Recently in South Asia Events Category

Imperial Nature: Flora, Fauna, and Colonialism in India

January 18 - April 20, 2014

Cargill Gallery
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
2400 Third Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404

Free Admission

Two different approaches to understanding and depicting nature melded--with beguiling results--as the long interlacing of British and Indian cultures on the subcontinent deepened in the 17th and 18th centuries, an uneasy period of intensifying colonial rule. This exhibition showcases these unique representations of nature, commissioned by Indian princes and increasingly powerful European colonial patrons--an artistic and scientific confluence that forever reshaped the way we view the natural world.

The exhibition examines a wide variety of works commissioned by Indian princes and European elites, featuring works from two important New York collections and 11 never-before-exhibited "Lady Impey" paintings from the private collection of Elizabeth and Willard Clark. Lady Mary Impey, a British colonial in 18th century Calcutta, commissioned Indian painters to illustrate birds from her private menagerie, resulting in images that owe as much to European natural science as India's rich painterly tradition.

Social Exclusion and the Problem of Dalits in India
Sukhadeo Thorat
Chairman, Indian Council of Social Research

Date: October 30, 2013
Time: 11:30am to 1pm
Place: Room 25, University of Minnesota Law School

There is a broad empirical and theoretical literature attempting to explain the causes and consequences of social exclusion. An emerging body of policy research questions the effectiveness of efforts, such as affirmative action or reservations, designed to reduce inequality and improve the economic and social well-being of socially excluded groups. In the Indian context, this debate revolves around the caste system and the designation of "untouchables" or Dalits. Professor Thorat will discuss the theory and empirical realities of excluded groups and offer new insights about public policies designed to remedy social exclusion and over-inclusion.

Dr. Sukhadeo Thorat is the Chair of the Indian Council of Social Science Research and former Director of the Indian Institute of Dalit Studies. Dr. Thorat has dedicated his life to the cause of Dalits, tribes and minorities in India and his research on the economic discrimination of minority groups has influenced local and international policy makers. His work has received international acclaim including the Mother Teresa International Award, for outstanding achievement and contribution to Minority, Weaker Sections and towards the people of our nation by All India Minority and Weaker Section Council, Kolkata.

Dr. Thorat received a doctorate in economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University, a master's degree in economics from Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University and a diploma in economic planning from Main School of Planning, Warsaw Poland.

Register for this event at
https://sthorat.eventbrite.com/

Website: http://hhh.umn.edu/centers/rwc/social_exclusion.html

See the South Asia Scholarly Events Calendar

Three South Asia Events next week - October 15th and 16th

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When it rains, it pours. Next Tuesday and Wednesday there are three South Asia events. Keep track with the South Asia Events Calendar


Three South Asia Events
October 15th and 16th


Tuesday October 15th

Katherine Boo Discusses Behind the Beautiful Forevers

7:30pm-9:00pm
Theater Coffman Memorial Union

Esther Freier Lecturer in Literature Katherine Boo will discuss her book Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity (Random House), which won the 2012 National Book Award for nonfiction. A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Boo spent three years researching in the Annawadi slum, outside Mumbai's International Airport. She found residents trying to raise families and move past a survival existence to some more secure place: her book recounts their struggles with rich characterizations and vivid detail. "Comparison to Dickens is not unwarranted," according to The New York Times' Janet Maslin. Presented by the Department of English and the Esther Freier Lectures in Literature.

Free and open to the public. A book signing and reception will follow the talk. Copies of Boo's book will be available for purchase.


Wednesday October 16th

Nasser Hussain Lecture on "Colonial War and Modernity"

4:00pm-5:30pm
710 Social Sciences, 267 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis

The term colonial war, in fact, entails some of the signal strategies of modern conflict and violence: racialized surveillance, winning hearts and minds, strategic aerial bombing. In the colonies there existed no clear demarcations between wartime and peacetime and between the control of populations and the destruction of enemies. This lecture will begin to explicate these themes by looking at the space of the camp and early programs of "humanitarian" air war.

Nasser Hussain is Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought at Amherst College

First of the South Asia Lecture Series for Fall 2013


Wednesday October 16th

Event with Indian Food Movement Leader Sheelu Francis

7:00pm-8:30pm
Bell Museum of Natural History, 10 Church St SE Minneapolis

The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and the Bell Museum of Natural History invite you to a World Food Day event featuring Sheelu Francis of the Tamil Nadu Women's Collective, honoree at the 2013 Food Sovereignty Prize.

The Tamil Nadu Women's Collective in southern India has organized over 100,000 marginalized women, many in unofficial worker unions or small collective farms, to strengthen their food sovereignty and thus their broader power. In addition to organizing locally and nationally on issues from their own families' food security to land rights to opposition to genetically modified seeds, the collective he encourages cultivation of native millet varieties--the hardy traditional grain is nutritious, drought-resistant and easier to grow in the region than wheat or rice. Our guest, Sheelu Francis, is the president of the collective and will be honored at the Food Sovereignty award ceremony on behalf of the collective in New York on October 15, 2013.

The United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) created World Food Day in 1979 to bring attention to the profound issues of hunger and malnutrition in the world. As the conditions that fuel hunger intensify, it is more vital than ever to find creative and constructive ways to engage people everywhere on the challenges of feeding and nourishing a world population of 7 billion in ways that are fair, sustainable, healthy and environmentally sound.

Event supported by IATP, the Bell Museum of Natural History, India Association of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota's Institute for Global Studies to celebrate World Food Day.

South Asia Lecture Series for Fall 2013

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Announcing the Fall 2013 South Asia Lecture Series

All lectures are 4:00-5:30 p.m. in Room 710 Social Sciences

Wednesday, October 16th
"Colonial War and Modernity"
Nasser Hussain,
Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, Amherst College

Wednesday, October 23rd
"Gandhi's Realism: Means and Ends in Politics"
Karuna Mantena,
Political Science, Yale University

Wednesday, October 30th
"Extimate Accomplices: Alice Fletcher, W.E.B. DuBois, Franz Boas and the Emergence of Cultural Relativism"
Qadri Ismail,
English, University of Minnesota

Wednesday, November 6th
"Ciphering the Satyagrahi: Gandhi, the Principle, and the Vow"
Ajay Skaria,
History, University of Minnesota


See the poster for this series

See the South Asia Scholarly Events Calendar

Katherine Boo Discusses

Behind the Beautiful Forevers:
Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

Date: 10/15/2013
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location: Theater Coffman Memorial Union
Cost: Free

Description:

Esther Freier Lecturer in Literature Katherine Boo will discuss her book Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity (Random House), which won the 2012 National Book Award for nonfiction. A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Boo spent three years researching in the Annawadi slum, outside Mumbai's International Airport. She found residents trying to raise families and move past a survival existence to some more secure place: her book recounts their struggles with rich characterizations and vivid detail. "Comparison to Dickens is not unwarranted," according to The New York Times' Janet Maslin. Presented by the Department of English and the Esther Freier Lectures in Literature.

Free and open to the public. A book signing and reception will follow the talk. Copies of Boo's book will be available for purchase.

See the South Asia Scholarly Events Calendar

Math in China, India, and the West
Can We Compare Their Achievements Objectively?

lecture by David Mumford
Brown University

Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Time: 7:00 pm
Place: 175 Willey Hall

From Victorian England until quite recently, it was accepted that math began in Greece, then languished until the Renaissance when it took off in Europe. Now with "political correctness" and chauvinism in the reborn great powers of the East, the pendulum has swung and some claim that the key ideas originated in the East and migrated to the West. To make a balanced and scholarly assessment is not easy. First, one must look equally at both applied and pure math and at the role of rigor versus other forms of argument across cultures. During his lecture, Mumford will present a series of vignettes of actual math from Babylon, Vedic India, Han China, Baghdad, and Kerala (India) to illustrate how rich the full picture is and how the idiosyncrasies of each culture profoundly altered the math they developed. His lecture will also cover what was unique to the math of ancient Greek culture, and why, finally, math exploded in 17th century Europe.

Event: The Sugar in the Milk Trilogy

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The Sugar in the Milk Trilogy is a series of three solo shows created by Zaraawar Mistry from 2002 to 2012.

Date & Time: Fri-Sat, Feb 1-2, Mar 1-2 and Apr 5-6 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets: $15-$30 for each play in the trilogy.
You can select the amount you would like to pay.
Purchase Online or call 1-800-838-3006.


Sohrab and Rustum

Fri-Sat, Feb 1-2 at 7:30 p.m.

Indian Cowboy

Fri-Sat, Mar 1-2 at 7:30 p.m.

The Other Mr. Gandhi

Fri-Sat, Apr 5-6 at 7:30 p.m.

The plays all have different characters and story lines, but have similar themes. From Feb-Apr, 2013 the three plays are being presented together for the first time. You can see one or see them all.

About the title of the Trilogy:
Listen to Zaraawar's telling of The Sugar in the Milk story, from his collection of Children's Stories from India.

Musicking Bodies: Gesture and Voice in Hindustani Music

Matt Rahaim reads from his new book


Date: 11/29/2012
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: U of M Bookstore Coffman Memorial Union
Cost: Free

Description:
Matthew Rahaim, local author and University of Minnesota professor, will discuss his book Musicking Bodies: Gesture and Voice in Hindustani Music on Thursday, November 29 at 4:00 p.m. at the University of Minnesota Bookstore in Coffman Memorial Union, 300 Washington Ave. S.E. Minneapolis.

Indian classical music is performed with extensive physical motions and gestures that are both disciplined and spontaneous; singers implicitly theorize melody as motion, construct melodic objects, and transmit musical traditions. These gestures embody a special kind of melodic knowledge that results in lineages of vocalists who not only sound similar, but also engage with music kinesthetically according to similar aesthetic and ethical ideals. Musicking Bodies investigates the ways in which hand gestures are used to manifest melody and transmit culture, and is an important contribution to the field of ethnomusicology.

Rahaim will sign copies of his book following the discussion. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information: https://events.umn.edu/023877

Click here to add to your UMN Google Calendar

India in the Age of Inequality:
Farm crisis, food crisis & the media
by P. Sainath

Date: 11/15/2012
Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: 1210 Heller Hall
Series: ICGC Distinguished Public Lecture


While India has caught the attention of the world with it's growth rates and generation of wealth these past two decades, a much less-told side of the story remains: levels of inequality are higher than at any time since the days of the British Raj. The problems of hunger and deprivation are sharp and alarming. Distress migrations out of the countryside have risen dramatically. And the country is still to come out of its worst agrarian crisis since the event of the Green revolution. A lot of these problems and crises are driven not by natural calamity, but by policies that favor a very small segment of the population.

P. Sainath is Rural Affairs Editor, The Hindu and the McGraw Professor in Writing at Princeton University. In addition, he wrote the book, Everybody loves a good drought: stories from India's poorest districts.

Screening of Jai Bhim Comrade by Anand Patwardhan

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Screening of Jai Bhim Comrade
by Anand Patwardhan,
Visiting Humphrey Professor
Macalester College


Date: Monday, November 12, 2012
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the campus center at Macalester College
Open to the public.

Synopsis: For thousands of years India's Dalits were abhorred as "untouchables" denied education and treated as bonded labour. By 1923 Bhimrao Ambedkar broke the taboo, won doctorates abroad and fought for the emancipation of his people. He drafted India's Constitution, led his followers to discard Hinduism for Buddhism. His legend still spreads through poetry and song. In 1997 a statue of Dr. Ambedkar in a Dalit colony in Mumbai was desecrated with footwear. As angry residents gathered, police opened fire killing 10. Vilas Ghogre, a leftist poet, hung himself in protest. 'Jai Bhim Comrade' shot over 14 years, follows the poetry and music of people like Vilas and marks a subaltern tradition of reason that from the days of the Buddha, has fought superstition and religious bigotry.

Review: http://kafila.org/2012/03/21/jai-bhim-comrade-patwardhan/

n.b.: The U of MN has a copy of the DVD in the Walter Library Smart Commons video collection. It and it circulates for 3 days and can be reserved for classroom use.

Talk by Richa Nagar, November 2

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"Storytelling and Co-authorship in Feminist Alliance Work:
Reflections From a Journey"

Talk by Richa Nagar
Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
University of Minnesota

Date: 11/02/2012
Time: 1:00 - 2:15 PM
Location: 400 Ford Hall

If all writing is fundamentally tied to the production of meanings and
texts, then feminist research that blurs the borders of academia and
activism is necessarily about the labor and politics of mobilizing
experience for particular ends. Co-authoring stories is a chief tool
by which feminists working in alliances across borders mobilize
experience to write against relations of power that produce social
violence, and to imagine and enact their own visions and ethics of
social change. Such work demands a serious engagement with the
complexities of identity, representation, and political imagination as
well as a rethinking of the assumptions and possibilities associated
with engagement and expertise. This presentation draws upon 16 years
of partnership with activists in India and with academic co-authors in
the US to reflect on how story telling across social, geographical,
and institutional borders can enhance critical engagement with
questions of violence and struggles for social change, while also
troubling dominant discourses and methodologies inside and outside of
the academy. In offering six "truths" of alliance work, this talk
reflects on the labor process, assumptions, possibilities, and risks
associated with co-authorship as a tool for mobilizing intellectual
spaces in which stories from multiple locations in an alliance can
speak with one another and evolve into more nuanced critical
interventions.

Richa Nagar is Professor of Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies at
the University of Minnesota and she has worked closely with Sangtin
Kisaan Mazdoor Sangathan (Sangtin Peasants and Workers Organization)
in Sitapur District of India. She has co-authored Sangtin Yatra
(Sangtin, 2004), Playing with Fire (University of Minnesota Press and
Zubaan, 2006), A World of Difference (Guilford, 2009), and Ek Aur
Neemsaar (Rajkamal Prakashan, 2012) and she has co-edited Critical
Transnational Feminist Studies (SUNY Press, 2010). She has been a
residential fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the
Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) in Stanford and at the Jawaharlal Nehru
Institute for Advanced Studies in New Delhi.

Event URL: https://events.umn.edu/021316

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the American Institute of Indian Studies, we invite you to join us on December 21-22, 2012 in Delhi to discuss The Long 1980s: Recovering a 'Lost Decade.'

Book-ended by the dramatic historical markers of the Emergency on the one hand and economic liberalization and the Mandal and Masjid controversies on the other, the period that we consciously choose to delineate here as "the long 1980s" is typically dismissed as an era of economic stagnation and political authoritarianism. And yet, in many ways, the 1980s was a period of extraordinary importance. In areas as distinct as the visual arts, classical and popular music, cultural patronage, the writing of national histories, and print and audio-visual media, the 1980s was an era of consolidation and productive re-alignment. Furthermore, these years witnessed a critical deepening of scholarship in the interpretive sciences on these realms both in the Indian academy and around the world. Propelled by this realization, we seek to bring together scholars from across the humanities and social sciences to pursue three interlocking projects: (1) to identify what we are calling the long 1980s as a pivotal turning point in India's twentieth-century history; (2) to take stock of the scholarship on the areas we have identified as historically constitutive of that period; and (3) to connect studies of cultural production with those of political practice and political economy.

The first of three conferences, "The Long 1980s: Recovering a 'Lost Decade'" is being organized by Sumathi Ramaswamy of Duke University, Karin Zitzewitz of Michigan State University, Rebecca Brown at Johns Hopkins University and Arvind Rajagopal of New York University and will be held at the India International Centre in New Delhi December 21-22, 2012.

This conference is open to the public without charge, but registration is required. For more information and to register, please go to http://thelong1980s.wordpress.com/

On his first official state visit to Minnesota, the Prime Minister of
the Tibetan Government-in-Exile, Dr. Lobsang Sangay, will be speaking
on campus in a guest lecture on US-China relations, the situation
inside Tibet, and human rights in the region, followed by a Q&A
session with the audience.

A Harvard Law School graduate, Dr. Sangay is the first democratically
elected Tibetan Prime Minister after His Holiness the Dalai Lama
devolved political power to him in 2011. He was a Senior Fellow at the
East Asian Legal Studies Program at Harvard Law School after he
obtained his LL.M. He is an expert on international law, democratic
constitutions, and contemporary China. In 2007, he was selected as one
of the twenty-four Young Leaders of Asia by the Asia Society and a
delegate to the World Justice Forum in Vienna, Austria, where top
legal experts and judges from around the world congregate.

The event will take place next Friday, October 12, 2012 at Walter
Mondale Hall (the law school) in Room 25. Doors open at 3:30 and the
event will begin at 4:00pm.

You can rsvp on the Facebook event page here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/492483977428396/

Please feel free to contact Tenzin Pelkyi at palky001@umn.edu with any
questions about the event.

Macalester Event: Screening of Jai Bhim Camrade

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Screening of Jai Bhim Comrade
by Anand Patwardhan


Date: Monday, November 12, 2012
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the campus center at Macalester College
Open to the public.

Review: http://kafila.org/2012/03/21/jai-bhim-comrade-patwardhan/

UMN Recital: Indian Vocal Music by Vikas Kashalkar

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This will be a Hindustani (North Indian) Vocal Recital by Vikas Kashalkar of Pune, India, a prominent vocalist of the Gwalior Gharana.

Date: 09/29/2012

Time: 8:00 PM

Location: Lloyd Ultan Recital Hall Ferguson Hall

Contact:

Name: Matthew Rahaim
E-mail: mrahaim@umn.edu
Sponsored by: Music

Events calendar linked here: https://events.umn.edu/021235

Performance: The Other Mr. Gandhi

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The Other Mr. Gandhi
a one-man fictional drama, written, performed and directed by Zaraawar Mistry

Fri-Sat, October 5-6 at 7:30 p.m.

Dreamland Arts
677 Hamline Ave. N.,
St. Paul, MN 55104
651-645-5506
www.dreamlandarts.com

In December 1971 war breaks out between India and Pakistan, and Squadron Leader Rusi Gandhi, a pilot in the Indian Air Force, is sent on a bombing mission into Pakistan. His fate, and that of his wife and children, are the subject of this fictional drama about a Parsi family from Mumbai, and how their lives are interwoven with the ongoing conflict between India and Pakistan. The Parsis are Zoroastrians who emigrated to India from Iran in the 10th century.

The Other Mr. Gandhi is the third of a series; the previous works Zaraawar has created are Sohrab and Rustum (City Pages' 10 Best of 2002) and Indian Cowboy (Star Tribune's Outstanding Experimental Work 2006). The Other Mr. Gandhi premiered with a sold-out run at Dreamland Arts in St. Paul in February 2012 and opened Illusion Theater's 25th Fresh Ink series in July. Dreamland Arts is a comfortable, welcoming and accessible 40-seat performing arts studio that presents performances, workshops and classes in theater, music, puppetry and dance. The Other Mr. Gandhi is recommended for ages 13+. 90 minutes.

Screening of Jai Bhim Comrade
with acclaimed filmmaker Anand Patwardhan


One of two Minnesota screenings of India's most notable and acclaimed documentary filmmaker, Anand Patwardhan, will be screening and speaking about his newest, award-winning film Jai Bhim Comrade: The atrocity of caste, a tradition of reason, a song that will be sung. India's Dalit (oppressed) castes were abhorred as "untouchables". The film, shot over 14 years follows the music of protest of Maharashtra's Dalits. In an age of increasing bigotry and superstition, it is both a record of recent history as well as eloquent testimony to a rationalist tradition that has survived amongst the subaltern for thousands of years.


Date: Tuesday, October 16th, 2012
Time: 7:00 pm
Duration: 1 hour
Location: Weitz Center for Creativity Theatre, Carleton College, Northfield, MN
Series: Politics, Poetics and Piety: Voices from India's Margins - Two events honoring the work of Professor Eleanor Zelliot, Laird Bell Professor of History, emerita.


Professor Zelliot's acclaimed work on India spanned a broad range of topics and centuries. These two events seek to honor her commitment to documenting the poetics, piety and politics of dalits (oppressed castes), those who have often been relegated to the margins and whose histories and voices have often been forgotten. We take inspiration for these events from her extensive writing and research on the Indian saint traditions, as well as Ambedkar and the movements he inspired.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies, Religion, History, CAMS and the Zelliot Endowment for South Asian Art and Culture

The performance is free and open to the public. If you would like to reserve your free tickets, check the Carleton Asian Studies events site.

Carleton Event: Songs of Longing and Liberation

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Songs of Longing and Liberation


Concert and lecture/demo by classical Hindustani musicians Kalapini Komkali (vocalist),Raya Korgaokar (harmonium) and Sanjay Deshpande (tabla). Featuring the works of singer-saints, Kabir and Tukaram and the woman singer-saint, Mirabai whose poems of piety and protest are a part of a vibrant performance tradition that began in the Medieval period and continues through to this day.


Date: Monday, September 24th, 2012
Time: 7:00 pm
Duration: 1 hour
Location: Weitz Center for Creativity Theatre, Carleton College, Northfield, MN
Series: Politics, Poetics and Piety: Voices from India's Margins - Two events honoring the work of Professor Eleanor Zelliot, Laird Bell Professor of History, emerita.


Professor Zelliot's acclaimed work on India spanned a broad range of topics and centuries. These two events seek to honor her commitment to documenting the poetics, piety and politics of dalits (oppressed castes), those who have often been relegated to the margins and whose histories and voices have often been forgotten. We take inspiration for these events from her extensive writing and research on the Indian saint traditions, as well as Ambedkar and the movements he inspired.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies, History, Religion, Music and the Zelliot Endowment for South Asian Art and Culture

The performance is free and open to the public. If you would like to reserve your free tickets, check the Carleton Asian Studies events site.

Talk: Genealogies of Software Capital in India

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Genealogies of Software Capital in India
by
Carol Upadhya,
Professor in the School of Social Sciences,
National Institute of Advanced Studies,
Bangalore, India


Date: Friday, October 5. 2012
Time: Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm
Place: 445 Blegen Hall
Series: Geography Coffee Hour (co-­‐sponsored with Sociology, Anthropology, and ICGC)

India Fest 2012

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India Association of Minnesota (IAM) cordially invites you to participate in IndiaFest on Saturday, August 11, 2012 at the St. Paul Capitol Ground, from 12-6 PM.

Click for details


Understanding Taliban: Creating Strategies
for Peace in Afghanistan and Pakista
n

by Andrew Jilani, Ed.D.
Adjunct Professor, Smith College


Date: Wednesday, June 20

Time: 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Dinner (6:00) featuring vegetarian Pakistani foods.
Presentation (6:45) and discussion.

Place: Faith Mennonite Church, 2720 E. 22nd St., Minneapolis


Fundraiser to support Dr. Jilani's research.
Freewill donations will be accepted.
Everyone welcome!
Please RSVP to faithmc@faithmennonite.org

Dr. Jilani is a Pakistani currently living in the Seward neighborhood of Minneapolis.
His areas of teaching and research include international development and human rights,
social justice education, and conflict transformation.


The Exceptional State of Pakistan:

Catastrophe, Biopolitics and Hauntology

by
Najeeb Jan

Department of Geography
University of Colorado at Boulder


Date: Friday, April 13. 2012
Time: Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm
Place: 445 Blegen Hall
Series: Geography Coffee Hour

In 1983 Tariq Ali published his influential "Can Pakistan Survive?" a book that was immediately banned by the U.S. backed Islamizing dictator General Zia-ul-Haq. Almost three decades later we might respond "Canned -- Pakistan Survives!". Without doubt Pakistan is today a troubled space, a dense cite of multiple overlapping and intersecting catastrophes. Drawing on Heidegger's critique of Western metaphysics and Agamben's analysis of the sovereign exception, this paper discloses the abandoned form that Pakistan's survival takes. In particular it examines the devastating impact of the mullah-military complex which has today resulted in a virtual indistinction between democracy and martial law. If Pakistan is indeed a nation/notion possessed by power, a place where the violent biopolitical logics of partition continue to unfold, then perhaps prior to concrete historico-political analysis, we might entertain the thought of an exorcism; a form of ontological exegesis, or drawing out, with a view to conjuring the name of the daemon -- the separator -- that continues to haunt the region. In short, what does the exemplary crisis reveal about the contemporary nomos of the modern and the specific cartographies of power and paradigms of government in Pakistan.

Co-hosted and co-sponsored by the Institute for Global Studies

Talk on Pharmaceutical Industry - India and US

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Pharmaceutical Crises and Questions of Value:
Terrains and Logics of Global Therapeutic Politics


Presentation by Kaushik Sunder Rajan

Date: 04/02/2012
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Place: 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education


Kaushik Sunder Rajan explores how the contemporary global terrain of drug development is constituted by different logics of crisis. He explores this terrain through an empirical focus on pharmaceutical logics and politics in the United States and India today, which are constituted, at the very least, by interrelations between multinational corporate interests, the local generic drug industry, neo-liberal patient consumers, marginalized experimental subjects of clinical trials, and global civil society advocates for access to essential medicines. He argues that the constitutive state of crisis experienced by all of these entities (though in different ways and with different stakes) is a consequence of the playing out of structural logics of global capital and biocapital. These logics are constituted by the value systems of speculative capitalism; the instrument of intellectual property; the imperatives of the globalization of biomedicine; and the way in which health itself comes to be appropriated by capital as a source of value. In the process, he suggests that value in biocapital itself needs to be conceptualized.

Kaushik Sunder Rajan is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He works on the political economy of the life sciences, with an ethnographic focus on the United States and India. He is the author of Biocapital: The Constitution of Postgenomic Life (Duke, 2006) and the editor of Lively Capital: Biotechnologies, Ethics and Governance in Global Markets (Duke, 2012).

Talk: Globalization Lived Locally: Labour in Kerala

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"Globalization Lived Locally:
A Labour Geography Perspective on Control, Conflict
and Response among Workers in Kerala "


by
Neethi P.

Event: Geography Coffee Hour
Day: Friday, February 17, 2012
Time: Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm
Place: 445 Blegen Hall

Supported by the labour geography framework, I analyse how spatial practices of labour shape the economic geography of capitalism; by looking into a model not at a global but at a very local scale of organization and showing its effectiveness while confronting social actors organized at global or extra-local scales. Questioning global stereotypes on economic responses to globalization, I argue that labour is actively involved in the very process of globalization and expansion of capital, empirically demonstrating the relevance of this in the globalization literature. I deal with one region - Kerala - and processes in its labour markets, taking the case of apparel workers in an export promoting industrial park.

Neethi P. is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Department of Geography, University of Georgia; PhD Scholar, Centre for Development Studies (CDS), Trivandrum, India.

Co-organized and co-sponsored by the Department of Geography and the Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

International Education Week: Information Fair

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What: International Education Week: Information Fair and Gathering
When: Thursday, November 17, 2011 • 2:00-4:00 p.m.
Where: Ames Library of South Asia (sub basement of Wilson Library)

Free and open to the public

Please join us at the Ames Library of South Asia to celebrate International Education Week (IEW). A joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education, IEW was first held in 2000 and today is celebrated in more than 100 countries worldwide.

Meet University of Minnesota Libraries' staff and learn about our collections. This is a free event. Everyone is welcome!

Light refreshments will be served.

http://blog.lib.umn.edu/lib-web/events/wilson-library-events/international-education-week-i.html

Screening: Harvest of Grief

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South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA)

Presents

DOCUMENTARY SCREENING: "HARVEST OF GRIEF"
©harvestofgrief.org

Date: Tuesday November 8, 2011
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Place: Walter Mondale Hall Room 20

INDIAN SNACKS WILL BE PROVIDED.

"Harvest of Grief chronicles the growing number of farmer suicides in the northern Indian State of Punjab. The story is told through the eyes of the women and children left behind by these farmers. The film touches upon the human and social cost of 'solutions' to hunger such as the Green Revolution. It explores the severe agricultural crisis caused by economic liberalization, globalization, and the myopic business strategies of profit-seeking multinational corporations." For more information visit: http://www.harvestofgrief.com


Talk: India - Recent Works

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India - Recent Works

by Snehal Shah, Architect

Date: Thursday, October 27
Time: 12 pm
Place: 445 Heller Hall
Series: Global Practices in Architecture Lecture Series

Snehal Shah is an Architect and Urban Designer based in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. He received a BArch from The Center for Environmental Planning and Technology University and his Graduate Diploma from the Architectural Association in London, completing his final year's thesis under the guidance of Balkrishna Doshi. In 1981, Shah was awarded the Royal Institute of British Architects Research Award. After working with Mario Botta in Lugano, Switzerland, Shah returned to Ahmedabad to teach at CEPT University and establish his own studio practice in 1987. He has written several articles which have been published in journals internationally and co-edited Marg Magazine's issue dedicated to the architecture of Ahmedabad.

Adventures in ornithology: Transformations in a field science in Sri Lanka


by Arjun Guneratne
Associate Professor, Depts of Anthropology & Asian Languages and Cultures, Macalester College

Date: Friday, September 16. 2011
Time: Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm
Place: 445 Blegen Hall
Series: Geography Coffee Hour
poster

This talk examines the shift in the techniques of ornithology from a field science based on collecting specimens, in which the chief tools were rifles, shotguns and other kinds of collecting equipment to modern birdwatching, which relies on field guides and optical
equipment. While this shift has been generally attributed to the availability of new technology and the development of a conservationist ethic in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that was less tolerant of broad-scale collecting of specimens, there has
been no detailed study of the particular social and political forces that impacted this transformation in particular contexts. In this talk, I examine the transformation of ornithology in its Sri Lankan context and relate it to the rise of a native Sri Lankan elite during the middle of the 20th century, which did not share the values and interests of the British expatriates who had established ornithology in Sri Lanka. This transformation can be attributed to the development of new technologies such as field guides and binoculars, the emergence of a preservationist ethos during the first half of the twentieth
century that frowned on collecting animal specimens generally, but also the transformations in the social foundations of birding, as it shifted from one social group (and its system of values) to another, and the institutional constraints that were put on collecting specimens as political power shifted and new values were given
expression in law.

Known Unknowns: The Problem with GMO Research [in Warangal, India]


by Glenn Davis Stone
Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology and Environmental Studies
Washington University, St. Louis

Date: Thursday, September 29
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 125 Nolte
Series: Institute for Advanced Study Thursdays at Four Series
Poster

Glenn Davis Stone is a professor of Sociocultural Anthropology and Environmental Studies at the Washington University in St. Louis. His recent work focuses on ecological, social, and political aspects of the introduction of genetically modified crops in developing countries, particularly India and Nigeria. He is most recently the author of "Field vs. Farm in Warangal: Bt Cotton, Higher Yields, and larger Questions" and he discusses food, farming, and biotechnology on his regularly updated blog, Fieldquestions. Prof. Stone's talk is organized in conjunction with the Institute for Advanced Study's interdisciplinary facultry seminar, "Talking Over Food: Abundance and Scarcity in the 21st Century," and is part of the University Symposium on Abundance and Scarcity.

Are We Entering an Age of Urban Revolution? Rethinking the "Miracles" of Shanghai and Bangalore in Light of the "Uprisings" in Cairo and London

by Michael Goldman
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Global Studies, and the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change (ICGC)

September 13, 2011
12:00 to 1:30 p.m. (Lunch served at noon)
101 University International Center (map)
331 17th Ave SE, East Bank

All are welcome but RSVPs are appreciated!

Or watch online at https://umconnect.umn.edu/tuesday/

As a member of a university-wide collaboration, the Global Urban Laboratory, Professor Goldman introduces in this talk the idea that we have entered the age of urban revolutions. Three types will be presented. First, since the early 1990s, there has been a sea change in policies toward the urban, with leaders using cities as platforms for national integration into the global economy. By putting up for sale public goods and urban spaces, they are transforming the structure of labor and production, politics and rights, and access to space and goods in our cities.

Consequently and secondly, popular protests globally are sparking what appear to be political revolutions with deep urban roots and ambitions (e.g., Jakarta, Cairo, Tunis, Santiago, Madrid). Third, urban scholars and activists has begun to rethink the staleness of our intellectual frameworks, inspiring a conceptual revolution grounded less in old models emanating from our traditional notions of global cities (London and New York) and more from new ways of seeing complex realities unfolding in cities in the global South. The talk will highlight dimensions to these three "urban revolutions," with a focus on Goldman's own research on Indian cities.

Exhibition, Lecture and Reception

What: Collector's Talk: Donald Clay Johnson's Paritosh Collection
When: Sunday, September 18, 2011 • 2:00-4:00 p.m.
Where: 33 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108
Free and open to the public

Join us for a talk by former curator of the Ames Library of South Asia at the University of Minnesota and noted Indian textile collector Donald Clay Johnson. He will talk about the origins of his Paritosh Collection, a selection of which is on exhibit at the Goldstein Museum of Design, and his experiences as a collector.

This exhibition showcases saris, shawls, and home textiles collected over 50 years by Dr. Johnson. Johnson began collecting during a year's residence in India in 1962 and named the collection "Paritosh," or "contentment," after his host family's compound. The handcraft techniques include ikat weaving, several varieties of embroidery, block printing, bandhani and lahariya varieties of tie-dye, and more.

Please visit collector Donald Clay Johnson's online archive to see images from his collection.

For more information about the exhibition, click here.

Workshop: Transforming your dissertation into a book
Sponsored by the American Institute of Indian Studies
Madison, Oct. 19-20, 2011


Sponsored by the several organizations devoted to the study of South Asia, this workshop aims to help a select number of recent PhDs re-vision their doctoral dissertations as books. Applications to participate are due by June 15, 2011, emailed to Susan S. Wadley, sswadley@syr.edu. Participants must arrange their own transport and stays to Madison, Wisconsin for the Annual Conference on South Asia in October. The workshop will begin at 7:30 pm Wednesday evening, Oct. 19 , and all participants are expected to be present at this time.

For selection: Required is an email containing a current cv; the dissertation abstract, its table of contents, and its first chapter plus a not more than 5 page "book proposal" , as if you were submitting to a press (a three- to six-page description of the project, including its purpose, potential audience, scope, contribution to scholarship, and relations to existing literature, including a vision of the book as different from the dissertation). Email to sswadley@syr.edu by midnight on June 15, 2011.

Susan S. Wadley (Anthropology, Syracuse), Convener, plus other more 'senior' scholars will be present in each concurrent session. Their role is to read the materials prior to the meeting and be prepared to intervene and comment, "in the background" primarily, though with key interventions as needed.

Two talks by Nikhil Anand

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Nikhil Anand, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Haverford College, will be making the following two public presentations on Wednesday, March 23 and Thursday, March 24.


Municipal Disconnect: On Abject Water and its Urban Systems

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
1:30pm
Room 389, HHH (Anthropology Seminar Room)
an informal brownbag discussion co-sponsored with the Institute for Global Studies.


Leaky States: On Ignorance and Absence in Mumbai's Water Supply
Thursday, March 24, 2011
12:15 pm
Room 155, Blegen Hall.
public presentation

Dissertation into book workshop, 2011

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Workshop:
Transforming your dissertation into a book
Sponsored by the American Institute of Indian Studies
Madison, Oct. 19-20, 2011

Sponsored by the several organizations devoted to the study of South Asia, this workshop aims to help a select number of recent PhDs re-vision their doctoral dissertations as books. Applications to participate are due by June 15, 2011.
Click here for details.
"Time in Early Modern Islam: Calendar, Ceremony, and Chronology in the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman Empires"

By Stephen Blake
St. Olaf College

Date: 02/11/2011
Time: 12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: 1210 Heller Hall

Description:
Please join the Center for Early Modern History for a lecture by Stephen Blake of St. Olaf College entitled, "Time in Early Modern Islam: Calendar, Ceremony, and Chronology in the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman Empires.'"

You may bring your own lunch or join in the light repast provided by the Center. If you have any additional questions, contact cemh@umn.edu or visit the Center for Early Modern History in Heller Hall, room 1030.

For further information:
https://events.umn.edu/009751
Center for Early Modern History


Please Join the Panel Discussion on


DISSENT AND REPRESSION IN THE US AND INDIA

February 10, 2011; 7-8.30 PM
445 Blegen Hall, U of M West Bank
269 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis, MN 55455


On September 24, 2010, FBI raided the homes of peace activists in Minneapolis and Chicago, seizing computers, phones and large amount of documents and personal items. Since then, 23 activists in both these cities have been subpoenaed to appear before a grand jury. No one has been charged and lacking any material evidence, the United States government is clearly carrying out a campaign of intimidating people, who did little more than speak out for peace and justice.

On December 24, 2010, Dr. Binayak Sen, a renowned physician, public health and human rights activist, was sentenced to life in prison by a sessions court in the Indian state of Chhattisgarh on baseless charges of 'sedition' and 'conspiracy against the state'. This extreme action comes on top of the arrest and conviction of several political and human rights activists in different parts of India in the last few years.

Come find out more about these cases and the context in which these acts of repression and silencing of dissent are occurring in the US and in India!

Panelists
Michelle Gross, Communities United Against Police Brutality
Jess Sundin, Anti-War Committee
Lalit Batra, International Campaign to Free Binayak Sen

Moderator: Prof. Vinay Gidwani, Dept of Geography, University of Minnesota

(Snacks and drinks will be served after the discussion)


Contact: Lalit Batra (lalitbatra@gmail.com, 612-2293358) or Karthik Ramanathan (ramanath.karthik@gmail.com, 9789962292)

Spring 2011 Seminar Series: Asia/Gender

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SPRING 2011 SEMINAR SERIES
ASIA/GENDER

This semester, instead of two separate talk series - the South Asia Seminar and the East Asia Seminar - we will host a joint series, broadly focusing on questions of gender. Our plan is to generate an interdisciplinary and inter-regional discussion and we hope you will join us in our new endeavor. Talks will be about 30 minutes long, followed by a 10 minute response from a designated respondent. After that, we will have time for an open discussion. All are invited. [download schedule]

Time & Place:
Wednesdays at 3:30 P.M. in 710 Social Science, unless otherwise indicated.

Wednesday, January 26th:

"Acting Real: From Semiosis to Mimesis in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Performance"

Jason McGrath (UMN - Asian Languages & Literatures)
Respondent: Juliette Cherbuliez (UMN - French & Italian)

In the early 1930s the Chinese silent film actor Ruan Lingyu was praised for her naturalistic, almost Stanislovskian performance style. She thus seemed to answer the call of Chinese filmmakers and critics for a distinctively cinematic performance style, based on mimesis, that would be distinct from stage acting, particularly the semiosis of traditional Chinese drama. However, the seeming "naturalism" of such acting belies the gendered performances of modernity entailed in this early Chinese cinematic realism. Moreover, the claims for medium specificity obscure the fact that discourses of realism and mimesis were far from confined to cinema but were in fact indicative of a broader scientism sweeping the intellectual and artistic classes in semicolonial China in the 1910s-30s.


Wednesday, February 9th:
Brett de Bary (Cornell University)
Respondent: Simona Sawhney (UMN - Asian Languages & Literatures)

Wednesday, February 23rd:
Diyah Larasati (UMN - Theatre & Dance)
Respondent: Hiromi Mizuno (UMN - History)

Wednesday, March 30th:

TBA

Wednesday, April 13th:

Raka Ray (University of California, Berkeley)
Respondent: Lisa Sun-Hee Park (UMN - Sociology)

Wednesday, April 20th:

Satish Poduval (English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad)
Respondent: Christine Marran (UMN - Asian Languages & Literatures)


Friday Lecture: Gesture in Indian Vocal Music

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Gesture in Indian Vocal Music

by Matt Rahaim

Friday, December 3
Ferguson Hall, Room 280
3:30 pm
Free and open to the public.

Observers of Indian classical music have long commented on the extensive, ubiquitous, near-constant gestural performance of Indian vocalists. Twentieth-century music critics have usually dismissed the gestures of musicians as extra-musical theatrics. In actuality, however, this disciplined motion embodies a special kind of musical knowledge, one that implicitly theorizes melody as motion, that constructs melodic objects, and that is transmitted tacitly through vocal lineages. The transmission of this knowledge through gesture results in lineages of vocalists who not only sound similar, but who engage with music kinesthetically according to similar melodic models and ethical ideals. On the other hand, the musicking body of any individual singer is idiosyncratic and personal, and embodies a musical ethos through both conscious choice and unconscious inheritance. This talk will explore the implications of gestural performance for melodic theory, pedagogy, and theories of the musicking body.

Matt Rahaim is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at UMN. He is a scholar and longtime student of Hindustani vocal music.

The Environmental Support Group (ESG) is amongst the foremost proponents in India for the reform of environmental decision making processes, urging that these processes be made more participatory and environmentally and socially just. ESG-initiated or supported campaigns have been largely successful despite the nature of the issues being highly controversial and politically sensitive with national-level implications. In acknowledgment of its influencing role, ESG's services have been sought by a variety of regional, national and international agencies.


Wednesday, November 10

Securing the Commons and Environmental Justice in India
5:30 - 7:00pm
Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy,
2104 Stevens Ave South, Minneapolis, MN


Thursday, November 11

Contested Terrains: Securing Environmental Justice in a GDP Driven Economy

12:00 - 1:00pm
JBD Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College


What's Happening to Indian Democracy in these Expansionary Times?
Part of the South Asia Seminar Series
4:30 - 6:00pm
1114/1183 Social Sciences Building, University of Minnesota


Friday, November 12

Bangalore, India: The world's "model city" in conflict
12:00 - 1:00pm
531 Heller Hall, ICGC Commons


Sponsored by the Institute for Global Studies,
the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change,
the Institute for Advanced Study,
Macalester College's MDC, MAC CARES, and MASECA,
the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Securing the Commons and Environmental Justice in India

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Securing the Commons and Environmental Justice in India


Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Please RSVP
5:30 - 7:00 pm
2104 Stevens Ave S, Minneapolis, MN


Be it genetic diversity, lakes, urban commons or grazing pastures and forests, there is a dynamic shift currently occurring in Indian law and policy to commodify the commons and make them available for profit. How does India's current path reflect the historic commodification that occurred here in the United States? What insights can we gain for developing socially just environmental policy in the Midwest moving forward?

Join Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy's (IATP's) Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy for a discussion with Leo Saldanha and Bhargavi Rao, directors of the Environment Support Group (ESG), based in Bangalore, India. The Environment Support Group has been raising important questions about the value of community action, law and policy in protecting public interest, considering that the commons are critical to the sustenance of livelihoods of the poor in urban and rural areas, and especially for natural resource-dependent communities. They have worked with local communities to counter mining pressure in Orissa, been part of the effort to instate a moratorium on the release of a new genetically modified organism: Bt Brinjal, conducted analysis to protect national coastal and forest protection laws, and campaigned against unjust infrastructure projects--all in the face of rapidly expanding consumerism and commodification of India's natural resources.
Please RSVP

South Asia seminar this Wednesday - Brendan LaRocque

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Changing Perceptions of Muslim and Hindu Relations

in Bundelkhand under Mughal Rule

Brendan LaRocque
(Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in History, Carleton College)


Wednesday, November 3rd
3:30 - 5:00
609 Social Sciences Tower


Brendan LaRocque's talk will examine the role religion played in the relationship between the Bundela rulers of Bundelkhand (in modern day Madhya Pradesh) and the Mughal empire. He will focus on questions of identity and religious ideology in the rebellion of Maharaja Chhatrasal Bundela (1649-1731) against the empire during the reign of Emperor Aurangzeb. Chattrasal's rebellion has conventionally been understood as being motivated by his desire to protect Hinduism from imperial depradations carried out in the name of Islam. LaRocque will call this view into question through an examination of the ways in which contemporary sources represented the nature and rationale for Chhatrasal's rebellion, and present an alternative theory of the Bundelas' understanding of the uprising.


Brendan LaRocque is Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow at Carleton College. His research is concerned with the role of religion and identity in Mughal India, with a focus on the intersection of religion with the political and economic realms. He is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively titled "Islam, Hinduism, and Community Formation in India: Devotional Religion and Social Change in the Mughal Empire."

Fundraiser for Pakistan Floods

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Download flier

Had-Anhad
(Bounded Boundless)
Journeys with Ram and Kabir


A film by Shabnam Virmani


When: 1:30 - 3:30 pm, October 30 (Sat.)
Where: St. Anthony Main Theater; 115 SE Main St., Mpls, MN
Donation: $10.00 (Larger donations welcome)

All donations will be sent to Mehergarh Foundation, Pakistan (www.mgf-usa.org)

Had-Anhad, by Shabnam Virmani, is a lively, dramatic film that will move you to faith, hope, and tenderness in this time of crisis and emergency. The film is focused on Kabir, the 15th century mystic poet of north India who defied the boundaries between Hindu and Muslim. He had a Muslim name and upbringing, but his poetry repeatedly invokes the widely revered Hindu name for God - Ram.


Who is Kabir's Ram? Kabir renders a different Ram from contemporary invocations of the Hindu God Ram, and a South Asia different from that portrayed in contemporary politics. This film journeys through song and poem into the politics of religion, and finds a myriad answers on both sides of the hostile border between India and Pakistan. Join us on a journey through Gujarat, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Karachi as we listen to folk musicians give us mesmerizing renditions of Kabir bhajans and dohas. (In Hindi & Urdu with English Subtitles: 103 min.)

Sponsored by: Independent voices concerned about South Asia, Pangea World Theater, Minnesota Cuba committee. For more info, contact: ramanath.karthik@gmail.com

South Asia Seminar Series, Fall 2010

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The South Asian Seminar began in 2005 as an intellectual collective group funded by the Institute for Global Studies. The South Asian Seminar Series brings scholars, writers, and filmmakers from the U of M, local colleges and universities as well as national and international speakers to share their ideas and scholarship with the University community and beyond. Click here for a downloadable version.


South Asia Seminar Series - Fall Semester 2010

Please note: while most seminars fall during the usual Wednesday time, their locations vary and one meeting is on a Thursday.


Wednesday, October 6th:
Pritika Chowdhry (Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts, Macalester College)
"Remembering the Crooked Line: Visualizing Ethnic Fissures and Partitions through Memory Sculptures of the Gendered Body and Childhood Games"
3:30 - 5:00
335 Blegen Hall


Wednesday, October 20th:

Lalit Batra (Ph.D. Student, Department of Geography, University of Minnesota)
"Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Urban Poor in 'World Class' Delhi"
3:30 - 5:00
609 Social Sciences Tower


Wednesday, November 3rd:

Brendan LaRocque (Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in History, Carleton College)
"Changing Perceptions of Muslim and Hindu Relations in Bundelkhand Under Mughal Rule"
3:30 - 5:00
609 Social Sciences Tower


Thursday, November 11th:
Leo Saldhana & Bhargavi Rao (Co-Directors, Environment Support Group, Bangalore)
"What's Happening to Indian Democracy During These Expansionary Times?"
4:30 - 6:00
1114/1183 Social Sciences Tower

*Please note the day and time change.*
Co-sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change.


Wednesday, November 17th:

Ruth Vanita (Professor of Liberal Studies and of Women's & Gender Studies, University of Montana)
"'The Joys of Delhi': Female Urbanity in Late Eighteenth- / Early Nineteenth-Century Urdu Poetry"
3:30 - 5:00
609 Social Sciences Tower

Co-sponsored by the Department of English.

Dissertation into book workshop

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Several South Asia scholarly institutes will be holding the second dissertation into book workshop at the Madison South Asia conference in October. This is an excellent opportunity for recent PhDs. Applications to participate are due by June 15, 2010.

Click here for details

"Development Reconsidered" Speaker Series

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"Development Reconsidered" is a speaker series being hosted by an interdisciplinary group of U of MN graduate students. The speaker series is intended to promote a critical reexamination of the field of international development and the future of development programs. Download flyer here.


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

February 15th,
6:30 pm, Coffman Memorial Union Theater, Coffman
Memorial Union, East Bank, University of Minnesota

Twin Cities Faculty Panel
Participants:
• Dr. Michael Goldman, Associate Professor and McKnight Presidential
Fellow, Department of Sociology,  University of Minnesota - Twin Cities 
• Dr. Amy Damon, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics,
Macalester College, St. Paul
• Dr. William G. Moseley, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of
Geography, Macalester College, St. Paul
• Dr. Samuel Zalanga, Professor, Department of Anthropology and
Sociology, Bethel University, St. Paul

Facilitator:
Dr. Frances Vavrus, Associate Professor, Department of Organizational
Leadership, Policy, and Development, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities


"Development Reconsidered"!with Walden Bello
Dr. Walden Bello, Congressman, Republic of the Philippines and Founder,
Focus on the Global South
March 8th, 7:00 pm, Cowles Auditorium, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of
Public Affairs, West Bank, University of Minnesota
March 9th, 2:00-4:00 pm, place: TBA
Discussion with Walden Bello


"Development Reconsidered"!with Carol Lancaster
Dr. Carol Lancaster, Interim Dean of the Edmund A. Walsh School of
Foreign Service at Georgetown University
April 12th, 7:00 pm, Cowles Auditorium, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of
Public Affairs, West Bank, University of Minnesota
April 13th, 2:00-4:00 pm, place: TBA
Discussion with Carol Lancaster


"Development Reconsidered"!with Karen Mundy
Dr. Karen Mundy, Associate Professor, Ontario Institute for Studies in
Education, University of Toronto
May 10th, 7:00 pm, Cowles Auditorium, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of
Public Affairs, West Bank, University of Minnesota
May 11th, 2:00-4:00 pm, place: TBA
Discussion with Karen Mundy

South Asia Seminar Series, Spring 2010

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The South Asian Seminar began in 2005 as an intellectual collective group funded by the Institute for Global Studies. The South Asian Seminar Series brings scholars, writers, and filmmakers from the U of M, local colleges and universities as well as national and international speakers to share their ideas and scholarship with the University community and beyond.

South Asia Seminar Series, Spring 2010 Schedule
All events will be 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.
710 Social Science Building

February 17
Papori Bora, Doctoral Candidate
Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota
Gender, Democracy and Citizenship in India's Northeast

March 3
Aamir Mufti, Associate Professor
Department of Comparative Literature, UCLA
Orientalism and the Institution of World Literatures

March 31
Kumkum Sangari, Vilas Professor
Department of English, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Medieval into modern: the episteme of romance in the Nehruvian era

April 14
Sugata Ray, Doctoral Candidate
Deparment of Art History, University of Minnesota
In the name of Krishna: The making of a modern Hindu self

April 28
Sabina Sawhney, Associate Professor
Department of English, Hofstra University
Sikhism, Punjabi and the North American University

Talk: Right to Health- Linkages between health and Human Rights


Wednesday, Dec. 2
12 - 1 p.m.
614 Social Science from

Every country in the world is now party to at least one human rights treaty that addresses health-related rights. This includes the right to health as well as other rights that relate to conditions necessary for health. The talk will be on inter-linkages of health and human rights and will trace the global peoples health movement with specific emphasis on PHM India. How rights based perspective has been used at grass root level to seek accountability from the Governments.

--------------------------------------------

Video Screening: Another World is Possible


12/03/2009
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
614 Social Sciences

Description:
Another World is Possible is a documentary produced and directed by Aisha Gazdar, which details the role of the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (Cedaw). South Asian countries such as Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal comprise one-fifth of the world's population, and have a female-to-male ratio of 94 per cent. Their people's rich, diverse cultural heritages run side to side with a deep-rooted disparity of wealth and access to resources. One kind of disparity, however, pervades the entire region -- discrimination against women. Underscoring this issue, Another World is Possible speaks of how the governments of these countries have ratified the Cedaw and are using it as a tool to "ensure the full development and advancement of women in all spheres." The film also examines how South Asian from diverse occupational spheres deal with discrimination in their lives.

Presenter:
Kamayani Bali Mahabal, a lawyer and human rights activist who pitches for health rights, women's health and women's rights, and other issues of social justice, is attending the 2009 annual meeting of the American Public Health Association. She was part of the fact-finding team that investigated the demolition of Vanavasi Chetana Ashram, our partner in Chhattisgarh.

Flavia Agnes Lecture

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"State Control and Sexual Morality - The Case of the Bar Dancers of Mumbai"
by Flavia Agnes

This public lecture will address the concerns of women who danced in bars in Mumbai and the issue of public morality which led to a ban on bar dancing. The lecture will discern the contradictory pulls and diverse feminist positions which were foregrounded in the campaign and the various legal issues which were raised in the Public Interest Litigation before the Bombay High Court. The entire campaign will be traced through Agnes's own engagement with this issue.

----------

Flavia Agnes is a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and founder of Majlis, a legal and cultural resource centre in Mumbai, India. She is a relentless advocate of gender equality through the law and a staunch critic of the Uniform Civil Code. Agnes appeared before the Sri Krishna Commission enquiry into the 1992 riots in the Indian cities of Mumbai and Berhampada. She has written and published extensively, including in the journals Subaltern Studies, Economic and Political Weekly, and Manushi on the themes of minorities and the law, feminist jurisprudence, gender and law, and law in the context of women's movements. She is author of the book, Law and Gender Inequality: the Politics of Women's Rights in India, published by Oxford University Press (1999).

Friday, November 6, 2009
2:00-3:30 pm
30 Hubert Humphrey Hall

Michael Goldman talk

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"How the Financial Crisis is Reshaping 'World Cities"
by Michael Goldman
Associate Professor of Sociology,
University of Minnesota

This talk highlights a global shift in capital flows, post-2007: from Northern hedge/derivatives firms into real estate and infrastructure projects in Southern cities such as Mumbai and Bangalore. We will discuss how urban planning in our global South 'world cities' is being influenced by these toxic forms of financial speculation.

ICGC Brown Bag Series
Friday November 6, 2009
12:00 pm
537 Heller Hall

South Asia Seminar Series, Fall 2009

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The South Asian Seminar began in 2005 as an intellectual collective group funded by the Institute for Global Studies. The South Asian Seminar Series brings scholars, writers, and filmmakers from the U of M, local colleges and universities as well as national and international speakers to share their ideas and scholarship with the University community and beyond.


South Asia Seminar Series, Fall 2009 Schedule
All events will be 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.
710 Social Science Building

September 23
Simona Sawhney, Associate Professor
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota
End of War


October 7
Keya Ganguly, Professor
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, University of Minnesota
Sensuous Magic: Image and Objectivity in Satyajit Ray's "Devi"

October 21
Saloni Mathur, Associate Professor
Department of Art History, UCLA
Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History
India and Gauguin's Tahitian Nudes: Modernism in a Global Frame

November 4
Emily Rook-Koepsel, Doctoral Candidate
Department of History, University of Minnesota
An All Indian Organization for All Indian Women

November 18
Chris Pinney, Professor
Department of Anthropology and Visual Culture, University College London
Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History
The Colonial Dromosphere: Speed, Transmission and Prosthesis in Colonial India

December 2
Pashmina Murthy, Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota
Land Without Women: Infanticide and the Politics of Mourning

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the South Asia Events category.

South Asia Courses at the U is the previous category.

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