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April 2010 Archives

Letterpress

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Letterpress brings the digits back into the digital

Did you know the University of Minnesota's graphic design program has its own letterpress studio? You'll have a chance to visit it at this year's Communicators Forum conference on May 13. Associate Professor James Boyd Brent will be presenting a hands-on demonstration in the Session I Design Break Out.

Here's an interesting documentary about letterpress printing:

Poll: Web site or website?

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I've been slow getting this poll up, so by now I'm sure you've all heard about the AP Stylebook's decision to change Web site to website.

AP twitter announcement

Do you think they made the right decision? Please vote in the poll below!

*"Televisionshow" comment hat tip to @nprmonkeysee.

Interview: U of M-Crookston Web site redesign

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Crookston Web siteThis is the 18th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Amber Bailey on the University of Minnesota, Crookston Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
We are in the process of moving all of our sites to UMContent, and our Admissions site was one of the first major sites to be moved into the system. Our old Admissions site was designed in the summer of 2006, so the age of it was also another driving factor.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
We looked at our current web statistics to determine what our users looked at the most. We also researched other University Admissions sites to see how they were structuring their sites and to see what new features they were using. We also looked at some research that Cappex did on "What High School Counselors Want from College Admissions". Overall, it was many factors that helped us determine how to redesign/re-structure the site.

How did you think about the visual design of your site within the
context of the University brand?

On all of our new Crookston sites, we are using the University approved header (with some slight modifications for our campus) and footer. The body of the page will differ from site to site, but will always have a larger banner on the homepage of the site and a smaller (modified) banner on all the subpages. Our campus really likes the flexibility of the 960 grid system.

What was the biggest challenge, and how did you get past it?
Our biggest challenge was how to narrow our main navigation down to as few links as possible (even though the list is still a bit long). We worked and reworked the navigation several times - and came up with categories of links.

How did you manage the project and keep it on track?
We kept setting mini-goals. First goal - initial meeting; second goal - research; third goal - site map/structure; fourth goal - design; fifth goal - content creation/refreshment; sixth goal - putting the site together (design/content) in UMContent; seventh goal - training admissions staff to keep the site updated. On each of these goals we set deadlines - it helped keep us on track.

What tips do you have for other units redesigning their Web sites?
I have done many re-designs of websites, and since we are a University and have many different groups/people we need to talk with, it's easy to forget who you said what to and what you decided on. I feel that taking really good notes (with dates attached), keeping a folder with the all the information for a particular site, and writing out "to-do" lists for everyone involved (so they have it in writing) has seemed to make the process of redesign a lot smoother. "Patience" is also a very good thing to have ...things come up during the process that might change things or get them off track... so setting and being able to "reset" those mini-goals is very important.

How are you evaluating the redesign's success?
We continue to look at the website statistics and get verbal and written feedback.

UMCF Member Kris Layon has a book deal

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Congratulations to Forum member Kris Layon, who as a result of his leadership of MinneWebCon, has a deal with New Riders (an imprint of Peachpit) to publish his Designing iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad Applications with Web Standards in December 2010. He will also teach design workshops in Minneapolis and Phoenix as part of the Two Apps Per Day workshop series he is launching in June.



Interview: Minnesota Supercomputing Institute Web site

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Supercomputing Institute Web siteThis is the 17th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Tracey Bartlett on the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
The old site was dated and we suspected that our users and potential users weren't readily able to find the information they needed. We also needed to redesign the site to meet the U's new standards. And most of us hated the way the old one looked, anyway. :-)

We had not had a full-time webmaster since early 2002, and had relied on part-time students to handle web updates until late 2007, when the Institute's senior management realized that our users expected more from our website and that we needed to put more of our administrative activities online. We hired a full-time web developer in 2008.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
We worked with the Usability Lab to do a card sort, which helped us figure out the kinds of terms that our users understand and expect. We also tracked the questions we get on our help line and the kinds of questions our User Support and Admin staff get when they work with users and potential users.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
We wanted to make sure that it was easy for our users and potential users to find the forms and information they need. We also wanted to use the website to aid our nascent public-relations efforts.

How did you manage the project and keep it on track?
We set up a web-development team to discuss issues and ideas. The team is headed by the web developer and includes representatives from the three divisions in the Institute (User Support, Systems, Administration). The web developer set a timeline for rollout of the new site and kept the team informed of progress. Team members kept the staffs in their divisions up-to-date with the process and encouraged their review and input as new parts were implemented. Any issues are brought to the team for resolution.

The new website is still very much a work in progress. The next major milestone is that we are going online with our access-request system. We are also implementing a CMS; it's still in beta, but staff are encouraged to use it and submit bug reports.

Senior management involvement was necessary to keeping the timeline on track. All the senior managers and our director have been kept informed of the timeline and when pieces of the new design are planned to be released.

How are you evaluating the redesign's success?
We're monitoring user comments on the help line and in our interactions with the users. We also have feedback links on the site. We're also encouraging staff members to bring up issues to the web team.

Interview: MCDB&G Web site redesign

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MCDB and G Web siteThis is the 16th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Tami Jauert on the Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology and Genetics Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
A big factor was that the previous site was almost 15 years old and looked it. The site had changed hands at least three times and had been pieced together by each person. It was hard to navigate through and worse yet, it was not updated on a regular basis - which unfortunately meant some pages hadn't been touched in years.

Another factor was that the program structure had changed dramatically since the site originated. The site needed to reflect those changes to help avoid student confusion.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
There was a committee that was there to help make decisions about content and structure. The committee had a hard time agreeing, so we narrowed down the target audience and asked them.

We decided the site was mostly directed to students who were already in the program. Incoming students would be directed to another site for application materials etc... So we asked about 10 students to help. We tried to get students who were at different levels of the program and came from different backgrounds. We met with each student individually, giving them index cards with different words and phrases on (things the committee thought should be on the site). The students were asked to decide which things should be "headers" and which things should fall under each "header". They were also given a few blank cards that they could write on - if they felt there was anything missing. In addition, students were allowed to cut items they didn't think needed to be there or felt they would go to another site for.

We tracked the results for each student. Also asking questions about what kinds of visuals were appealing etc...  Most of the students categorized things similarly and in most cases cut the same items. This made it easy for the committee to make decisions about the final site structure.

What was your biggest challenge and how did you get past it?
The biggest challenge was "design by committee." However, it was easy to get past once they agreed the target audience should have some input. Some committee members were skeptical about this process - not sure how the student research was going to help... but when the results came back, there was very little left to discuss.

How are you evaluating the redesign's success?
We are seeing a large increase to the number of return viewers to our site. But the biggest thing, is that we no longer receive the almost daily complaints about the site not working and the information being outdated or incorrect.

Crisis Communication On the Fly

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Some  crises are instant, some give you a heads up.  Either way, you'd better be prepared to manage it effectively! Like many world travelers, my international trip was put on hold during the Icelandic volcano eruption and closure of European air space. Airlines and governments were left trying to communicate about an event that had never happened before.  Below are some links to interesting articles critiquing how these agencies managed (or didn't) their message in the midst of a dynamic disaster.

Social Media as a Crisis Communication Tool during the Icelandic Volcano Eruption (Slide show)

Eileen Wallis talks about crisis communication in the light of unforeseen circumstances (podcast)

Social Media As Crisis Communication (blog, with airline case studies)

Volcanoes and Crisis Planning, BOTH can Burn You (article)

Is "official" crisis communication in a crisis of its own? (article)



As for me, I'm off to France today...barring any further acts of nature or government.




Interview: Office of Student Health Benefits Web site redesign

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Office of Student Health Benefits Web siteThis is the 15th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Britt Bakke on the Office of Student Health Benefits Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
  • improve clarity of information on the web
  • establish the Office of Student Health Benefits as a stand alone website (separate from the Boynton Health Service website)
  • visually tie the Office of Student Health Benefits to the University of Minnesota
What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
We logged feedback from department, staff, and students who visited the site.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
  • content heavy - wanted information easy for students to find
  • several plans on several campuses - navigation needed to be organized in such a way that a student could easily identify the page that applies to them
How did you think about the visual design of your site within the context of the University brand?
This site needed to go up relatively quickly. We basically used a University template as is. Not very many changes to the design. The design is very simple. This website is information focused.

What was the biggest challenge, and how did you get past it?
Fitting all of our content into each page, keeping it well organized and easy to read. Got past this with lots of editing. And still working on it. :)

How did you manage the project and keep it on track?
  • Worked closely with Office of Student Health Benefits staff and web master.
  • Started with a rough outline of the architecture and a timeline and consulted those as needed throughout the project.
What tips do you have for other units redesigning their Web sites? What did you learn from the project?
  • The templates are easy to use
  • CSS rocks
How are you evaluating the site's success?
We continually monitor feedback from departments and current/prospective plan members and make changes as needed.

Interview: BioTechnology Institute Web site redesign

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BioTechnology Institute Web siteThis is the 14th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Tim Montgomery on the BioTechnology Institute Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
The department/unit site for the BioTechnology Institute needed to be updated to conform to University design standards, and we wanted to take advantage of the opportunity to upgrade to a 960 pixel format, conform the look and link navigation between component websites of the Institute (primarily the Biocatalysis Initiative, the Biotechnology Resource Center, the Biotechnology Training Grant, and the Microbial Engineering graduate program), and incorporate a video element and several other features.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
We had several meetings of a marketing/promotions committee and solicited input from users via our Office/Administrative Specialist, who presented examples of websites and website features that she and other users liked to compare and contrast with what the committee members perceived was needed.

What factors went into the organization of the site?
We needed to work within University templates. We wanted universal BioTechnology Institute navigation throughout the different component sites. We wanted special graphic treatment of all home pages including a video element. And, in the end, we ended up carrying through most of the previous navigation structure and content.

Interview: Clinical Virology Programs Web site redesign

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Clinical Virology Programs Web siteThis is the 13th in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Tony Thomas on the Clinical Virology Programs Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
To bring it in line with the approved U of M templates.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
None.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
We're a small unit, so decisions are made on the fly. Everyone wears several hats, so changes are made ad hoc. Essentially, we just want to keep study participants, potential granters and med students up to date about what our program is doing.

How did you think about the visual design of your site within the context of the University brand?
We're too small of a program to put serious thought and resources into our marketing. I'm given a lot of latitude for making changes on our website. I implemented the U of M templates and then made minor changes after reviewing the site with the principal investigator for our program. The process was very informal.

What was the biggest challenge, and how did you get past it?

We use Wordpress to manage the content of our site, so I had to take the templates as they exist now and make them into a Wordpress "theme." Honestly, it wasn't much of a barrier. It mostly consisted of taking the template stylesheet and hooking it onto the Wordpress HTML elements that exist in the default theme.

How did you manage the project and keep it on track?
Easy to do with a staff of one.  ;-)

What tips do you have for other units redesigning their Web sites?
I wish I had advice to give. I think a lot of the decisions are made simply by having templates available and asking units to use them.

How are you evaluating the site's success?
We do use Google Analytics to monitor site traffic, but we don't have a formal review process in place for reasons stated above.

Conference preview: Tom Masterman

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Tom MastermanThe 2010 Communicators Forum conference, Back to Our Roots, is coming up on May 13. We asked some session presenters about their favorite Twin Cities features.

Tom Masterman will be presenting Dialogue Earth: Mining Social Media.


Claim to fame: Largest collection of never-worn Boston sports team championship tee shirts in Minnesota (thanks to his mother, who continually mails them to him)

Favorite local outdoor activity: Walking the charming streets of St. Paul. I love my neighborhood.

Favorite local indoor activity: Visiting the Cities' many unique local coffee shops

Favorite local hangout: Common Roots on Lyndale

Favorite local blog: MinnPost.com

What will attendees learn at your session? I'm going to show you some of the tools you can use to better understand how people are talking about your brand, and the topics related to your industry, in the social media.

Interview: MICaB Web site redesign

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Microbiology Immunology and Cancer Biology Graduate Program Web siteThis is the twelfth in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Tim Leonard on the Microbiology Immunology and Cancer Biology Graduate Program Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
  • The Web site was old and although used a lot it was inefficient and required more clicks than necessary to reach the desired information.
  • The University is requiring compliance with the new format.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
  • After designing test pages I presented it to the director and Louise [Shand].
  • Currently we are accepting requests for alterations from users.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
Ease of getting to important and often used data like: our weekly seminars, application data for prospective students and course information for students during the course

How did you think about the visual design of your site within the context of the University brand?
I took the University templates and decided how to fit our content and make use of the multi panel layout.

What was the biggest challenge, and how did you get past it?
  • Creating pull-down menus to incorporate immediately accessible links that most users need
  • Learning to use the CSS
  • Both issues required a lot of study and trial and error.

How did you manage the project and keep it on track?
There was no time frame other than the end-of-2010 U of M deadline. I was the only one working on the project until I put it online.

What did you learn from the process?
Learning CSS is challenging but doable. For us it was best to have one person do the study and the design. For other units there may be more needs and comments than we have so the challenges will differ.

How are you evaluating the site's success?
It will all be based on comments from students, faculty, and a new director of graduate studies when that person takes over.

Follow UMCF conference presenters on Twitter

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Back to Our Roots illustrationI'm getting very excited for this year's Communicators Forum conference, Back to our Roots. Those of you on Twitter may wish to follow the conference presenters. Here are the ones I found; if you see any I missed, let me know.

Check out conference break-out session descriptions, and don't forget to follow @umcf on Twitter as well.

Interview: Center for Austrian Studies Web site redesign

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Center for Austrian Studies Web siteThis is the eleventh in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Daniel Pinkerton on the 2006 Center for Austrian Studies Web site redesign

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
We had two reasons: First, the Center for Austrian Studies hadn't changed the appearance or the organization of the site since it was first designed and implemented in 1996. That's TEN years. Second, CLA-OIT wanted to design new websites for everyone that would have some features in common with other CLA websites. We were one of the first units to get help from them, because we are so small and our website is relatively simple.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
None.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
Gary Cohen, CAS director, myself, and CLA-OIT Web Development's Paul Coroneos and Karen Bencke (now Swoverland) had a series of meetings to talk about what everyone wanted in a design and the best organization for the material we needed to put on the web. Paul, in particular, had great design sense and was very good at translating our ideas into a clean, attractive, user-friendly design. Karen was a facilitator and also made sure that the necessary visual and verbal material was included --- wordmarks, EO wording, what have you. Gary and I worked on the content, though I have training and experience as a designer, so I was also a part of that process. And Gary had to keep an eye out for the Center's image and its worldwide constituency.

Interview: CEHD Web site redesign

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CEHD Web siteThis is the tenth in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Susan Andre and Nuria Sheehan on the College of Education and Human Development Web site redesign

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
It really had been pretty clear that the site was overdue for a redesign. The last redesign had been in 2001 and since that time not only had Web standards evolved, but CEHD also drastically changed, becoming a new college.

The primary goal in redesigning the site was to create a straightforward, intuitive structure and design for our audiences. A secondary goal was to be able to implement not only the actual site, but also an internal overall process that could be flexible and agile in order adapt to new types of content or update easily with changing Web standards. An important part of this flexibility involved creating content dynamically driven by our blogs or other applications.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
User testing was very important to us in this process and we did testing on terminology, homepage concepts, and overall wireframe usability. Because we identified the primary purpose of the site as a tool for recruiting and retaining students, most of the testing focused on student content.

We first completed the terminology testing with the Usability Lab last summer. Then, when students were back on campus, we did the homepage concept testing at the CEHD block party. We surveyed students, faculty, and staff on three distinct concepts for the homepage splash module: academic departments (focusing on the disciplines within each department), people (highlighting CEHD students, faculty, and alumni), and history (which showed the historic advances at the U in the areas of education and human development alongside current innovations). From this survey we received over 130 responses with the "people" concept getting the most votes.

When we had completed wireframes, we did the usability testing with the Usability Lab. From that testing we found that the overall structure was working well and which specific areas needed to be reworked.


I've had the pleasure of co-hosting two social media brown baggers for Forum members, and the events have been just like I thought they'd be. We have some stellar early adopters here at the U, and they are enormously generous in sharing what they know and how they did it. And we have a lot of people who are wondering where in the world to start. When I look at The Conversation Prism, I can understand why.

The Conversation Prism was designed by Brian Solis and Jesse Thomas in 2008 to "provide a visual representation of the true expansiveness of the Social Web and the conversations that define it." They've since updated their graphic, and one look at their beautiful, rainbow flower of possibilities can strike fear into the heart of the part-time communicator who has, like, five minutes a week to focus on social media for her program.

A repeating question at the brown bags has been, if you think you need social media, "what do you want to get out of it?" And the Conversation Prism does a nice job of ordering our communications methods and priorities, placing Brand at the center.

Social media can be intimidating, and as the Prism so clearly shows us, the possibilities are endless and astounding--blog? Facebook? Flickr? Why? And as long as new sites and services are created and old ones fall out of favor (Friendster, anyone?) this will continue to be a fluid subject. Luckily, with a little guidance from the Conversation Prism and a lot of advice from your fellow communicators, we have the means to wrestle social media to the ground and make it do our bidding.

The next social media brown bag will be on Friday, May 21 in 202 Johnston Hall.

Monday link roundup 4.12.10

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Here are a few links swirling around at the MinneWebCon conference today.

 

Keynote, Kristina Halvorson, CEO of Brain Traffic, gave a great talk about Web content. Here is the link to Brain Traffic's blog: http://blog.braintraffic.com.

Geek Girls: http://www.geekgirlsguide.com/

For the second keynote Wendy Chisolm spoke about accessibility: http://sp1ral.com/

 

Did any other Forum members go to MinneWebCon? If so, post any additional links you jotted down!

Interview: Giving to the U of M Web site redesign

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Giving Web site This is the ninth in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: A team effort! Glen Beltt, Christina Morgan, Mike Peluso, Todd Proctor, and Karl Raschke on the Giving to the U of M Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
Our team had a few main goals. Above all, we needed to more effectively highlight the terrific multimedia features being created within the Foundation that show donors what their gifts are helping to achieve. To do that, we included a jQuery content rotator that's working pretty well so far. Incidentally, we'd love to share our multimedia content with other units around the U through Media Mill or whatever other means is most convenient to use as appropriate within their own sites .

In addition, we wanted to update the Giving site in various ways: to strengthen our continuity with the University by using the new templates, to modernize the visual look of the site, and to update the code to make it more semantic and accessible using tableless CSS and clean HTML. Those changes have made the site easier to maintain as well. Also, we implemented Dreamweaver templating for the first time.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
Mostly we ended up relying on the "Rule of Common Sense." Because we overhauled our site in phases, and had to work in the redesign between a lot of other projects, we're doing our research and testing more after the fact, primarily through informal feedback and review of our Google Analytics stats, which we use extensively. We've recently learned about some interesting usability tools that we're beginning to test out.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
Aside from the need to highlight multimedia content, we took a lot of our cues from the University templates. Our navigation and other aspects of our information architecture were already pretty well settled and appeared to be working well. One challenge, to which we're still refining our response, is how to best take advantage of the wider view port. We were optimized for 800x600 before, but now we're up to 960 wide. We've added a narrow right column to most pages, and we're gradually developing ideas for how to use the extra space. The 960 width provides some nice multimedia options, too.

Interview: Alumni Association Web site redesign

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Alumni Association Web siteThis is the eighth in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Forum member Chris Coughlan Smith on the Alumni Association Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
Some aspects of our old site were not user friendly and the CMS was not able to handle updates and interactive features that Web users have come to expect. Our old look was dated - essentially the same as it had been since 2001 with only minor updates to our CSS when we went through branding.

What kind of user research or user testing did you do?
We had done extensive surveys and focus groups as part of the branding research, and then we did more focus groups with campus constituents and partners. As we refined our site structure we did some quick online navigation testing and then a round of usability testing with the Usability Lab. Both were extremely helpful. I'd highly recommend building in a few weeks to test and revamp your site before launch.

What factors went in to the organization of the site?
We hired a design firm to come up with an information architecture that made sense to an outside user. At the same time we had a number of strong branding personality concepts that we wanted to include. The outside firm helped us refine categories and sort our major areas of information and do the testing.

April Fools Day roundup

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Topeka nee GoogleIn which I refuse to allow my distaste for April Fools Day spoil everyone else's fun.


Please add your favorite April Fools links in the comments!

Interview: Electrical and Computer Engineering Web site

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Electrical and Computer Engineering Web siteThis is the seventh in a several-part series of interviews with communicators who have redesigned or updated their Web sites with the University templates. If you have redesigned your site or have a site to suggest for these interviews, let us know.

In this edition: Forum member Paula Beck on the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Web site

What were your reasons for redesigning the site?
A dated look, out of date information, difficult to navigate, and a lack of branding compliance.

  1. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering values the University of Minnesota brand and desires to be associated with the messages it carries. Our university brand delivers messages of a worldwide respected leader in research, a quality educational experience, and an organization that values and respects diversity.
  2. The department's communications function became centralized with the creation of a communications coordinator position. We are now able to assure a Web site with continuous, up-to-date content maintenance and user-friendly, clean design.
What kind of user research or user testing did you do?

  1. Viewed a number of University of Minnesota sites as well as sites from other major universities with Electrical and Communications departments.
  2. Asked staff, faculty and students for suggestions.
  3. Tested site with OIT staff, identified outside communications professionals, students, staff and faculty before the site went live.
  4. Six months after the site was built, we surveyed users for feedback.
  5. We wanted to do a usability testing; however the bid we received was well beyond our budget.

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