Persuasion Techniques and Management

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The foot-in-the-door technique, the door-in-the-face technique, and the low-ball technique are all marketing persuasion techniques with psychological implications. The foot-in-the-door technique involves making a small request before making a bigger one. There are several examples of companies and organizations that use this technique. Often, organizations go door to door to get small contributions, and then ask for progressively more significant contributions. My high school, for example, is a private high school that asked my graduating class for contributions to a scholarship fund. I contributed, and now I receive frequent emails asking for more and more contributions. This video, directed by Nick Cooney, author of Change of Heart: What Psychology Can Teach Us About Spreading Social Change, gives examples of how marketers use the foot-in-the-door technique as a standard business strategy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlJYB7V1RpA).
The next marketing strategy, the door-in-the-face strategy, involves making an unreasonably large request before making the small request we're hoping to have granted, according to our Lilienfeld text. Charities are known for executing this technique. For example, if one is persuaded by a charity's representative to donate a large sum of money, say one hundred dollars, the charity can then follow up on the person to ask for a smaller amount of money, which will generally keep the donator since they psychologically feel that they can donate smaller amounts of money instead of their initial large amount.
The third marketing technique is the low-ball technique in which the seller of a product starts by quoting a low sales price, and then mentions all of the add-on costs once the customer has agreed to purchase the product. A common culprit of this technique is a car dealership. Even though it is expected, car salespersons often have a base price for a car then once the buyer agrees on the price, the unknown fees are added onto that base price. Thus, it is best for the buyer to have their own haggling technique to make the base price as low as possible.
Because I would like to go into the marketing field of business, having basic knowledge of the human mind and how they psychologically make decisions is important for my success. Mastering these three techniques will help me understand how people make decisions and how I can best market products.

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This page contains a single entry by beni0097 published on December 4, 2011 8:28 PM.

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