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Analysis on records/CAR

Analysis on records/CAR

By Brittany Falkers

 

            An example of an article that makes effective use of records and computer assisted reporting is "Web maps localize Iowa air pollution" by Chris Hamby.

            Des Moines Register reporters Chase Davis and Perry Beeman spent months compiling and making sense of data for a series on air pollution in Iowa, according to Hamby.

            There were more than 1,600 facilities across the state, they employed a data editor James Wilkerson and digital projects editor Michael Corey to help make effective web mapping for they story.  

            In using computer assisted reporting programs to show mapping of pollution in Iowa, the reporters could create a story that was easier for the reader to understand.  The use visual reporting and multimedia made for an easier interpretation of the story by the readers.

            The reporters for this story employed the help of data editors and digital project editors, meaning, it took training and sophistication to compile and organize the data into maps.  

Analysis on Diversity

Analysis on Diversity

By Brittany Falkers

 

            The film "Precious" has recently entered a cultural conversation. In an article, from the New York Times, the issues of the films racial stereotypes are discussed.

The article provided several scholarly and academic professionals' opinions and interpretations of the film.

"It [the article] had a lot of different views of the movie." Lauren, an orthodontic assistant familiar with racial stereotypes said.  She preferred not to use her last name in the interview.   

The article discussed the film's main character called Precious, an obese, poor, illiterate, young black woman who is sexually and emotionally abused, as the motion pictures stereotypical resort to depicting black people in film. 

The article gave several view points from those who view the character as another realm of black culture that should be recognized.   

Lauren, 21, spoke about the article as an interesting cultural look at a new film. 

The article took varying ideas of stereotypes.  It moved beyond looking at black people as stereotypes and focused on how they felt about those stereotypes, Lauren said.

The article starts as a review of the film, but then quickly turns to its newsworthiness, the issue of African American stereotypes.    

Analysis on number use

Analysis on number use

By Brittany Falkers

 

            The news story I found from the New York Times uses numbers to represent financial figures, determine time differences for a financial status, and it also uses numbers to reveal stock changes.  

This reporter used numbers to tell the story because the numbers were crucial to the facts.  Almost every time a financial figure is mentioned in the story, the reporter uses more numbers to put those figures into a time frame.  

            In one graph of the story the number use becomes a bit overwhelming.  This is due to a rapid fire of figures that seem to topple over one another.  The reporter could have made lessened this confusion a bit by spreading the figures out over more paragraphs and giving the numbers and figures used more background and context. 

            The source of these numbers comes from the National Venture Capital Association as well as interviewee sources that have provided the reporter with statistics and facts.  

News analysis on obits

News analysis on obits

By Brittany Falkers

 

            The obituariy found is for Stacy Rowles, a jazz musician who died at the age of 54.  Her obit was found in the New York Times.  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/07/arts/music/07rowles.html?ref=obituaries

            This obituary's lead begins with the standard New York Times formula.  "Stacy Rowles, a jazz trumpeter, flugelhorn player and singer who had been active on the Los Angeles jazz scene since the 1980s, died on Oct. 27 at her home in Burbank, Calif.  She was 54." Her obituary said.

            This is the formulaic standard for a New York Times obituary, and it works very well in this obit.  

            The obituary did not use any outside sources for quotes or information, but rather used her songs and past history to give the story a voice.  This worked well because the reporter could use her life through music to give a sense of her life.

            Rowles obituary differs from a standard resume because it doesn't list facts from her life, rather some accomplishments as well as highlights from her life as a jazz musician.  The article chooses to focus on one of her achievements rather than all of them in a list form.  

 

 

            http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/07/arts/music/07rowles.html?ref=obituaries

Analysis on Speeches/Meetings

Analysis on Speeches/Meetings

By Brittany Falkers

 

            For this analysis I chose to write about a speech that Gov. Tim Pawlenty made on Oct. 13 at the annual dinner of the Minnesota Business Partnership.

            The article, "Pawlenty warns of U.S. becoming the next GM" gave more than exactly what the press release gave; the article was almost a direct transcript of the speech.

            It was very interesting to see this style of reporting on a speech because it goes against many of the speech story writing guidelines discussed in class.  However this model reinforces why you can't include everything. 

            The first few grafts gave an overview, or summary, of the speech highlighting the where and when to but it into context.

            After the intro and summary to the story it seemed to turn into a transcript somehow.  This made me realize why one shouldn't put everything in a speech in a story about the speech.  I was bored by the next page.

            If a person is reading a story about a speech, it is most likely because they didn't want to see or actually read the speech themselves.

            When writing a story on a speech, it is important, I realize, to write the summary of main points and themes of the speech given.

 

 http://www.startribune.com/opinion/65843407.html?page=3&c=y 

Multimedia Analysis

Multimedia Analysis

By Brittany Falkers

 

            One of the multimedia options I found was from The New York Times, it was an audio slideshow on a story about a priest who secretly fathered and abandoned his son. 

            This audio slideshow was added a voice and audio clues to the story.  In the slideshow, listeners/readers can hear the interviewee's voice, including tone and inflection witch give a human-interest aspect to the story. 

            Each of the slides that went along with the audio interview/overview of the story had captions to accompany the pictures.  These were short descriptive captions explaining the action in the photo. 

            The other multimedia option I observed was at StarTribune.com, a video clip from a story about a six-year-old boy whose parents believed he was trapped in a homemade balloon.

            The video was a short clip of what seems to be a sort of news conference with the family and several reporters. 

            This clip added yet another human and face element to the story.  The interviews with the father and son gave visual and audio clues to the story. 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/10/15/us/priest/index.html?th&emc=th#

 

http://video.ap.org/?f=MNMIT&pid=ILurm8dEc0yHi_fhsrwrgDomsciNB4qI

Analysis on Spot and Follows

Analysis on Spot and Follows

By Brittany Falkers

 

            I choose to follow a story about the two-way conversion of Hennepin and 1st Avenues in downtown Minneapolis, from a day prior when the announcement was made in the Star Tribune of the arrival of road construction. 

The story was updated on Saturday about the delays and implications concerned with the weather and traffic woes. 

            The stories differed in details as well as interview input.  The first story was more about the excitement of the transition to two-ways, and preparing for the road work and confusion it would bring.

  The second story is a sort of update.  It is pretty much just a briefing of what has happened now that the road work has begun.  The main story is quickly given in both, if not more in the updated version.           

            There is no response to a report from a competing news organization in the second-day story. 

            This second-day story isn't as much of an add-on to the first-day story; rather, it is a follow up to what the first-day story was about.  It continues the implications of the road construction.

 

http://www.startribune.com/local/63935422.html?elr=KArks:DCiUBDia_nDaycUiacyKU7DYaGEP7vDEh7P:DiUs

Structure Analysis

Structure Analysis

By Brittany Falkers

 

            I reviewed a story on StarTribune.com, "2 teens arrested in Princeton suspicious packages case" by Paul Walsh.  This story used the inverted pyramid model fro news structure.  The most important news was at the beginning of the story; Who, What and Where.  The suspects' names and what they are suspected of as well as where.  As the story continued less impacting facts came into play, more of the why and how of the story.

             The information summarized the important events giving the basic information needed, who and what they did.  Then in the later part of the story quotes from police reports as well as community and school information for the Princeton area. 

            The reporter ordered the information from most important information at the top and then going down to less impacting or action details at the end.  This model works well for this story because if I were in a rush and unable to read the whole story, I could get all the gist of the story within the first two paragraphs. 

 

http://www.startribune.com/local/63262307.html?elr=KArksUUUoDEy3LGDiO7aiU

2 teens arrested in Princeton suspicious packages case

By Paul Walsh, Star Tribune

Attribution Analysis

Attribution Analysis

By Brittany Falkers

            In this analysis I looked at and article written by Helene Cooper, "Obama Makes Gains at U.N. on Iran and Proliferation.  

            I choose this article in particular because of the way it addresses President Barak Obama.  In the beginning of the article Obama is referred to as President Obama.  However, in the next paragraph he is referred to as Mr. Obama.  This was confusing and made the story smear to an almost distracting, "Mr.", dilemma.

            Another President was referred to in this article as well, in first introduction as President Demitri A. Medvedev of Russia, and then in the following as Mr. Medvedev.  

            Other attributions I thought were successful and effective in this article.  It used people of prominence and authority to give the story credibility with quotes.  

            The majority of the information is from people in this article. 

            The attributions are scattered throughout the story, however they are more concentrated toward the end of the story.

            In the story the reporter uses a summary before a quote or a type of lead in to what the quote is saying.  I think that this is a very effective way to use attribution to one's advantage.

Analysis on Leads

Analysis on Leads

By Brittany Falkers

 

            An example of an effective lead comes from the StarTribune.com.  Staff reporter Vince Tuss wrote an article, "Officer at center of Fong Lee shooting" the lead is as follows:

"A Minneapolis police officer at the center of controversy after fatally shooting 19-year-old Fong Lee in 2006 has been fired, a department spokesman said Wednesday."

The lead is effective because it gets right to the action of the story.  In the article Tuss gives other important details describing the why and how aspect of the story.  In his lead, however, he uses the who, what, and when details well. 

The lead is effective because of proximity value as well as a sort of impact value. Proximity is seen from the "where" of the lead, Minneapolis.  The impact is seen from the 'who' part of the lead, a police officer.  A corrupt officer has the potential for great impact on citizens.

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