instruction in a blended learning format that involves both face-to-face and online learning experiences. For more information about this course, please contact Brad Cohen, cohenb@umn.edu.

Regards,

Brad Cohen

--
Bradley A. Cohen, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Digital Media Center
Coordinator for Curriculum Development
Office of Information Technology
612-626-0282
cohenb@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 11:33 AM

December 12, 2008

Classes

CSPH 5555 -- Body and Movement-Based Therapies

The following course may be of interest to your students – please forward. It is available to upper level undergrads and grads.

Thanks!
Carla

CSPH 5555 – Introduction To Body and Movement-Based Therapies

This course will cover the basic theories and approaches of selected Somatic Therapies, including dance, movement and body-based therapies.

Students will learn historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement, dance and somatic re-patterning; demonstrations of specific techniques and application of techniques to specific populations and settings.

The experiential part of the course will include individual, partner and group exercises intended to embody and deepen the topics covered in the class.

Instructor: Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb, CMA, MFA, ADTR

Time and date: Thurs 4:40 – 6:30 PM, 1/20 – 5/8/2009.

Please contact Carla Mantel for registration information: cmantel@umn.edu

Please contact Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb for curriculum information: loebx001@umn.edu


Carla Mantel
Student Services and Academic Programs Coordinator
Center for Spirituality and Healing
Academic Health Center
C593 Mayo Memorial Building, MMC 505
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: 612-624-5166
Fax: 612-626-5280
Email: cmantel@umn.edu

***************************************************************************************************************************************

Spring 2009

CPsy 8360 Seminar: Child Maltreatment

Dante Cicchetti, Ph.D.
Institute of Child Development
Hartup Room 172
Tuesdays, 1:30 to 4 PM

This course will provide students with an overview of the far-reaching effects of child maltreatment from a multiple-levels-of-analysis developmental psychopathology perspective by a world-renowned expert in the field. The course begins with a historical perspective of the study of child maltreatment. Child maltreatment will be defined and cultural and sampling issues, along with intergenerational abuse, will be studied in the beginning weeks. In the following weeks students will study the effects of child abuse on attachment, emotion recognition and emotion regulation, self-development, peer relationships, adaptation to school, memory, behavior problems and psychopathology, resilience, biological sequelae, and genetics. In the final two weeks of the course, students will study research-informed preventive interventions for maltreating families and their offspring, along with future directions for research on this important topic.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:06 AM

November 21, 2008

Classes

Colleagues,

Being individuals who may have an interest in families and family issues, we wanted to let you know about upcoming Special Topics that we are offering this Spring 2009 - registration information is below the course description:

CI 5900 Special Topics in Family, Youth, and Community
Sec 001 - Parents as Couples/Couples as Parents
Sec 003 - Creating Curriculum from Community Settings
Sec 004 - Fatherhood
Sec 006 - Reflections on Family Life

*************************************************************

Sec 001: Parents as Couples/Couples as Parents
1 Credit Registration #: 72330; Instructors: Ted Bowman and Beth Magistad; Saturday, Jan 24, 2009 9:00 am-4:30 pm; Saturday, Feb 07, 2009 9:00 am-4:30 pm

Parents have many roles: children, spouses/partners, siblings, friends, employee, community volunteer . . . the list could go on. In much of parent/family education, primary attention has been given to the role of parenting. In this class, the intersection of two family roles will receive scrutiny and attention: the roles of partner or spouse and of being a parent. The course is designed for parent and family educators in school, community, corporate, and religious settings who work with parents that are also part of a couple relationship. The emphasis of the course will be on working with these people in groups or individual sessions.

*************************************************************

Sec 003: Creating Curriculum From Community Settings

3 Credits Registration #: 74478; Instructor: Robert Shumer; Wednesdays, Spring 2009; Jan 24 through May 8, 2009; 4:40 pm-7:20 pm

Most curriculum courses teach you how to develop curriculum for a specific discipline or subject. They provide goals and learning activities to accomplish those goals. In this course we reverse the process and teach you how to build curriculum from community experiences based on interest. We start with an interest—e.g., fishing, travel, or sports—then build courses around the experiences, covering all the academic subjects found in school and college. You pick the topic or interest area and you explore the learning as you build your own curriculum.

*************************************************************

Sec 004: Fatherhood (online course)
1 Credits Registration #: 74480; Instructor: Chris Buzzetta; Internet Delivered; Five Weeks - Feb 6, through March 13, 2009; Discussion Boards - Fridays-Tuesdays; Live Chats - Thursdays 7:00 pm-7:45 pm

Fathers play unique roles in developmental outcomes for children. Especially prevalent are their impact on social development, cognitive development, and academic achievement. These roles include dad as: 1) economic provider, 2) friend and playmate, 3) caregiver, 4) teacher and role model, 5) monitor and disciplinarian, 6) protector, 7) advocate, and 8) resource. We begin to see fatherhood in its own light apart from motherhood; dads are not just substitute moms. This course will explore the father-child relationship, and participants will explore: attachment theories in relation to fathers, topics of diversity, changing perspectives on masculinity and gender roles, and single fatherhood. They will also discover ways the father-child relationship can be fostered within educational settings.

*************************************************************

Sec 006: Reflections on Family Life
3 Credits Registration #: 76156; Instructor: Lynn Englund; Thursdays, Spring 2009; Jan 20 through May 8, 2009; 4:40 pm-7:20 pm

This course is intended for students who are interested in exploring and reflecting on the richness, complexity, and diversity of family-life experiences and critically examining some of the aims and ideals of family life and the contexts that may influence them to help us arrive at our own understanding of family life and the aims and ideals that they aspire to hold.

*************************************************************

Registration Information:
If you are already admitted as a degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking student at the University of Minnesota, you can register by going to: http://www.onestop.umn.edu/onestop/registration.html

Non-University students are also welcome and are encouraged to enroll for some of these courses. Please complete the enrollment packet* (2 forms) found at: http://cehd.umn.edu/students/Forms/NonDegreeApp.pdf

*You will need Adobe Acrobat or Acrobat Reader to open these PDF documents. You can download a free copy of Acrobat Reader from: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html
__________________________________________________________
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

For more information, contact the course instructor or Heather Cline at fyc@umn.edu. This information subject to change without notice. For updated information, please check http://www.onestop.umn.edu

Please feel free to share this information with individuals you think may be interested. If you need any assistance or additional information, please contact me.

Thanks!
Heather

************************************
Heather Cline
Parent and Family Education
Licensure Coordinator

Family, Youth, and Community
Curriculum and Instruction
245 Peik Hall
159 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

(612) 624-1294 phone
fyc@umn.edu e-mail
***************************************************************************************************************************************

EDPA 5734 Institutional Research in Postsecondary Education
92512 -001 LEC; 04:40 P.M. - 07:20 P.M. , Thursdays (01/20/2009 - 05/08/2009); Nicholson Hall #110; Leonard S. Goldfine, gold154@umn.edu; 2-3 credits

Don't miss this opportunity to gain both theoretical as well as practical experience in the field of Institutional Research.

Institutional Researchers have a variety of job titles depending on where they work: planning offices, assessment, budget, student services, academic affairs, accreditation, and also faculty.

Whether you plan to work directly in an office of Institutional Research or work in the policy arena making use of institutional research products, or even just plan on conducting research on the people and products associated with a college or university, this class will provide you with a base understanding of this rapidly growing field. In addition to readings, classes will include guest speakers - those who work in the field and those who rely on institutional researchers to do their job - and practical exercises in building and maintaining an Office of Institutional Research and/or an Institutional Research agenda. Topics covered include issues in student research such as graduation/retention and other definitions of success; faculty and staff research such as salary equity and tenure; facility research; and much more.

**************************************************************************************************************************************
Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute 2009 - Social Justice in the Era of Accountability
Dates: February 25-27
Location: Holiday Inn Select & Suites, Bloomington, MN http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/sl/1/en/hotel/mspia (near Mall of America and Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport)

University of Minnesota students may receive up to two credits toward evaluation colloquium requirements for the MA and Ph.D. degrees:

Requirements for 1-Credit Option:
• Register for the 1-credit course via OneStop by electing EDPA 5524/EPSY 5246 Evaluation Colloquium section #79766
• Wednesday, February 25 through Friday, February 27.
• S/N Only. Paper required. Instructor: Karen E. Stout.
• Register for the conference by paying the student registration rate of $135.00 (see http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPA/MESI or contact Ann Mavis at mavis001@umn.edu or 612-624-1489).

Requirements for 2-Credit Option:
• Register for the 1-credit course via OneStop by electing EDPA 5524/EPSY 5246 Evaluation Colloquium section #79766. Wednesday, February 25 through Friday, February 27. S/N Only. Paper required. Instructor: Karen E. Stout.
• Register for the 1-credit reflection section via OneStop by electing EDPA 5080 Special Topics: MESI (section 031). #79768
• Class dates: February 20 and March 13, from 4-6 PM. Nicholson Hall 335
• S/N Only. Instructor: Karen E. Stout

• Register for the conference by paying the student registration rate of $135.00 (see http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPA/MESI or contact Ann Mavis at mavis001@umn.edu or 612-624-1489).

Contact Sara Beverage (bever005@umn.edu or 4-7574) to register after January 27, 2009.

OPTIONAL: Pre-Institute Workshops
Monday and Tuesday, February 23 and 24, 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. Cost: $285.00
• Session 1: Introduction to the Field of Program Evaluation; Stacey Stockdill, EnSearch
• Session 2: Focus Group Methods; Richard Krueger, U of MN
Attendance at pre-institute workshops is optional and students do not receive academic credit unless special arrangements have been made with the instructor.

Sponsored by:
• Department of Educational Policy and Administration
• The Evaluation Group, Institute on Community Integration
• Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement
• Minnesota Evaluation Association
Please pass this information along to other students who may be interested in attending. We look forward to seeing you at MESI 2009!

****************************************************************************************************************************************

CI5906 Program Planning in Family Education (3 cr.)
Thursday 4:40-7:20 pm. * Peik Hall, Room 46; open to upper level undergraduates and MA, MEd and PhD students
Instructor: Susan Walker, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum & Instruction (skwalker@umn.edu)

Course description: Professionals in any field who work with families can benefit from understanding approaches to the development, implementation and evaluation of educational programs that help meet learner needs, capitalize on strengths, and program goals. This course provides students with two essential perspectives in educational program planning for family issues - improvement (e.g., objectives-based, outcome driven) and attunement/critical inquiry (e.g., empowerment). Through reading, critical analysis, discussion and in class application, the class will collaboratively explore the perspectives as they best fit with audience needs. Skill building includes program planning in each perspective through the development of independent projects. This semester will explore the use of online technology in the delivery of family education programs from both perspectives, including the idea of social networking as a platform for informal learning.

Posted by lind0449 at 1:37 PM

November 14, 2008

Classes

Spring 2009 - Prevention Science - Child Psychology (CPsy) 8360
Thursdays 1:00-3:30pm, Rapson Hall, Room 13; 3 credits
Instructors: Arthur Reynolds (Child Development), Darin Erickson (Public Health), and Jayne Fulkerson (Nursing)

This course provides an in-depth examination of the prevention science field including theoretical underpinnings, state of research and practice, program development, methodology and data analysis, effects and economic benefits, policy contexts, and dissemination and use. Topics are examined from life course perspectives that include ecological and human capital theories of behavior. Intervention research and programs will be highlighted in the following areas: school failure and learning problems, substance and tobacco use, obesity, and delinquency as well as the promotion of health, mental health, and well-being. The coverage of topics is multidisciplinary which will attract students with interests in education, public health, policy analysis, nursing, child development, psychology, social work, program evaluation, and methodology.

This course is required for the planned graduate minor in Prevention Science. Eleven academic units from the following 6 schools and colleges are represented: Education and Human Development, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Public Health, Nursing, Medicine, and Liberal Arts.

The course is designed for doctoral and advanced master’s students. Students should have one year of research methods and a year of statistics background. The course will be limited to 15 students. Contact Professors Erickson (erickson_d@epi.umn.edu), Fulkerson (fulke001@umn.edu), and Reynolds (ajr@umn.edu) for further information.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:56 AM

November 7, 2008

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing - National Resilience Resource Center - University of Minnesota
CSpH 5201 - Spring 2009

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

2009 Dates:
Meets 4:30-8:00 p.m.(Wednesdays 1/21, 2/4, 2/25, 3/25, 4/29) and two Saturdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (1/24 and 2/28)) for a total of seven sessions. Twin Cities campus, Nolte Center, Room 125

*************************************************************************************************************************************

COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT

Psy 8502: Assessment * Spring Semester 2009 * 3 Credits

Wednesdays 3:30-5:00 p.m. (Lecture); Fridays 9:00-10:30 a.m. (Lab)
N595 Elliott Hall; Instructor: Laura Pendergrass, Ph.D., L.P.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basics of psychological assessment. The course will introduce students to the development and applications of specific instruments commonly used in counseling settings. Both clinical and vocational assessments will be discussed. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play activities, and in-class demonstration of assessment and test interpretation techniques. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop their own assessment and test interpretation skills through applied practice in the laboratory component of the class, which includes working with research participants who will play the role of "clients." The class will encourage students to use psychological testing to develop a deeper understanding of clients, including the cultural contexts in which people live, as part of stronger case conceptualization and treatment planning.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

**************************************************************************************************************************************

*EDPA 5734 Institutional Research in Postsecondary Education*
92512 -001 LEC; 04:40 P.M. - 07:20 P.M. , Thursdays (01/20/2009 - 05/08/2009); Nicholson Hall #110
Leonard S. Goldfine, gold154@umn.edu; 2-3 credits

Don't miss this opportunity to gain both theoretical as well as practical experience in the field of Institutional Research. Institutional Researchers have a variety of job titles depending on where they work: planning offices, assessment, budget, student services, academic affairs, accreditation, and also faculty.

Whether you plan to work directly in an office of Institutional Research or work in the policy arena making use of institutional research products, or even just plan on conducting research on the people and products associated with a college or university, this class will provide you with a base understanding of this rapidly growing field. In addition to readings, classes will include guest speakers - those who work in the field and those who rely on institutional researchers to do their job - and practical exercises in building and maintaining an Office of Institutional Research and/or an Institutional Research agenda. Topics covered include issues in student research such as graduation/retention and other definitions of success; faculty and staff research such as salary equity and tenure; facility research; and much more.
--
Leonard S. Goldfine, Ph.D.
Assistant Director
Office of Institutional Research
University of Minnesota
272-5 McNamara Center
200 Oak St. SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612-625-1481
gold154@umn.edu

*************************************************************************************************************************************

Cooperative Learning in the Classroom and School
- (EPSY 5151)

is again being offered on the first five Saturdays of Spring Semester (Jan 24, 31, Feb 7,14,21). The class focuses on how to structure cooperative relationships among students to increase the achievement, academic self-esteem and positive attitudes of students. Specific strategies for structuring the cooperation in the groups and teaching leadership, trust building and communication skills will be highlighted as well as the research and theory connected with Social Interdependence. It will be one of the last times this class will be taught by both Roger and David Johnson.

Anyone interested who has questions can contact Roger Johnson at johns009@umn.edu.

Roger Johnson
60 Peik Hall
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455
johns009@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:52 AM

September 26, 2008

Classes

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED)
College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota

Registration is still available for these online courses offered by CEED and beginning in October:

Addressing the Needs of Young Children Who Engage in Challenging Behavior
October 6 to December 8, 2008
Please register soon
Earn a Continuing Education Certificate (24 clock hours)
This online course provides students with an introduction to information needed to evaluate behavior change programs that are helpful with young children who produce challenging behavior. The primary focus of the course will be functional behavioral assessment procedures and a range of positive behavioral support strategies.
Age range: The course materials are best suited to those working with children in the age range of two to seven years old. There is some material suited to younger kids. All the material can also be considered for older kids and lower elementary age.
Instructor Emily Monn is a Graduate Research Assistant for CEED. She is currently working on the grant Preventing Challenging Behavior in Rural Early Education Settings. Her current research interests are addressing challenging behavior in young children and children with emotional behavior disorders. Emily received her M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis from St. Cloud State University in 2005. In 2005, Emily also earned certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in Educational Psychology, Special Education track, at the University of Minnesota.
Cost
$225 course registration fee, includes CD-ROM
Textbook: $23.25
To Register:
Visit the Addressing Needs description page for more information about the course, instructor, and to print a registration form.

Bridging Education and Mental Health
October 13 to December 15, 2008
Please register soon
Earn a Continuing Education Certificate (24 clock hours)
The goal of this course is to find common ground between behavioral and therapeutic approaches to supporting children who engage in challenging behavior. The course material expands on both the functional behavioral assessment and relationship-based teaching to explore what causes and sustains maladaptive behavioral patterns in children's actions and interactions and how early childhood professionals can support the healthy social and emotional development of children. A continuum of intervention strategies are offered to address the needs of children with varying needs: typically developing children, children with disabilities, and children with and without disabilities who have experienced trauma, neglect, and other environmental and relationships issues.
Instructor Leah Hjelseth's current training, research, and teaching interests center around addressing challenging behavior in early childhood and early childhood social-emotional development. Ms. Hjelseth teaches two online courses for CEED, Bridging Education and Mental Health and Addressing the Needs of Young Children with Challenging Behavior. Leah received her M.A. in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2002. Leah is a doctoral candidate in Educational Psychology with a thesis examining the effects of intensive coaching on teacher behavior aimed at decreasing challenging behavior in children and facilitating social-emotional development.
Cost
$225 course registration fee, textbook $30.00
To Register:
Visit the Bridging Education and Mental Health description page for more information about the course, instructor, and to print a registration form.

Unfamiliar with Distance Education?
Read about how we conduct our online courses.
Questions?
Contact Karen Anderson at 612-625-6617 or ander352@umn.edu.
Please Forward
If you know of organizations or individuals who would be interested in these learning opportunities, please help us get the word out by forwarding this announcement. Thank you.

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED), College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, 56 East River Road, 40 Education Sciences Building, Minneapolis, MN, 55455; phone: 612-625-3058; fax: 612-625-2093; http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:32 PM

September 17, 2008

Classes

Are you looking for a one-credit class to take outside of the department? It is late in the semester to register, but on the chance you are still interested and willing to do the necessary extra work to get registered at this point, here is a listing of all Fall 2008 1 credit courses (outside of Educational Psychology) that involve children, adolescents, or families: Download file

Posted by lind0449 at 3:19 PM

August 22, 2008

Classes

CEED Fall 2008 Online Courses - Registrations Invited
http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed/profdev/onlinecourses/2008OnlineCoursesFlyer.pdf

Seeing is Believing: Videotaping families and using guided self-observation to build on parenting strengths
Instructor: Jill Simon, MS, LICSW, Therapist, Lifetrack Resources, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 8 to December 15, 2008, Please register by September 1

Relationship-based Teaching With Young Children
Instructor: Julie Nelson, Families Together Program, Lifetrack Resources, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 15 to November 10, 2008, Please register by September 8

Parent-Infant Pathways
An Educator's Guide to Providing Information and Support to New Parents
Instructor: Jolene Pearson, MS, Minneapolis Public Schools, (Certificate: 36 clock hours), September 22 to November 24, 2008, Please register by September 15

Introduction to Infant Mental Health
Instructor: Marit Appeldoorn, LICSW; St. David's Child Development and Family Services, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), September 29 to December 1, 2008, Please register by September 22

Addressing Needs of Young Children Who Engage in Challenging Behavior
Instructor: Emily Monn, Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), October 6 to December 8, 2008, Please register by September 29

Bridging Education and Mental Health
Instructor: Leah Hjelseth, MA, Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology, (Certificate: 24 clock hours), October 13 to December 15, 2008, Please register by October 6

Questions?
Contact Karen Anderson at 612-625-6617 or ander352@umn.edu.
Center for Early Education and Development, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, 40 Education Sciences Building, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455; phone: 612-625-3058; fax: 612-625-2093; website: http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:54 AM

August 8, 2008

Classes

EPSY 8400: Special Topics: Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM (3 credits)

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on the promotion of mental health and the prevention of psychological distress across the life-cycle. Major theories of prevention research and applications will be discussed including positive psychology, social justice/advocacy, reasoned action, health beliefs, and youth development. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. The seminar will also include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, prevention within multicultural and international contexts, and prevention and public policy. Students will be asked to tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
College of Education and Human Development
Questions: Contact John. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:47 AM

July 18, 2008

Classes

The Counseling Psychology Program still has space available in two of our courses for Fall 2008. The courses are Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History and Theories and Psy 8503: Interviewing and Intervention. If you are interested in either course please contact Amy Kranz (kranz007@umn.edu).

Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History and Theories
Fall Semester, 2008

3 Credits
Call # 16208
Mon. Weds. Fri. 1:00-2:30 p.m.
N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Patricia Frazier, Ph.D.

The primary purpose of this course is to review the primary theoretical orientations used by practicing psychologists (e.g., cognitive, psychodynamic). Emphasis is placed on the (1) basic principles of each theory, (2) the application of each theory to practice, (3) the empirical support for each theory, and (4) multicultural considerations.

In addition to seminar discussions, presentations, and application exercises, we will have guest speakers talk about each theory and watch videotapes of counseling sessions by practitioners of the various theories.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Psy 8503: Interviewing & Intervention
Fall Semester, 2008

3 Credit
Call # 25714
Tuesdays 1:30-3:00 p.m. (Lecture)
Thursdays 1:00-2:30 p.m. (Lab)
N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: TBA

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and practice in fundamental counseling skills necessary to competently conduct basic assessments, interviews, and interventions with potential clients. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play exercises, and in-class demonstration of interviewing and assessment techniques. In addition, the course includes an interviewing laboratory, where students will have the opportunity to conduct counseling interviews and basic assessments with research participants who will play the role of "clients." Infused throughout the course is an emphasis on empirically supported treatments and components of therapy, working within a scientist-practitioner framework, ethical considerations, and the cultural contexts in which people seek and receive help.

If you would like to enroll in the course, please leave your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number with Amy Kranz (625-3873; kranz007@umn.edu). Class limited to 10 students.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:24 AM

July 11, 2008

Classes

Please let your students know about two special courses that I will be teaching this fall: Introduction to Dance Movement and Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis

Please help me spread the word about these courses. If you have any questions or know anyone who might be interested in it, please feel free to contact me at 612-925-5277 or loebx001@umn.edu. If you have questions about registering please contact the U of M Dance Department at 612-624-5060.
Thank you.

Introduction to Dance Movement (Dance 3334/5334)
This course is offered through the Dance Department. Dance/Movement Therapy is a creative and expressive arts psychotherapy. It is of interest for any students interested in the uses of body, movement, psychology or creative expression and psychotherapy and healing. Please help spread the word to any interested students you know. This course also fulfills a requirement for the graduate level Dance Movement Therapy certification. It can be taken at either the graduate or undergraduate level.

Introduction to Dance/Movement Therapy
Dance 3334/5334 -U of M Dance Department/Fall 2008 Wednesdays 2:05-3:35 - 2 Credits

Course Description: This course is a basic introduction to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. It will include 1) historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement and dance in relationship to psychology and healing; 2) an introduction to some of the major Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and techniques; and 3) a brief introduction to ways that Dance/Movement Therapy is used with various populations and in a variety of settings. The class is both experiential and didactic.

Objectives: The student will be able to: . Describe the field of Dance/Movement Therapy in relationship to related disciplines such as Dance and Psychology. . Identify and discuss the basic premises, theory and approaches of Dance/Movement Therapy. . Be familiar with selected Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and their contribution to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. . Understand the uses of Dance/Movement Therapy within a variety of settings and populations. . Be familiar with training process and requirements for Dance Movement Therapy certification. Apply selected Dance/Movement Therapy techniques and approaches to their own experience.

The class will be both experiential and academic and does not require any previous movement experience. The course is appropriate for those interested in Psychology, Education, Music Therapy, Social Work and Movement Studies. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277. Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis (Dance 3333/5333) This course can also be taken as an upper level course. Please contact me for more details. I would also be happy to answer any questions you or your students might have, or to meet with you (at your convenience) to tell you more about this class. (3500 Directed Study for ICP students.)

Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis
DNCE 3333/5333 2 credits
Wed. afternoons- 12:20-1:50 pm

Audience: Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is a comprehensive language for analyzing movement, and is an important tool for any field that is involved with the study and understanding of movement and non-verbal behavior, including psychology/therapy, education, non-verbal communication, kinesiology and performance. It is relevant to students interested in Dance, Theater, Performance Arts, Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology.

The study of LMA paradigm develops an ability to observe and work with all forms of movement. It can be used to observe and work with the psychological, social and cultural aspects of movement patterns, and leads to a more articulate understanding of the communicative and expressive aspects of movement.

This course will introduce participants to all aspects of the LMA system, through movement exercises, live and video observation, verbal movement analyses, and, most importantly, the actual moving experience of the theory.


INSTRUCTOR BIO Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA CMA ADTR received an MFA in Dance from Temple University (Philadelphia), is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/ psychotherapist and has worked in area hospitals as well as in private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Women's Studies and Theater departments and has also been an Artist-in-Residence and has taught at other colleges and universities including St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:31 AM

May 16, 2008

Classes

Summer Session 1 credit Social Work class - Register now!

INTRODUCTION TO VITAL INVOLVEMENT PRACTICE (VIP)

Professor Helen Kivnick, Social Work: SW 5810, 1 credit

June 20 & June 27, 2008 • 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM • 39 Peters Hall

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Vital involvement practice (VIP) is an emerging strategy for promoting client strengths and assets, while ameliorating problems and treating disorders. The approach is useful with clients of all ages, explicitly focusing both clinician and client on identifying multifaceted client strengths, and on creatively using these strengths to achieve specific client goals.

VIP represents an application or “translation?, in practice, of Erik H. Erikson's bio-psycho-social theory of life-cycle development. As described by Erikson near the end of his life, psychosocial health rests on an individual’s vital involvement with such elements of the environment as people, activities, materials, ideas, relationships, institutions, animals, and more. Vital involvement is the basis for developing individual strengths and for exercising these strengths in the process of living robustly through the life cycle. Underlying VIP, therefore, is the conviction that along with treating client problems and pathologies, practitioners (social service, mental health, and health care providers) must also attend to individuals’ strengths, assets, and abilities to make contributions to the social environment. This construct of vital involvement was developed in a five-year collaboration by Erik Erikson, Joan Erikson, and Helen Kivnick, and was explicitly introduced in their book Vital Involvement in Old Age (1986).

VIP rests on two specific clinical skills – both mediated by newly developed data gathering tools. The first skill is that of promoting vital involvement (PVI). The second skill is the ability to utilize PVI in a 5-step process that, broadly, works to identify client life strengths and then utilize these strengths both to overcome immediate obstacles, and also achieve client goals.

Students will be introduced to VIP, its theoretical foundations (in social work, psychology, and occupational science), and its clinical components. After developing initial facility with PVI, in class, students will work through the complete 5-step process with the professor’s guidance – also in class. Each student will also work through the steps, out of class, with a “friendly volunteer.? Sample protocols and case material from pilot research will be discussed in class, along with the thinking that underlies each protocol.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Students will understand the principles and theoretical foundations of VIP, and with how to utilize these principles to help empower clients in living their everyday lives.
Students will be familiar with the skill of PVI and with the sequential steps of the VIP approach.
Students will have completed two PVI worksheets and two VIP assessment-and-life-planning workbooks.
Students will know enough about elements of the VIP approach to know how it can be incorporated into their own practice, and to identify needs for further instruction

Posted by lind0449 at 10:16 AM

May 9, 2008

Classes

The Counseling Psychology Program has space available in two of our most popular courses. Both course are offered in the Fall of 2008. If you are interested in registering for either course or would like additional information, please contact Amy Kranz (kranz007@umn.edu; 612-625-3873).

*COURSE ANNOUNCEMENTS*

Psy 8501: Counseling Psychology: History & Theories (call #: 16208) Offered - Mon, Wed, & Fri 1-2:30pm in N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Dr. Patricia Frazier
Course Description: The primary purposed of this course is to review the primary theoretical orientations used by practicing psychologists (e.g., cognitive, psychodynamic). Emphasis is placed on the (1) basic principles of each theory, (2) the application of each theory to practice, (3) the empirical support for each theory, and (4) multicultural considerations. In addition to seminar discussions, presentations, and application exercises, we will have guest speakers talk about each theory and watch videotapes of counseling sessions by practitioners of the various theories.

Psy 8503: Interviewing & Interventions (call # 25714) Offered - Tuesdays 1:30-3:00pm (lecture) and Thursdays 1:00-2:30pm (lab) in N595 Elliott Hall
Instructor: TBA
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and practice in fundamental counseling skills necessary to competently conduct basic assessments, interviews, and interventions with potential clients. The course format involves lecture, discussion, case presentations, counseling role-play exercises, and in-class demonstration of interviewing and assessment techniques. In addition, the course includes an interviewing laboratory, where students will have the opportunity to conduct counseling interviews and basic assessments with research participants who will play the role of "clients." Infused throughout the course is an emphasis on empirically supported treatments and components of therapy, working within a scientist-practitioner framework, ethical considerations, and the cultural contexts in which people seek and receive help.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:59 PM

May 2, 2008

Classes

New Educational Psychology Course—Fall 2008
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program

EPSY 8400-001:
Theory and Application of Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle
(3 credits)

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on issues related to the promotion of mental health and well-being across the lifecycle. Readings and discussions will address theories, research, and applications of prevention as an important area of scholarship across multiple disciplines. Major theoretical models that anchor prevention research and applications, e. g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Health Beliefs Model, Social Justice/Advocacy, and Positive Psychology, will be discussed. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in various settings such as schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. In addition, the seminar will include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, and prevention within multicultural and international contexts. Students will tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.
Enrollment Limited

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
http://cehd.umn.edu/EdPsych/Faculty/Romano.html
(For samples of recent publications)

Questions: Contact Dr. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 11:25 AM

April 25, 2008

Classes

New Educational Psychology Course—Fall 2008
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program

EPSY 8400: Theory and Application of Prevention Science: Enhancing Well-Being and Mental Health across the Life Cycle (3 credits)

Fall Semester: Thursdays, 2:30-5:00 PM

Course Summary: This seminar will take an interdisciplinary perspective on issues related to the promotion of mental health and well-being across the lifecyle. Readings and discussions will address theories, research, and applications of prevention as an important area of scholarship across multiple disciplines. Major theoretical models that anchor prevention research and applications, e. g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Health Beliefs Model, Social Justice/Advocacy, and Positive Psychology, will be discussed. Students will become familiar with best practice prevention interventions in various settings such as schools, communities, work places, and health care facilities. In addition, the seminar will include research and evaluation strategies for prevention interventions, prevention ethics, and prevention within multicultural and international contexts. Students will tailor assignments to their areas of interest, discipline, and professional goals.

Prerequisite: Graduate student in the social, educational, and health sciences.
Enrollment Limited

Instructor: John L. Romano, Professor, Educational Psychology
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Program
http://cehd.umn.edu/EdPsych/Faculty/Romano.html
(For samples of recent publications)

Questions: Contact Dr. Romano: roman001@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 9:27 AM

January 18, 2008

Classes

Dear CSPP students: Anna Mraz, a CSPP grad, was just hired by CSPP to strengthen the CSPP student personnel/higher education track in response to feedback given by students interested/exploring this area. We are very pleased to welcome Anna! Based on your input and the input of your student reps this past fall semester, we approached the Educational Psychology department and chair and are grateful that they allowed us to search and create this position on such short notice and, hence, a new pilot course has been created so suddenly. This spring semester, Anna will be supervising student personnel/higher education practicum students in addition to teaching the course listed below. Anna brings a wealth of experience in college student development, understands the needs of CSPP students, and has created an exciting contemporary course filled with seasoned college student development guest speakers. Because CSPP and the dept of Educational Psychology are trying to gauge the interest and viability of future courses like this, I urge you to seriously consider registering for this course to represent student interest in this area so that we can justify enhancing this area of CSPP in the future. Thank you for your consideration. Michael Goh.

Interested in college student development and careers in student personnel?

Register for EPsy 5400 (reg#92419)!

EPsy 5400: Current Issues in College Student Development
Registration # 92419
3 credits – Spring 2008
Tuesdays, 4:40 – 7:20pm
226 Appleby Hall

Instructor:
Anna Mraz, M.A.
Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology
143 Education Sciences Building - 56 East River Road
(612)626-7907
mrazx002@umn.edu

This course will aim to address issues that current student affairs professionals may encounter on the job and will introduce future student affairs professionals to issues in the profession. Students will also have the opportunity to practice and refine their counseling and interviewing skills through case scenarios and role plays.

Objectives for this course will include:

1. Students will gain an increased understanding of the current issues in college student development.
2. Students will practice and discuss counseling and interviewing techniques relevant for working with students facing various issues during their development in college.
3. Students will learn how and where to access information in order to stay informed about current issues in the profession.

Guest speakers, lectures, class projects, relevant readings and discussion will be used. Topics to be covered may include (this list is subject to change):

• College Student Development as a profession • Effective interventions for academically underprepared or at-risk students • Crisis Intervention for Student Affairs Professionals • Effects of parent involvement on college student development • Working with Non-Traditional Students: Issues for Student Affairs Professionals • Unique concerns affecting the development of international and multicultural students • And more!

For questions about this course, contact the instructor at mrazx002@umn.edu or 612/626-7907.

Posted by lind0449 at 4:10 PM

January 11, 2008

Classes

Improve your Spanish skills to build stronger relationships with Spanish-speaking clients!

Spring 2008 Medical Spanish Course

The College of Continuing Education will be offering a non-credit Medical Spanish course this spring to meet the growing need for bilingual health professionals. This course will help the medical community improve health care services for Spanish-speaking patients.

Spring 2008 - Span 0344: Advanced Medical Spanish
Tuesday evenings, 6:30pm to 8:30 pm; January 29, 2008 to April 1, 2008
Room 326 Folwell Hall

Prerequisites
Span 0144; two years of college level Spanish or equivalent; department consent.

Course Description
An advanced course designed to help health care professionals communicate with patients who speak Spanish. It will further develop and strengthen the language skills and cultural awareness you already have.

You will:
• Explore more advanced and specific medical vocabulary and phrases to improve your skills in conducting patient interview and physical exams, recording medical history, and understanding the Latin American view of health and health care; and
• Perform individual work on WebCT and CD-ROM. These activities focus on vocabulary, listening, reading, writing, and exploring cultural issues about interviews to a significant number of health care providers who work with the Spanish-speaking community. This is a unique opportunity to get perspectives on health related issues from Chicano/Latino immigrants in the Twin Cities.

This is a zero-credit course with a grade basis of S/N. Academic credit will not be granted.

Instructor
María Emilce López has an M.A. in both ESL and Hispanic Linguistics and teaches in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies. A native of Jujuy, Argentina, she studied and worked as a teacher there. María Emilce develops materials for teaching Spanish for specific purposes as well as creating technology-enhanced learning experiences.

For more information on Span 0344 visit www.cce.umn.edu/creditcourses/courses/medspan/

To register contact the College of Continuing Education at 612-624-4000 or info@cce.umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 3:14 PM

July 27, 2007

Classes

Announcement from Thom Swiss regarding a fall course offering in Department of Curriculum and Instruction:

NEW FALL COURSE COUNTS AS EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS COURSE (CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS)

CULTURAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION
(CI 8150: Research Topics Curr & Instruction)

Instructor: Professor Thom Swiss (swiss@umn.edu)) Mondays, 4:40-7:20; Peik Hall 27

Cultural Studies in Education is an interdisciplinary course that brings perspectives from the humanities and social sciences to bear on the study of teaching and learning. Cultural Studies recognizes that educational systems are situated in the contexts of culture, knowledge, and power and that these contexts have created systems of inequity. The course, then, is meant to advance a critical understanding of education though the study of culture and to encourage students to investigate the relationship between schooling, education, culture, and society. In short, students will learn to "do" cultural studies in education.

Readings include (with additional PDFs and Websites):

John Storey, Cultural Theory & Culture: An Introduction, 4th edition
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007). [INTRO]

John Storey, Cultural Theory & Culture: A Reader, 3rd edition
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007). [READER]

Henry Jenkins, Textual Poachers

Course requirements fall into three categories: workshops/ discussion, online posts and brief essays, and projects.

Posted by lind0449 at 8:59 AM

July 13, 2007

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Spring 2008

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact Carla Mantel at the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

2008 Dates:
Meets 4:30-8:00 p.m.(Tuesday 1/22, and Thursdays 1/24, 2/7, 3/27, 4/10, 5/1)
and one Saturday (1/26) from 9a.m. to 5 p.m. for a total of seven sessions.

Posted by lind0449 at 4:18 PM

June 15, 2007

Classes

Center for Early Education and Development (CEED)

CEED Trainings
Does your organization have some extra time for training this summer? Do you have some money to use on training before the end of the fiscal year? CEED can help. We offer trainings on a variety of early education and development topics, including:
· Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health
· Addressing the Needs of Young Children with Challenging Behaviors
· Steps Towards Effective and Enjoyable Parenting (STEEP) and Seeing is Believing (SIB)
· Individual Growth and Development Indicators

For a full list of training topics and more information on how your organization can purchase a CEED training, please visit http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/default.html.

And don’t forget…STEEP™
Steps Toward Effective, Enjoyable Parenting
Relationship-based Strategies for Working with Infants and Families in High-Risk Circumstances

STEEP™ works on the premise that a secure attachment between parent and infant establishes ongoing patterns of healthy interaction. A secure parent-child attachment lays the foundation for later competence and well-being. Through home visits and group sessions, STEEP™ facilitators work alongside parents to help them understand their child’s development. Parents learn to respond sensitively and predictably to their child’s needs, and to make decisions that ensure a safe and supportive environment for the whole family.

Location: 151 Folwell Hall, UMN East Bank
Week-long June session: June 18-22, 2007, 9am-4pm each day
Registration deadline: June 11, 2007 OR until full

Cost: $400 includes registration as well as the manuals and DVD required for the course.

To Register
Print the registration form at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/courses/STEEPRegistrationForm.doc
For more information about this training, visit http://education.umn.edu/ceed/coursesandtrainings/courses/junesteep.htm

Questions?

Contact Sara Zettervall at 612-625-2252 or sarazet@umn.edu.

Read about more CEED events and activities by visiting the CEED web site at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:27 AM

June 1, 2007

Classes

Summer 2007 - Now Enrolling! - EdPA 5048
CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON LEADERSHIP
June 25-29, 2007

This intensive class will introduce participants to the concepts of leadership and culture that influence the functioning of cross-cultural groups and major institutions today. In this workshop, we seek to clarify these concepts and consider how they can be applied to real world situations. The classroom is often such a cross-cultural environment and the teacher has an important leadership role in it. But the scope of the course goes beyond to any situation requiring an international or intercultural leadership. This class will employ a variety of instructional approaches including lectures, critical incidents, case studies, large-group and small-group discussions, a simulation, and problem solving exercises.

This course is designed for students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of leadership and culture. To achieve this goal, the course will use concepts drawn from several academic disciplines and cultural contexts. Students will be expected to integrate these concepts and learn how to translate them from theory to practice. This workshop is not a traditional leadership training program, but an academic course designed to produce understanding of complex social relations phenomena; in this way, it has a meta-learning objective about how to gain knowledge of leadership, institutions and culture.

INSTRUCTORS

Dr. Josef A. Mestenhauser is Distinguished International Emeritus Professor in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration. In his fifty-year career he has published more than 120 books, monographs, articles and book chapters on international education, educational exchanges, international studies, transfer of knowledge, cross-cultural relations, leadership development, cultural change, educational reform and professionalism. He is three-time holder of senior Fulbright grants in the Philippines, Japan and Czechoslovakia.

Dr. Mestenhauser has been President of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, ISECSI (International Society for Educational, Cultural and Scientific Interchanges) and the Fulbright Association of Minnesota, and has held offices in several professional associations.

Dr. Brenda J. Ellingboe has 17 years of experience teaching English, intercultural communication, intercultural leadership, and international education. Since 2000, she has been designing and delivering non-credit continuing education courses for adult learners in 25 companies. She has also taught credit-based intercultural communication courses for two companies, two community colleges, three universities, and three liberal arts colleges. She is the owner of Be Globally Focused, a consulting service that promotes intercultural competence at the individual and organizational levels. She has taught intercultural leadership courses for Century College since 2002 and initiated their new Intercultural Leadership Certificate program, the first in the Midwest.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:47 AM

May 25, 2007

Classes

CI 8150: Research Topics Curriculum and Instruction
Action Research in Teaching and Teacher Education
3 credits - Summer 2007 - July 9 – 20, 2007 - 9:00 – 12:30

[reading list will be available in June]
Visiting Scholar Ken Zeichner, University of Wisconsin, Madison
&
Misty Sato, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Course Description
In this course, we will explore various aspects of a movement in education and educational research in which educational practitioners (e.g., P-12 teachers, school administrators, professors, etc.) are viewed as researchers of their own practice and in which teaching is viewed as a form of educational inquiry. The course will provide you with a broad overview of some of the epistemological, political, and methodological issues associated with the idea of practitioner research. Throughout the course, we will be reading work by both practitioner researchers and academics about the process of practitioner research and about the specific questions and issues that have been investigated through practitioner research. The term practitioner research in this course will be used as a generic descriptor that describes all of its different varieties (e.g., action research, teacher research, self-study research, etc.).

About Ken Zeichner
Ken Zeichner is Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Teacher Education and Associate Dean, University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition to his responsibility for the teacher education programs at his university as Associate Dean, he coordinates a Professional Development School Partnership involving 5 schools in the Madison school district.

He was Vice President of Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) of the American Educational Research Association from 1996-98, a member of the Board of Directions of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education from 1997-2000, and is currently a member of the Board of the National Society for the Study of Education.

He was previously affiliated as a principal investigator with the National Centers for Research on Teacher Education and Teacher Learning at Michigan State University (1985-1995), the National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching, and is currently involved in the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching study of Teacher Education and was co-chair of the AERA Consensus Panel on Teacher Education.

His publications include Teacher education and the social conditions of schooling (1991) with Dan Liston, Issues and Practices in Inquiry Oriented Teacher Education (1991) with Bob Tabachnick, Reflective Teaching and Culture and Teaching (1996) with Dan Liston, Currents of Reform in Preservice Teacher Education (1996) with Susan Melnick and Mary Gomez, Democratic Teacher Education Reform in Africa: The Case of Namibia (1999) with Lars Dahlstrom, "Practitioner Research" with Susan Noffke in the Handbook of Research on Teaching (4th edition) (2001), and "Educational Action Research" in The Handbook of Action Research (2001).

Posted by lind0449 at 1:46 PM

May 4, 2007

Classes

Summer 2007 Disability Courses
For community professionals and University students

Offered through the Institute on Community Integration and the Department of Educational Policy and Administration, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota

Disability Policy & Services (EdPA 5356, 3 cr) June 11-22, 8a.m.-noon (M-F) This course will examine current policy, research, and practices related to services that support individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. The course will engage students with leading researchers and experts, emphasizing policy development and implementation, and collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches to services. It will especially focus on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in life domains such as education, employment, health, recreation, community living, and family supports. The course is the core course for the Certificate in Disability Policy and Services, a 12-credit interdisciplinary program studying services and supports for persons with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities.

Person-Centered Thinking & Planning for Persons with Disabilities (EdPA 5080, 3 cr, CEUs available) July 9-20, 8 a.m.-­noon (M-F) This course will draw on the expertise of University faculty and researchers, as well as individuals with disabilities, family members, and community professionals, to provide an overview of person-centered thinking and planning for persons with disabilities, with an emphasis on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. It will include a focus on the evolution of person-centered thinking, and in-depth examination of contemporary applications. Among topics discussed are self-determination, community inclusion, self-advocacy, rights/choice, person-centeredness, dignity/respect, cultural sensitivity, and collaboration.

For further information about course content, or the College's Certificate in Disability Policy and Services, contact Marijo McBride at the Institute on Community Integration, 612/624-6830 or mcbri001@umn.edu. For summer class registration information, contact the College's Office of Student and Professional Services at 612/625-6501 or spsinfo@umn.edu. Information about CEUs is available from Continuing Professional Studies at 612/625-5060 or cpstudy@umn.edu. General information is also online at www.education.umn.edu.

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CI 8150: Culture and Teaching Colloquium: Theorizing Culture and Teaching
Primary Instructor: Bic Ngo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fall 2007; Wednesdays, 1:25-4:05pm: 3 Credits
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course Description
The Culture and Teaching doctoral track addresses teaching, learning, and curriculum in social and cultural contexts. The program affirms that education is influenced by social, cultural, political, and economic formations and structures. The study of education cannot neglect the interconnections between experiences and practices in homes and communities—at local, national, and global levels—and experiences and practices in schools and classrooms. The track also assumes that educators’ and learners’ identities and experiences profoundly impact teaching, learning, and learning to teach.

The colloquium will explore interdisciplinary perspectives on a theme central to the cultural study of teaching and learning such as urban education, social theories of knowledge, race, media and education. All four faculty (Ngo, Sato, Swiss, Lensmire) in Culture and Teaching will share in the coordination and teaching of the colloquium using a team teaching approach.

In Fall 2007, the theme for the Colloquium will be Theorizing Culture and Teaching. The purpose of this seminar is to provide an introduction to some of the theories and theorists that have been influential in thinking and theorizing about culture and teaching. The CaT faculty will lead seminar participants in the exploration of theories/theorists that have informed our thinking/researching/writing about education, youth and families. We will read primary texts of theorists such as Anzaldua, Bakhtin, Barthes, and Godamer. We will then examine educational research that has drawn on these theories.

Course Goals
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Understand some part of the rich history of theories that have informed the way we think about culture and teaching.
• Evaluate diverse approaches to thinking and writing about theories in research on culture and teaching.
• Identify relationships between the multiple facets of the theories that have influenced research on culture and teaching.
• Develop theories of/approaches to researching or teaching about theorizing culture and teaching.

For more information, contact Bic Ngo at bcngo@umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:15 AM

April 24, 2007

Classes

Announcing May Session and Summer Session Courses in Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology!

Please note two special topics courses that will be offered during the May session taught by CSPP faculty member Tom Skovolt:

EPSY 5400 Special Topics in Counseling Psychology (max credits 8; 8 repeats allowed)
EPSY 5400 -101, 09:05 A.M. - 04:25 P.M. , W,Th (06/06/2007 - 06/07/2007) , BuH 123 , TCEASTBANK , Skovholt,Thomas M (Morse Alumni Award), Resiliency Dev for Couns, Teachers & Health Prof , 1 credit

EPSY 5400 -102, 09:05 A.M. - 04:25 P.M. , W,Th (05/23/2007 - 05/24/2007) , PeikH 335 , TCEASTBANK , Skovholt,Thomas M (Morse Alumni Award), Helping Skills for Advisors , 1 credit


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Hello Fellow CSPP Students!

I am happy to announce a course called Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing to be offered this summer, June 11th - June 15th from 9:00-11:30 each day (M-F). The course description and goals are listed below. If you have any questions about the course, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,
Michelle Trotter
trot0026@umn.edu

Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing EPsy 5400-001: Special Topics - 1 credit - June 2007 9:00-11:30 a.m., June 11, 12, 13, 14 & 15

Course Description This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work, nursing and related fields. The course will use practice and scholarly research to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing. The course will have an experiential component through which students will practice the various interventions being studied. The course will also draw on the expertise of guest speakers to augment course readings, lecture, class discussions and in-class activities.

Course Goals This course is designed to give practitioners and students in the helping professions an introduction to mind-body and creative approaches to promote therapeutic growth. Through in-class activities the course will allow students to immerse themselves in the various techniques, with the ultimate goal of integrating what they learn in class to current or future therapeutic environments. Each topical area will include a review of the literature on the topic. Research findings and experiential work will be combined in an exploration of the topics.

--
Michelle Trotter, MA
Doctoral Candidate
Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology Educational Psychology Department trot0026@umn.edu

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New Special Topics Summer Course!
EPSY 5400-002: Crisis Intervention in Mental Health Settings
1 credit
June 16-16, 9:00-4:30

This course is designed to introduce students to the major features of client-related crises that occur in mental health settings, including community agencies and college counseling centers. It will provide students with the opportunity to learn both theory and practical skills related to crisis intervention. Experiential learning through role-playing and group exercises will supplement lecture and class discussion. Guest speakers will present on related topics.

Sample Topics:
-Assessment and intervention with suicidal and potentially violent clients
-Working with victims of sexual violence
-Vicarious traumatization and clinician self-care

Contact the instructor, Sandra Sanger, MA, LPC at engx0021@umn.edu with questions.

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Spirituality and Resilience
Center for Spirituality and Healing - National Resilience Resource Center - University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201- Summer 2007 - Location TBA

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.
• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated summer schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693.(kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available.

Dates/Location: June 11, 13, 15, 20, 21 and 25, 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; Saturday June 16, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Class will be on the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Specific room location will be announced.

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CI 8155: Immigrant Families and U.S. Schools
Fall 2007 - Instructor: Bic Ngo
Mondays, 4:40pm-7:20pm

"Today one in five children in the United States is the child of immigrants, and it is projected by 2040 one in three children will fit this description. Given the numbers involved, how these children adapt and the educational
pathways they take will have clearly profound implications for our society." -Carola Suarez-Orozco

This course will examine the educational experiences of contemporary immigrants (post-1965) in U.S. schools. We will explore the concerns and debates surrounding immigration, assimilation and acculturation to the U.S. We will then take a closer look at the research on various immigrant groups and examine the major issues that are confronted by immigrant families and youth in U.S. schools and society. In this course, we will shift from simplistic theoretical models of immigrant assimilation and highlight instead the experiences of immigrant families and youth as those that change and respond to external—structural, ideological, cultural—forces in U.S. society.

Course Objectives
• To provide students with the background necessary to understand current issues and debates about immigration to and immigrants in the United States, particularly as it pertains to education and academic achievement
• To convey the complexity of the political, social and economic contexts surrounding the experiences of immigrants in U.S. schools and society
• To illustrate the impact (and intersections) of gender, race, class, language and culture on the experiences of immigrants in U.S. schools and society
• To complicate theoretical conceptualizations of the immigrant experience in U.S. schools and society

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Center for Early Education and Development (CEED) and Institute of Child Development (ICD)
College of Education and Human Development
University of Minnesota
~~ Announcing a New Educational Opportunity ~~

Please note: This Certificate Program is under review for approval by the Regents. (See statement included on main IECMH web page for specifics on this point.) The web site will make note when this approval is official.

The Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Certificate Program

Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health is an emerging area of scholarship, research, and public service that defies contemporary disciplinary boundaries. Individuals working in many types of settings will benefit from this program of study. The certificate program will present cutting edge research and theory coupled with interdisciplinary practices applicable to all work with young children and their families.

We Invite Your Applications

You are invited to apply for admission into the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Certificate Program (IECMH), which begins its first two-year cohort in August 2007.

Intended Participants
Persons who may be candidates for this program include (but are not limited to) early childhood educators, parent educators, social workers, home visitors, doulas, midwives, Part C service coordinators, NICU nurses, public health nurses, clinical nurse practitioners, therapists, supervisors, early intervention specialists, policy specialists, physicians, faculty members, and graduate students.

Two Tracks
A hallmark of the Certificate's curriculum is the creation of two tracks:

Clinical Track:
Credentialed mental health professionals who wish to build their knowledge and skills in infant and early childhood mental health, dyadic or triadic treatment, and reflective consultation.

Community Track:
Front-line professionals who work with young children and their families (e.g., public health nurses, parent educators, child welfare workers, early interventionists, and early childhood educators) who often confront complex mental health issues for which they feel unprepared.

Two Credit Options
Additionally, students who enroll in the IECMH Certificate Program may choose to earn CEUs/clock hours or academic (professional) credits. Academic credits are offered through the Institute of Child Development with (ICD) courses designated "Child Psychology (CPsy)."

More Information and How to Apply
For comprehensive information about this Certificate Program and application materials, visit the IECMH Certificate Program web page at http://education.umn.edu/ceed/iecmhcp.

Questions?
Contact Patricia Kester, Program Coordinator, at 612-626-9579 or email kest0026@umn.edu.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:42 AM

March 2, 2007

Classes

ATTENTION: Professionals and Graduate Students Interested in Working with Parents and Families

The University of Minnesota is offering graduate level parent education courses online for the first time.

The parent education courses are graduate level and offered in sequence beginning in June of each year. The instructors and students are immediately actively engaged together and build relationships as they complete the sequence of courses. This program prepares parent educators to work in Minnesota’s Early Childhood Family Education (ECFE) programs and other Minnesota settings and in other states and countries.

Online Parent Education COURSES
CI 5932 Introduction to Parent Education – 1 semester credit (Summer 2007)
CI 5942 Everyday Experiences of Families – 2 semester credits (Summer 2007)

For registration information go to: http://www.education.umn.edu/CI/Programs/FYC/parent-course-desc.html

CI 5943 Parent Learning & Development: Implications for Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Fall 2007)
CI 5944 Parent Education Curriculum – 2 semester credits (Fall 2007)
CI 5945 Teaching and Learning in Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)
CI 5946 Assessment & Evaluation in Parent Education – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)
CI 5949 Parent Education Practicum – 2 semester credits (Spring 2008)

Courses required in related areas if obtaining a minnesota teaching license
Family Development – 2 credits minimum (CI 5942 listed above meets this requirement)
Parent-Child Relationships – 3 credits minimum
Child Development – 6 credits minimum

Other Licensure Requirements for those obtaining a Minnesota teaching license
PUBH 6003 Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse – 1 semester credit (online)
EPSY 5135 Human Relations Workshop – 4 semester credits (online)

EXAM - Praxis I: PPST Exam - http://www.ets.org/praxis

If you already hold a Minnesota teaching license or you are not interested in a Minnesota teaching license, PUBH 6003, EPSY 5135, and the Praxis Exam are not required.

IN PROCESS
A Certificate in Parent Education program is in the process of being approved for those completing the online parent education courses and the courses in related areas who are not interested in obtaining the Minnesota teaching license.

For more information about the online parent education courses and Licensure Program, go to:
http://education.umn.edu/CI/Programs/FYC/parent.html or fyc@umn.edu or contact Chris Buzzetta at (612) 624-1294.

Posted by lind0449 at 2:51 PM

January 19, 2007

Classes

Please join us Spring Semester 2007

Violence Can Be Prevented!
PubH 6-123: Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research, and Application
NOTE: THIS COURSE WILL NOT BE OFFERED, AGAIN, UNTIL 2009.
2 credits
Faculty: Mary Findorff, Ph.D., M.P.H. and guest faculty
Time: Mondays, 3:35 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (1st class - January 22nd)

Background: Injuries from all sources are the leading cause of death for persons under the age of 45 years; 38% of the deaths from injury are the result of violence! Types of violence include interpersonal violence such as homicide, assaults, child abuse, intimate partner violence, elder abuse, and self-directed violence, such as suicides and suicide attempts. On an average day in America, 53 persons die from homicide, and a minimum of 18,000 persons survive interpersonal assaults, 84 persons complete suicide, and as many as 3,000 persons attempt suicide.

Costs of this violence to society are enormous. These costs include emergency department visits, inpatient hospital stays, outpatient (including treatment by physicians, chiropractors, psychologists, etc.), lost work days and workers’ compensation costs, years of potential life lost, legal costs, and other costs to the individual, including pain and suffering, disability, and decreased quality of life.

Course Description:Analyses and critique of major theories and epidemiologic research pertinent to violence, including characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors, reporting and treatment protocols, and current/potential intervention efforts and prevention initiatives; emphasis on interdisciplinary contributions to violence prevention and control. For students with interests in violence prevention and control from various disciplines including public health, nursing, law, medicine, social work, law enforcement, education, and psychology, etc., this course provides a foundation essential to the field.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course (PubH 6-123), the student will be able to:
* identify the magnitude of the problem to the degree that it is known, based on peer-reviewed literature and other resources.
* identify and discuss perspectives on the identification and characteristics of violence and relevant risk factors.
* analyze theory and research pertinent to violence.
* describe and critique procedures used in the reporting and treatment of various types of violence.
* identify potential intervention efforts and community initiatives pertinent to violence prevention and control.
* discuss the contributions of various disciplines such as nursing, public health, medicine, law enforcement, education, and social work etc. to violence prevention and control.

Posted by lind0449 at 10:57 AM

January 5, 2007

Classes

EPsy 8800: Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth
Spring Semester, Thursday, 1:25 – 4:15, 3 credits, 303 Elliott Hall
Instructor: Dr. Sandra Christenson

This seminar provides a broad overview of mental health service delivery for children and youth. The seminar is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature, emphasizing mental health service delivery rather than school-based mental health. Consequently, a primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity to educate future mental health service providers about critical issues and strategies unique to the disciplinary course of study of theirs as well as those of others. Class topics include: defining mental health, defining mental health services, clarifying who provides and receives mental health services, mental health legislation and policy (historic/landmark and recent mental health legislation, screening (Identifying at risk youth), prevention, assessment/evaluation, examining mental health interventions (e.g., non-medication interventions/treatment , psychopharmacological interventions) and others. The seminar is designed to include students from varied departments and working toward different degrees (school psychology, counseling, child clinical, family social science, public health, nursing, social work).

Class No. 68825
For more information you can call Deb Lavoie at 624-4156 or email her at lavoi003@umn.edu

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Another 1 Credit option for CSPP Students:

IS THE WORKPLACE SAFE?
PUBH 6122 Seminar: Safety in the Workplace

PLEASE JOIN US! Spring Semester, 2007
1 credit No pre-requisites -- just interested participants!
Faculty: Susan Goodwin Gerberich, Ph.D., M.S.P.H. and guest faculty
Time: Wednesdays, 12:20-2:15 pm (every other week, as follows:01/24; 02/07; 02/21; 03/07; 03/21; 04/04; 04/18; 05/02)
Location: Mayo Memorial Building - D-199

Course Description: The seminar format enables students to understand the realm of and potential risk factors for occupational safety problems, and to identify potential strategies for prevention and control.

Complete description: Download file

Posted by lind0449 at 8:57 AM

December 20, 2006

Classes

Pat McCarthy Veach would like CSPP MA Students to note that this class might be a great 1 credit option for you!

CI 5900 Special Topics in Family, Youth, and Community: Grief, Loss, and Shattered Dreams

Spring 2007
*************************************************************
1 Credit Registration #: 65157, Instructor: Ted Bowman, 315 Peik Hall, Minneapolis Campus

Course is taught over two Saturdays:
Saturday, Feb 24, 2007 9:00 am-4:30 pm
Saturday, Mar 10, 2007 9:00 am-4:30 pm

Ted Bowman has been regularly teaching for family education since 1981. For years, he also worked in family service agencies providing services directly to families and indirectly through training and consultation. He now operates an internationally recognized independent practice specializing in change, transition, grief, loss, and group leadership.

Course Description:
Families can face many challenges including grief and loss. It is important for professionals who work with families to be able to address these important issues. In this applied class, participants will explore:
- A framework for understanding and clarifying losses
- Steps which can be appropriately taken in the parent and family education settings
- Alternative steps to take when referral is warranted.

Posted by lind0449 at 11:02 AM

November 22, 2006

Classes

Spring Semester Higher Education Courses

Hello colleagues

I attach a list of the spring semester higher education offering.

Note that two are co-listed with EPSY.

Download file

DH

Darwin D. Hendel
Associate Professor
Coordinator, Higher Education Program
Department of Educational Policy and Administration
College of Education and Human Development 330 Wulling Hall
86 Pleasant Street
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone (612) 625-0129
FAX (612) 624-3377

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EPsy 8800: Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth
Spring Semester
Thursday, 1:25 – 4:15, (3 credits), 303 Elliott Hall

Instructor: Dr. Sandra Christenson

This seminar provides a broad overview of mental health service delivery for children and youth. The seminar is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature, emphasizing mental health service delivery rather than school-based mental health. Consequently, a primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity to educate future mental health service providers about critical issues and strategies unique to the disciplinary course of study of theirs as well as those of others. Class topics include: defining mental health, defining mental health services, clarifying who provides and receives mental health services, mental health legislation and policy (historic/landmark and recent mental health legislation, screening (Identifying at risk youth), prevention, assessment/evaluation, examining mental health interventions (e.g., non-medication interventions/treatment , psychopharmacological interventions) and others. The seminar is designed to include students from varied departments and working toward different degrees (school psychology, counseling, child clinical, family social science, public health, nursing, social work).

Class No. 68825
For more information you can call Deb Lavoie at 624-4156 or email her at lavoi003@umn.edu

Posted by lind0449 at 10:27 AM

November 10, 2006

Classes

CSpH 5201: Spirituality and Resilience
Spring 2007
Center for Spirituality and Healing, National Resilience Resource Center

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

Posted by lind0449 at 9:22 AM

May 19, 2006

Classes

FROM: Richard Krueger

Senior Fellow – Evaluation Studies -- EdPA

Here are some courses in evaluation, interviewing and focus group interviewing that might be of interest to your students. I will be the instructor for each of these courses. The courses are concentrated opportunities and offered during weekends or semester break. Several are offered at the Rochester University Center.

The Rochester classes (evaluation and interviewing) are offered over a series of week-ends, which make them convenient for students holding down day jobs. In addition, because of the concentrated week-end schedule, the courses have been popular even with students from outside of the Rochester area.

EdPA 5501 / EPsy 5243 -- Principles and Methods of Evaluation offered in Rochester is similar to what is taught here on campus, but concentrated over a series of week-ends.

A new course, EdPA 5080 -- Special Topics: Interviewing Individuals and Adults is a 2- credit course offered in Rochester designed for those interested in doing interviews for evaluation or research. The class seeks to help evaluators and researchers plan, organize, conduct and analyze interviews (individual and group) in a manner that is consistent with quality protocol, ethical responsiveness, and respect for the respondent(s). This course will begin with an overview of evaluation / research interviewing and identify practices and techniques used by experts. The class will cover topics such as planning the interview, setting up the logistics, developing appropriate questions, skills in asking questions, capturing the data, and analyzing results.

EdPA 5080 Special Topics -- Conducting Focus Group Interviews will be offered here in the Twin Cities. This is a 3-credit course next winter that concentrates on focus group interviewing. It will begin in January before the beginning of Spring Semester.

Here are the details:

Fall Semester 2006

EdPA 5501 & EPsy 5243: Principles and Methods of Evaluation

In Rochester, 3 credits, 3 weekends from 5 pm – 9 pm Friday and 8 am – 4pm Saturday.

EA111 - East Hall at the University Center in Rochester.

September 29 - 30, October 27 - 28, and November 10 - 11, 2006. Instructor: Richard Krueger

EdPA 5080: Special Topics: Interviewing Individuals and Groups

In Rochester, 2 credit, 2 weekends: 5 pm – 9 pm Friday & 8 am-4 pm Sat

November 17 - 18, 2006 and December 1 - 2, 2006. Instructor: Richard Krueger

Spring Semester 2007

EdPA 5080: Special Topics: Conducting Focus Group Interviews

In Twin Cities 3 credits, 8am – 4pm

January 11, 12, 13, February 24, March 31, 2007. Instructor: Richard Krueger

Posted by kenne064 at 8:37 AM

May 12, 2006

Classes

Hello Fellow CSPP Students,

I am happy to announce a new course called Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing to be offered this summer, June 5th – June 9th from 9:00-11:30 each day (M-F). This is the first time this course will be taught, so any help in spreading the word to interested students within in CSPP and other programs would be much appreciated. If you have any questions about the course, please feel free to contact me.

Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing, 1 credit

June 5 – 9, M-F, 9:00-11:30

Course Description

This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work, nursing and related fields. The course will use practice and scholarly research to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing. The course will have an experiential component through which students will practice the various interventions being studied. The course will also draw on the expertise of guest speakers to augment course readings, lecture, class discussions and in-class activities.

Sincerely,

Michelle Trotter, MA
trot0026@umn.edu

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Fall 2006 Special Topics
EPsy 8400:
Orientation to Self & Career Teaching Practicum

Tuesdays, 11:00-1:00
Instructor: Dr. Tabitha Grier

A 10 hour per week practicum, you will be trained to use the constructivist career development curriculum for PSTL 1076 Orientation to Self and Career, and you will instruct one section of this two credit course.

*Make yourself more competitive for teaching positions!*

This practicum is designed to help you extend general group and career counseling skills to the domain of teaching and learning. Constructivist career development and relational, active learning paradigms of education will be our focus.

*Integrate group and career counseling skills in the classroom!*

Sensitivity to context and socialization in a multicultural setting is a major feature of this practicum.

*Learn to apply constructivist counseling, teaching, and learning tools in a multicultural classroom!*

Contact Tabith Grier at grier001@umn.edu for more information.

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Hello,
I am writing to let you know about a course that I will be teaching Fall 2006: INTRODUCTION TO LABAN MOVEMENT ANALYSIS (DNCE 1500 section 050). This course can also be taken as an upper level course. Please contact me for more details. I would also be happy to answer any questions you or your students might have, or to meet with you (at your convenience) to tell you more about this class.

Audience: Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is a comprehensive language for analyzing movement, and is an important tool for any field that is involved with the study and understanding of movement and non-verbal behavior, including psychology/therapy, education, non-verbal communication, kinesiology and performance. It is relevant to students interested in Dance, Theater, Performance Arts, Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology.

The study of LMA paradigm develops an ability to observe and work with all forms of movement. It can be used to observe and work with the psychological, social and cultural aspects of movement patterns, and leads to a more articulate understanding of the communicative and expressive aspects of movement.

This course will introduce participants to all aspects of the LMA system, through movement exercises, live and video observation, verbal movement analyses, and, most importantly, the actual moving experience of the theory.


OFFICIAL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND INFORMATION
Course number: DNCE 1500 section 050 2 credits
Course times: Wed. afternoons- 12:20-1:50 pm
Location: TBA (probably at the Barker Center)
Course Instructor: Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb
Loebx001@umn.edu
Phone: 612-925-5277

INSTRUCTOR BIO
Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA CMA ADTR received an MFA in Dance from Temple University (Philadelphia), is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/ psychotherapist and has worked in area hospitals as well as in private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Women’s Studies and Theater departments and has also been an Artist-in-Residence and has taught at other colleges and universities including St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania..

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Merra Young, adjunct faculty at CSPH, is offering a fall semester course on Integrative Psychotherapy: Effective Use of Compassion, Emotional and Spiritual Healing which includes Mindfulness and compassion practice at it's foundation. Csph #5541

Posted by kenne064 at 8:47 AM

April 21, 2006

Classes

CSPP Special Topics Summer Courses:

MAY TERM

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5400-101 84149 9:05-4:25 WTh 5/24/-5/25 PeikH 225 Skovholt

Helping Skills for Advisors

This course will focus on seven areas: the helping process including the cycle of caring; the helping relationship; the exploration of the student’s concerns; promoting student understanding; setting goals; taking action; ethical issues.

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5400-102 81438 9:05-4:25 WTh 6/7-6/8 BuH 125 Skovholt

Resiliency: Development for Counselors, Teachers, and Health Professionals

Being resilient as practitioners requires us to consciously make choices that help sustain the work that we do. The resilient practitioner uses specific strategies to prevent burnout. Resiliency development is expressed with concepts like Boundaried Generosity, Self-Other Differentiation, Outcome Control, Work Reflectivity, Flow, the Process Measure of Success and Re-Creation. In addition, it is important to learn the Cycle of Caring skills of involvement again. This course focuses on the intense work demands experienced by helpers, teachers and healers, and considers practice and research-based solutions.

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5400-103 88261 9:00-11:30 MTWThF 6/5-6/9 BuH 120 Trotter

Integrative Wellness: Mind-Body Approaches

This course will cover mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling, social work and related fields. This class will use scholarly research, experiential exercises, guest speakers and class discussion to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing and creative/art based interventions to promote healing.

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SUMMER TERM

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5400-001 87228 5:00-9:00 F 6/16 McDonald
8:00-4:30 S 6/17

Counseling Needs of Immigrants

This course will begin with a broad description of immigration patterns to the United States, will progress to exploring typical difficulties faced by immigrant groups, and will conclude with a discussion of appropriate counseling interventions. This course will assist those in the helping professions, such as counselors, social workers, and nurses, in deepening their understanding of immigrants and their concerns about living and functioning in the United States. A variety of teaching methods will be utilized, including lecture, large- and small-group discussion, individual research and reading, the internet, and an experiential component.

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5400-002 88486 6:00-8:10 MTWTh 6/12-6/15 Sanger
6:00-8:10 MTW 6/19-6/21

Crisis Intervention in Mental Health Settings

The course is designed to introduce students to the major features of crises that occur in mental health settings, including community agencies and college counseling centers. It will provide students with the opportunity to learn both theory and practical skills related to crisis intervention. Experiential learning through role-playing and group exercises will supplement lecture and class discussion.

Posted by kenne064 at 2:35 PM

April 14, 2006

Classes

To all EAP Professionals:

St Mary's is planning for a May-June 2006 EAP class. They need at a
minimum 8 enrollees.
If you are working toward your CEAP and need credits or are due for a
recertification, this is a great opportunity.
The class cannot be scheduled until St Mary's has confidence that they
will enroll at least 8 to the class.
If you are interested in this class, please respond to, Dale
Demarest-Bryan
at dale.demarest-bryan@cignabehavioral.com. before 4/21/2006.

Best Regards.
Dale

Posted by kenne064 at 2:12 PM

December 9, 2005

Classes

Spirituality and Resilience

Center for Spirituality and Healing
National Resilience Resource Center
University of Minnesota

CSpH 5201
Spring 2006

Two graduate or undergraduate credits offered jointly by the University of Minnesota College of Continuing Education and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

• Personal growth and reflection
• Professional development in health care, education, prevention and other helping services
• In-depth exploration of resilience theory and spirituality
• Specific applications of the Resilience/Health Realization model to students’ lives, professions and helping relationships.
• Scheduled so working professionals may attend

Objectives include literature critique, examination of personal resilience and protective factors, analysis of historical relationship of resilience and spirituality, experience and description of the principles of health realization, development of criteria and standards for assessing resilience in self and others, and synthesis of the understanding into professionally appropriate applications for each student’s situation. Students from last term report the class as “life-changing? and “meaningful.?

The concentrated small seminar schedule offers an “immersion experience? in this interesting and important topic. Various options for course reading materials accommodate different learning styles, personal interests and stimulate meaningful group dialogue.

For registration details contact the Center for Spirituality at 612-624-9459. For other questions please call the faculty person for this course: Kathy Marshall, National Resilience Resource Center, College of Continuing Education at 612-624-1693. (kmarshal@cce.umn.edu) Fees vary for graduate program or continuing education enrollment status. Traditional graded, as well as audited or “S/N? enrollment status options are available. See www.cce.umn.edu/nrrc and click on “Events? and scroll to CSPH 5201 course description.

Dates: Meets five Wednesdays 4:40-7:30 p.m.
(1/18, 2/1, 2/22, 3/22, 4/5) and two Saturdays
(1/21, 2/11) from 9a.m. to 4p.m. for a total
of seven sessions.

Posted by kenne064 at 3:01 PM

November 18, 2005

Classes

I am emailing you to let you know about two courses being offered this spring at the U of M through the Dance Department: INTRODUCTION TO DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (DNCE 3500 sec. 05) and BODY WORKS: INTRODUCTION TO SOMATIC STUDIES (DNCE 1500 sec. 50). With the growing attention to the use of alternative healing modalities in medicine and also for daily practice, these courses are of particular to anyone interested in the field of Complimentary and Alternative Therapies, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Creative Arts Therapy, Music Therapy, Social Work, Education, Dance or other healing modality. The course topics are also relevant to anyone interested in performance studies (music, dance or theater) or sports/sports medicine.

Please help me spread the word about these courses. If you have any questions or know anyone who might be interested in it, please feel free to contact me at 612-925-5277 or loebx001@umn.edu. If you have questions about registering please contact the U of M Dance Department at 612-624-5060. Thank you, Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb

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Introduction to Dance/Movement Therapy
Dnce 3500 - section 005, Topics in Dance; U of M Dance Department/Spring 2006
Wednesdays 2:05-3:35 - 2 Credits;To Register: contact the Registrars: 612-625-5333

Course Description:
This course is a basic introduction to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy. It will include 1) historic and theoretical perspectives on the use of movement and dance in relationship to psychology and healing; 2) an introduction to some of the major Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and techniques; and 3) a brief introduction to ways that Dance/Movement Therapy is used with various populations and in a variety of settings. The class is both experiential and didactic.

Objectives: The student will be able to:
Describe the field of Dance/Movement Therapy in relationship to related disciplines such as Dance and Psychology.
Identify and discuss the basic premises, theory and approaches of Dance/Movement Therapy.
Be familiar with selected Dance/Movement Therapy pioneers and their contribution to the field of Dance/Movement Therapy.
Understand the uses of Dance/Movement Therapy within a variety of settings and populations.
Be familiar with training process and requirements for Dance Movement Therapy certification.
Apply selected Dance/Movement Therapy techniques and approaches to their own experience

The class will be both experiential and academic and does not require any previous movement experience. The course is appropriate for those interested in Psychology, Education, Music Therapy, Social Work and Movement Studies. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277.

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Body Works: Introduction to Somatic Studies
DNCE 1500 sect. 50 (2 credits); Spring 2006 - Wednesdays 6:15-8:15 (1/17-5/5)

Somatic Studies is an emerging and growing field that examines the ways our bodies, minds, and emotions are interrelated and how those relationships are expressed in and changed through working with our body patterns. The various therapies in this field work with the body in order to promote change and healing. Somatic techniques are categorized as body manipulation and movement techniques within the field of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine.

In this course, the student will be introduced to the field of Somatic Studies and will experience a range of Eastern and Western approaches and techniques. Classes will use readings, discussion, experiential and group learning methods to facilitate the students understanding. The course fulfills a Dance Ethnology requirement and is appropriate for those interested in Kinesiology, Physical Therapy, Performance, Dance, Movement Studies, Sports, Sports Medicine and Complimentary and Alternative Medicine. For more information contact the Dance Department- 612-624-5060 or the instructor at 612-925-5277.

Specific goals include:
Introduction of history, basic concepts, theory and techniques of Somatic Studies
Introduction of specific Eastern and Western traditions
Exploration and development of personal Somatic Profile
Experience and meet practitioners of alternative techniques
Examination of differences between Eastern and Western body-based approaches


The instructor, Barbara Nordstrom-Loeb MFA, CMA, ADTR, is an advanced level Dance Movement Therapist/Psychotherapist and has worked in both hospitals and private practice. She is also a Certified Laban Movement Analyst; and a Body Therapist trained in a range of alternative modalities. She has taught courses in Dance, Womens Studies and Theater and has also been an Artist-in-Residence. She has taught at the University of Minnesota, St. Olaf College, Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, Portland State, Temple University, and the Lithuanian Arts University in Vilnius, Lithuania. . She currently teaches at the Center for Spirituality and Healing at the U of M and has a private practice as a Dance/Movement Therapist/Psychotherapist.

Posted by kenne064 at 3:13 PM

September 9, 2005

Classes

Dear CSPP students:

Richard Krueger is the "king" of focus group research. You might want to consider one of these course options below depending on your interests, your schedule, and your finances.

Pat

Focus Group Interviewing Courses
University of Minnesota
College of Education & Human Development
Educational Policy and Administration


Weekend Class in Rochester
EdPA 5524 Evaluation Colloquium -- Focus Group Interviewing
1 credit in Rochester
Friday 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm, Saturday 8:00 am 4:00 pm, Nov 11 12, 2005

This workshop provides participants with the opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct focus group interviews. Those attending will learn and practice techniques that result in successful focus groups. The workshop is an intensive (yet enjoyable) training opportunity conducted using lectures, small group discussions and case studies. Participants will learn about focus group interviewing and how it applies to their organizational environment. Attention is placed on using focus groups in organizations where rapid information is needed for decision-making.


Intensive Week-long Class on Twin Cities Campus
EdPA 5080 Special Topics: Conducting Focus Group Interviews
3 credits on St. Paul campus
Offered during winter break 2006
January 9 13 and March 25 8:00 am 4:00 pm

This workshop provides participants with an in-depth opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct focus group interviews. During the course the participants will learn about, discuss alternatives and then practice the array of skills needed in focus group research. Students will be expected to actually conduct a focus group study and report results at the final class session. Attention is placed on using focus groups in environments suitable for academic research, health, medical, educational, governmental and non-profit environments.

Instructor: Dr. Richard Krueger. Richard is a past president of the American Evaluation Association and is a Senior Fellow in the Evaluation Studies Unit of EdPA at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books on focus group interviewing and has consulted and taught focus group skills throughout the United States.

For more information contact: Richard Krueger at rkrueger@umn.edu


Evaluation Course Taught in Rochester 2005
University of Minnesota
College of Education & Human Development
Educational Policy and Administration


Richard Krueger will be teaching EdPA 5501 / EPsy 5243 over a series of 3 weekends this fall in Rochester. This course has offered on the Twin Cities campus for a number of years and has been popular with both graduates and undergraduates. The Rochester section will be similar to the campus course, but offered during a series of weekends. Students attending the Twin Cities campus are welcome to sign up for the Rochester class.

EdPA 5501/ EPsy 5243 (Section 003) Principles and Methods of Evaluation
3 credits in Rochester
Friday evening and Saturday --Sept 30 Oct 1, Oct 14-15, and Nov. 4-5
This is an introductory course in designing program evaluations. Topics include how to frame an evaluation study; how to examine a program's context; how to select appropriate methodology; and how to remain attentive to issues of diversity and multiple audiences. The course will also teach students survey and observation skills.

Instructor: Dr. Krueger is a past president of the American Evaluation Association and is a Senior Fellow in the Evaluation Studies Unit in EdPA at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of several books on focus group interviewing.

For more information contact

Richard Krueger at rkrueger@umn.edu
or
Joseph Marchesani, Program Director
Baccalaureate Degrees and Graduate Education Programs
University of Minnesota Rochester
joseph.marchesani@roch.edu 507-280-2819

Posted by kenne064 at 9:28 AM