October 31, 2005

Thomas F. Wallace Fellowship

The Thomas F. Wallace fellowship is one of the University's privately endowed fellowships. Application is open to graduate students in the humanities and social sciences who are in the intermediate years of their doctoral program. Applications are submitted to the graduate program; the program nominates one student to the Graduate School.

Our internal deadline is Wednesday, November 16. Our program defines intermediate years as the period between the completion of the written prelim requirement and before completion of the thesis prospectus; this is, generally, the third to fourth year of the doctoral program. Therefore, applications will be accepted from students who will have completed the written prelim requirement prior to the start of the fellowship (August 2006). The letter of recommendation from the advisor must state that he/she anticipates that the student will successfully complete the written prelim before August 2006.

Application information and forms are available at http://www.grad.umn.edu/fellowships/forms/stout_wallace.pdf

Posted by kwalter at 1:47 PM

October 28, 2005

The Center for Neurobehavioral Development would like to announce the two recipients of the 2005/2006 Predoctoral Fellowships:

Kristen Wiik of the Institute of Child Development
and
John Hoch of the Department of Educational Psychology

Both Kristen and John submitted excellent proposals and we congratulate them on their achievement. Kristen will focus her fellowship research on "the impact of early adversity and deprivation on children's social cognition and ability to cope with stress." John's research will analyze neurodevelopmental and behavioral variables in assessment and treatment of school-aged children with severe behavioral disorders. They will each present their fellowship research at the end of the year.

Congratulations John and Kristen!!

Posted by kwalter at 4:15 PM

LECTURE: THE ETHICAL BRAIN

The Lecture Series on Law, Health & the Life Sciences will present Prof. Michael Gazzaniga, PhD (Dartmouth College) on Wednesday, November 2, 2005 from 11:30am-1:00pm in the Mississippi Room at Coffman Memorial Union. Prof. Gazzaniga will lecture on "The Ethical Brain." Continuing education credit is offered (see below). The series is cosponsored by the University of Minnesota's Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment & the Life Sciences (www.lifesci.consortium.umn.edu) and Joint Degree Program in Law, Health & the Life Sciences (www.jointdegree.umn.edu).

Abstract: Cognitive neuroscience can either help or hinder how we should think about everyday ethical issues, such as whether an embryo has the moral status of a human being. However, there are important ethical areas that neuroscientists are being asked to weigh in on, when, in fact, they should not be. For instance, neuroscience has nothing to say about concepts such as free will and personal responsibility. And it probably also has nothing to say about anti-social thoughts. What cognitive neuroscience does do is suggest how brain research will instruct us on ideas such as universal morals possessed by all members of our species. This fundamental development will find cognitive neuroscience becoming central to the modern world's view of ethical universals.

Prof. Gazzaniga is the David T. McLaughlin Distinguished University Professor and Director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Dartmouth College. He is a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics. His work has advanced our understanding of functional lateralization in the brain and communication between the cerebral hemispheres. He has brought his work to a lay audience through his many books and his participation in several public television specials on brain function.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is required if you wish to receive continuing education credits (CLE or CME). RSVP to lawvalue@umn.edu or 612-625-0055. Coffman Union parking is available in the East River Road Garage on Delaware Street behind Coffman Union. Maps may be found at http://onestop.umn.edu/Maps/index.html.

This lecture is intended for students, faculty, researchers, scientists, policymakers, patients, health care professionals and organizations, and interested community. Following this lecture, participants should be able to:

-- Understand the neuroscientific findings that underlie moral and ethical behavior.

-- Explain how neuroscience contributes to our understanding of everyday ethical issues.

This lecture is the first in the 2005-06 Lecture Series on Law, Health & the Life Sciences. This year's Lecture Series focuses on the social implications of neuroscience. For more information on upcoming events, visit http://www.lifesci.consortium.umn.edu/news_and_events/#events.

Posted by kwalter at 4:13 PM

October 27, 2005

REGISTRATION REMINDERS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, is the last day to cancel Fall 05 registration without Graduate School approval.

Registration for Spring 2006 begins on Tuesday, November 8. Spring Semester begins on Tuesday, January 17. Be sure to register by Monday, January 16, in order to avoid paying a late fee. Remember: You have to register every semester, even if you are graduating in the first week of the semester.

-- If you don't register within the first two weeks of the semester, you will become inactive and have to reapply to the Graduate School. --

If you have a graduate assistantship OR are an international student, you must register full-time (6-14 credits).

If you are a doctoral student and have completed all course work, successfully passed your prelim oral, and registered for all thesis credits, you are eligible for full-time equivalent registration. See details at http://www.grad.umn.edu/Current_Students/registration/FTE_procedures.html Advanced masters students must apply for this status in advance.

• If you are taking your oral prelim by January 26, be sure to return the Prelim Oral Examination Report to the Graduate School (316 Johnston Hall) immediately following the exam so that you can change your registration to EPsy 8888 (thesis credits) for Spring 2006.

Registration in Grad 999 (no-cost/no-credit) will keep you active in the Graduate School only. This registration is NOT appropriate if you are required to register in order to hold an assistantship or fellowship, because of visa requirements, or if you are trying to defer student loans. Educational Psychology graduate students may only register for Grad 999 four semesters.

If you have registration questions, please contact Kathy Walter (624 16898 or kwalter@umn.edu).

Posted by kwalter at 1:38 PM

MORE IMPORTANT DATES

November 1: Deadline for Luce Scholars Program of Professional Apprenticeships in Asia. More information is available at http://www.grad.umn.edu/fellowships/research_abroad/luce.html

November 1: Deadline for Soros Fellowship. More information is available at http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/1753/soros

November 16: Internal application for Wallace Fellowship. More information is available at http://www.grad.umn.edu/fellowships/endowed/index.html

December 1: Applications due in Graduate School for Eva O. Miller and other endowed fellowships. More information is available at http://www.grad.umn.edu/fellowships/endowed/index.html

January 2: Deadline for Juran Fellowship (full application is due January 20)

February 3: Deadline for submitting a proposal for Ed Psych Graduate Student Research Day (Proposal forms will be sent to the Ed Psych Listserv)

March 10: Ed Psych Graduate Student Research Day, 1:00-3:30, Mississippi Room, Coffman Union

Posted by kwalter at 12:03 PM

October 13, 2005

JURAN FELLOWSHIP

The Joseph M. Juran Center for Leadership in Quality will annually select and honor as "Juran Fellows" Ph.D. students who, upon graduation are expected to contribute as new faculty members at leading institutions, fueling and broadening Quality thinking in their chosen field. Juran Fellows will be expected to conduct rigorous and important research on the topic of quality. The research should meet the highest standards of scholarship and be focused on important problems that impact society. The research must have significant implications for both scholars and practitioners.

The Juran philosophy and the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria are based on a number of concepts, including continual improvement, systems thinking, organizational learning, and prevention. These concepts are applicable to a broad variety of academic disciplines.

For more information, including application instructions and a list of past recipients, see http://carlsonschool.umn.edu/Page1289.aspx. Doctoral students must notify the Juran Center of their intention to apply for the fellowship award or doctoral award by January 2, 2006. A full application must be submitted by January 20.

Posted by kwalter at 10:18 AM

EDCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM

LIMITS ON LEARNING: SUCCESSFUL AND UNSUCCESSFUL UPDATING OF MEMORY

Presenter: Prof. David Rapp, Psychological Foundations

Wednesday, October 19
12:00 to 1:15
Room 120 Burton

Refreshments will be provided

Posted by kwalter at 9:52 AM

October 11, 2005

UPCOMING EVENTS

GUY STANTON FORD MEMORIAL LECTURE
Wednesday, October 12, Ted Mann Concert Hall
Beginning 10:15 a.m.

To commemorate the Graduate School's centennial, this year's Guy Stanton Ford Memorial Lecture will feature a portrayal of America's third president, Thomas Jefferson by Clay Jenkinson, humanities scholar and University of Minnesota graduate. Mr. Jefferson will hold a press conference following his lecture. The Ford Lecture will be presented at Ted Mann Concert Hall, West Bank Campus, at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, October 12. The lecture is free and open to the public, with seating available on a first-come first-served basis. Large commemorative posters are displayed around campus to publicize Mr. Jefferson's visit. For more information on the lecture, see http://www.grad.umn.edu/news/ford/index.html.

The Graduate School’s Centennial Symposium on Tuesday, October 18 (3:00 – 4:45 p.m., Coffman Memorial Union Theater), will focus on the Future of Graduate Education. The symposium will feature the following three key themes:

1) diversifying the American intellect by opening access to graduate education To underrepresented groups. Featured speaker Anthony Lising Antonio will share his views about the changes in institutional practice needed to advance this goal.

2) reimagining the scope, content, and purposes of the Ph.D., with an eye toward innovation in the design of doctoral education. Associate Dean of The Graduate School Shirley Nelson Garner will host a panel discussion with William Engeland, Ruth Karras, and Michael Nordquist, who have been at the forefront of these reforms.

3) identifying the changes in institutional policy and practice needed to foster interdisciplinary teaching, research, and training at the graduate level. As newly appointed Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, I will share findings from my recent work at the University of Washington on this subject, as a springboard for discussion about its relevance to seeding, supporting, and sustaining interdisciplinary initiatives at the University of Minnesota.

For more information and to RSVP, please go to http://www.grad.umn.edu/centennial/.

The Student Parent Association (new student group on campus) and the Student Parent HELP Center will be hosting a Student Parent Day on WEdnesday, October 19, 2005 from Noon to 2:30 PM, on Northrop Plaza in front of Morrill Hall.

The purpose of this event is to increase the visibility for U of MN students with children. All student parents undergrad or graduate, their children, friends and staff/faculty supporters are welcome to attend this first of it's kind campus event. In addition to several speakers and presenters that will begin the program at Noon we are also excited to host a group of 40 teen parents from AGAPE Alternative High School. These teen students will be queried in advance regarding their future major and career interests, and then matched with volunteer student parentmentors from the U of MN who are currently in those selected majors or fields. The AGAPE teen parents and our own U of MN STudent Parents will then enjoy a pizza luncheon together from 1 to 2:30, giving them time to discuss college life, amjor interests and career plans. This event is sponsored by a U of MN Coca Cola Grant that SPA received. All U of MN student parents and their supporters are welcome to attend this event.

Posted by kwalter at 2:55 PM

FORD FOUNDATION DIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS

Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships for Achieving Excellence in College and University Teaching are designed to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students. Predoctoral fellowships support study toward a Ph.D. or Sc.D.; Dissertation fellowships offer support in the final year of writing the Ph.D. or Sc.D. thesis; Postdoctoral Fellowships offer one-year awards for Ph.D. recipients. Applicants must be U.S. citizens in research-based fields of study.

Additional information is available at http://www7.nationalacademies.org/fellowships/

Posted by kwalter at 2:46 PM

GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH DAY

The 6th Annual Graduate Student Research Day will be held on Friday, March 10th from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. in the Mississippi Room of Coffman Memorial Union. Mark your calendars now!

The Department instituted the Grad Student Research Day in 2001 in recognition of the abilities and talents of its students. This annual event has been designed with three purposes:

-- to provide a format for graduate students to present their research and be recognized locally by peers and faculty
-- to provide students an opportunity for professional development and practice for future state or national conferences, and
-- to promote a department-wide activity that brings faculty and graduate students together around a common goal—disciplined inquiry.

Please talk to your advisor and decide if you’d like to do a paper or poster presentation. The deadline for submitting a proposal is Friday, February 3. Watch for email updates about the process for submitting proposals and other details.

Posted by kwalter at 9:33 AM

October 6, 2005

ED PSYCH CORE COURSE REQUIREMENT

We recently found an error in the description of the Statistics, Measurement, Evaluation core requirement for doctoral students in the Ed Psych Grad Student Handbook. The correct requirement is as follows:

Ph.D.: 12 semester cr in statistics, measurement, or evaluation (6 credits must be in statistics at the 8xxx level, 3 must be in measurement area) (10 sem cr in statistics and measurement for those entering prior to fall 2003)

The Handbook (http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPsych/handbook/2005-06/planning.html) has been corrected.

Posted by kwalter at 8:15 AM

October 3, 2005

NSEP REPRESENTATIVE ON CAMPUS

Liz Veatch, director for the NSEP David L. Boren Graduate Fellowship, will be visiting the Twin Cities campus on Oct. 12, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. (other times by appointment), 110 Heller Hall, West Bank, to meet with students to discuss fellowship opportunities. The National Security Education Program (NSEP) is a unique U.S. government-sponsored fellowship opportunity for U.S. graduate students to enhance their understanding of countries whose languages and cultures are less frequently studied. The maximum award for overseas study is $12,000 per semester for up to two semesters. A maximum of $12,000 is available for a program of domestic study only. The maximum level of support for a combined overseas and domestic program is $30,000. Application deadline is January 30, 2006. For more information contact, Meaka Henningsen, Office of International Programs, meaka@umn.edu or http://nsep.aed.org/

Posted by kwalter at 2:59 PM

Ed Psych CORE COURES

The Graduate Advisory Committee approved the following changes to the Ed Psych core requirements at their September meeting:

EPsy 5141 (Aggression in the Schools) may now be taken to meet the Social Psychology core requirement.

EPsy 8247 (Advanced Interviewing and NVIVO) may be taken by PhD students to meet the evaluation option in the Statistics, Measurement, Evaluation requirement.

CORRECTION:

EPsy 5244 (Survey Design, Sampling and Implementation) and 5247 (Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology) fall under the evaluation option for PhD students in the Statistics, Measurement, Evalution Requirement. These courses will not be accepted to meet the research methods requirement without a petition.

The Ed Psych Grad Student Handbook (http://www.education.umn.edu/EdPsych/handbook/default.html) will be updated soon to reflect these changes.


Posted by kwalter at 11:02 AM

RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS

National Depression Screening Day
Thursday, October 6
Minneapolis campus screening – 302 Eddy Hall, 10:00-2:30
St. Paul campus screening – 199 Coffey Hall, 11:00-1:00

Other mental health resources on campus include:

Students can access mental health services at: Boynton Health Service if they have paid the Student Services Fee (http://www.bhs.umn.edu/services/mentalhealth.htm), and University Counseling and onsulting Services (http://www.ucs.umn.edu/).

Disability Services (http://ds.umn.edu) provides assistance with academic accommodations for students with diagnosed, severe, and persistent mental health conditions. Consultation and problem-solving regarding disability issues is available for faculty, staff, and supervisors.

The "Understanding Today's Student" (http://www.osa.umn.edu/resources/index.html) website contains a list of resources for faculty and staff which provide advice for faculty and staff who encounter students who may be experiencing a variety of mental health challenges, including depression.

The "Assisting Distressed Students" (http://www.ucs.umn.edu/help/) website provides advice for assisting students who are experiencing distress due to a variety of issues.

The Center for Teaching and Learning (http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/teachlearn/) provides a number of workshops and programs which are designed to help teaching assistants and faculty to deal with a variety of classroom situations, including those related to students who may have a mental illness or disability.

Posted by kwalter at 10:54 AM

CONGRATULATIONS!

Ockjean Kim, a recent graduate in Special Ed, received a dissertation award from CEC Teacher Education Division. Ockjean is currently on the faculty at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Congratulations to Ockjean!

Posted by kwalter at 10:43 AM

ISSS CAREER WORKSHOPS

International Student and Scholar Services is offering Career Workshops Fall 05 for international students, beginning this coming Tuesday (October 4). The sessions provide practical information and materials on how to find a job, how to write a resume and cover letter, how to prepare for a job interview, academic job search and visa options after graduation Detailed information can be found at http://www.isss.umn.edu/career/workshops.html

Posted by kwalter at 10:22 AM

GRAD SCHOOL CENTENNIAL SYMPOSIUM

The Graduate School’s Centennial Symposium will be held on Tuesday, October 18 (3:00 – 4:45 p.m., Coffman Memorial Union Theater) and will focus on the Future of Graduate Education. The symposium will feature the following three key themes:

1) diversifying the American intellect by opening access to graduate education to underrepresented groups. Featured speaker Anthony Lising Antonio will share his views about the changes in institutional practice needed to advance this goal.

2) reimagining the scope, content, and purposes of the Ph.D., with an eye toward innovation in the design of doctoral education. Associate Dean of The Graduate School Shirley Nelson Garner will host a panel discussion with William Engeland, Ruth Karras, and Michael Nordquist, who have been at the forefront of these reforms.

3) identifying the changes in institutional policy and practice needed to foster interdisciplinary teaching, research, and training at the graduate level. As newly appointed Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, I will share findings from my recent work at the University of Washington on this subject, as a springboard for discussion about its relevance to seeding, supporting, and sustaining interdisciplinary initiatives at the University of Minnesota.

For more information and to RSVP, please go to http://www.grad.umn.edu/centennial.

Posted by kwalter at 10:20 AM

UPCOMING EVENTS

TODAY!

Join us for free pizza and talk on:
Maoist Insurgency and Education in Nepal: The Plight of School Children
Presented by Bhaskar Upadhyay, Curriculum and Instruction

When: Monday, October 3, 2005, Noon - 1:30
Where: 250 Wulling Hall, East Bank, Minneapolis Campus
Free and open to all.

National Depression Screening Day
Thursday, October 6
Minneapolis campus screening – 302 Eddy Hall, 10:00-2:30
St. Paul campus screening – 199 Coffey Hall, 11:00-1:00

University Counseling & Consulting Services, 624 3233


SMALL WORLD COFFEE HOUR IS BACK OCTOBER 7!!!

Feeling Lonely? Do you want to reconnect with old friends? Do you want to make new friends?
Come join us at the Small World Coffee Hour (SWCH). This FREE Program provides an opportunity for Internationals and US Americans to socialize with those of similar interests in a casual environment. This week we will celebrate Columbus Day together. Come and ...discover America with us! We will have interesting information about the life and journeys of Christopher Columbus, a small window on Native American history and culture, and an exciting drawing contest (with prizes!). As always, we will also have great snacks, crafts, games, freshly brewed hot coffee, flavorful tea, world music, and a relaxed environment where you can meet old friends, make new ones, or simply "network." Come alone or bring your friends. Hope to see you there!

WHEN: FRIDAY, October 7, 2005
TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
WHERE: 110 Heller Hall, Minneapolis, West Bank Campus
COST: FREE!!!

Sponsored by International Student and Scholar Services

This event is sponsored by the International Education Committee for the College of Education and Human Development.

Posted by kwalter at 10:14 AM