Recently in Workshops Category

Formatting Your Dissertation in Microsoft Word

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Over the last couple of years, librarians who teach workshops have made a point of trying to capture at least one recording of a workshop on video so that people who can't attend a workshop have some way of getting the instruction they need. These recorded workshops have been quite popular. In particular, students have viewed clips of the Formatting Your Dissertation (or Thesis) in Microsoft Word workshop hundreds of times.

When the time came this winter to record a new version to match the current version of Microsoft Word, we decided to take a different approach. This workshop is particularly "modular" and students often need help with just one or two things at a time. We'd previously handled that by cutting up the recording into pieces and posting each piece in a section of our Moodle page. This time around, we've created a set of tutorials that match the workshop in content, but are designed for individual computer-based instruction. Each describes a Graduate School formatting requirement or a Word feature you're likely to need and allows you to click the right menu and dialog box selections to format a sample document.
















Winter Workshops in Walter

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Walter Library is hosting a week of workshops to kick-off the new year and give you the research advantage. Each session is free to register and held in Walter Library.

Mon, 01/10/2011 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 314 Walter Library
Register for this Course (Faculty and staff members encouraged)

Mon, 01/10/2011 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Tue, 01/11/2011 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Tue, 01/11/2011 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Wed, 01/12/2011 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Thu, 01/13/2011 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Fri, 01/14/2011 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 310 Walter Library
Mon, 01/24/2011 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Tue, 01/25/2011 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Tue, 01/25/2011 - 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Register for this Course

January Workshops for Grad Students

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Our Winter Break Workshops in Walter are designed specifically for graduate students in the sciences and engineering. They are free and open to anyone; just register by following the links below each event. Many more workshops are also available throughout the University Libraries, see a full list here.

Introduction to Citation Managers
Tue, 01/05/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 101 Walter Library
Instructor(s): Meghan Lafferty
Capacity: 50
Status: Open
Thu, 01/07/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Mon, 01/11/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Tue, 01/12/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Instructor(s): Jon Jeffryes
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Wed, 01/13/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Wed, 01/13/2010 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Instructor(s):
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Thu, 01/14/2010 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Instructor(s): Janet Fransen
Capacity: 17
Status: Open
Register for this Course
Recorded workshop is available in two parts
Online resources are available

Excel for Engineers

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WatershedSpreadsheet.jpg
Next week I'm teaching a workshop called Excel for Engineers and Scientists. I taught a similar workshop at the instructor's request for a Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering class last winter, and have been eager to try it again as an open workshop. I'll be teaching primarily about using Visual Basic for Applications to interact with Excel.

In the BBE class, I showed them how to solve a particular watershed problem from their homework. I could use more good engineering examples. If you've got one, or if you've got suggestions about what engineers should know about using Excel, I'd love to hear from you. Email me, or leave a comment.

Academic Bread and Butter

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If you are a graduate student or a faculty member, research is likely your primary focus. But you know that to continue to do the research you love, you need to develop two important skills: getting grants and publishing the results of your research.

Next week, librarians at Walter Library will be offering two workshops designed for graduate students and early-career faculty:

  • Monday, 10/19 (1:30-2:30) Getting Published: How to Publish Your Science Research Article will help you identify journals to consider when submitting your article and discuss how to manage your rights when signing a contract with a publisher.
  • Tuesday, 10/20 (3:00-4:15) Grant Funding - Search Tools and Resources introduces you to searching for grant opportunities with IRIS, SPIN, and Community of Science and the Foundation Directory. You'll learn to set up email updates on specific subjects, as well as find out about internal U of M funding sources.

We hope to record these sessions. If you can't attend, check our Tutorials and Recorded Workshops page next week. If we're successful, you'll see these workshops on that page by the end of next week.

Tutorials and Recorded Workshops

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TutorialsRecordedWorkshops.jpg We love our Workshop Series here at the Libraries, but we know that many of you aren't on campus during the day, or just can't find the time to come over to Walter Library for a class. Therefore we're adding as many online instruction options as possible. Our Tutorials and Online Workshops page lists three kinds of instruction, all available wherever you have your computer and an Internet connection:
  • Online Tutorials are short and targeted to specific tasks, like setting up a Refworks account or searching for books in MNCAT Plus.
  • Recorded workshops are recordings of the walk-in workshops we teach in the library. We just turn on the recording software and capture the screen and our voices.
  • Online Self-Paced Workshops are mostly Moodle pages. They typically contain the slides and handouts we use for the walk-in workshops, screenshots and how-tos for specific tasks, and links to additional resources on the topic.
Let me know if there are topics you'd like to see us cover, either as online instruction or walk-in workshops.

Workshops @ Walter Sept 28-Oct 2

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My fellow engineering librarian Jon Jeffryes' knack for finding great Creative Commons images for blog posts never fails to impress me. He claims to love doing this, so I'm not even going to feel guilty about copying and pasting his weekly-or-so posts about our upcoming workshops. Thanks Jon!

Here's a list of library workshops coming up next week at Walter Library. If you have any questions or would like more information about any of the offerings, send me an email.


Create Posters Using PowerPoint
Poster Show.jpg
(Image comes from ragesoss via Flickr. CC)

We'll give you the tools to make a classy poster for your next presentation--be it in class, at a conference or a departmental meeting. We'll show you how to use PowerPoint to create a poster as one giant slide that can be easily sent to a large-scale printer. We'll also provide you with some best practices in designing your poster so that you have an eye-catching document that's easy to understand.

Monday, September 28
1:30-2:15
Walter Library 310

Web Tools For Working Collaboratively

Collaboratively.jpg

An introduction and overview of great online collaborative tools that you can use in your work with colleagues...whether they're across the ocean or across the hall.

Tuesday, September 29
1:30-2:30
Walter Library 310

Engineering: Find Better Information Faster

Engineering Information.jpg
(Image from Calistobreeze via Flickr. CC).

In this workshop we'll give you an overview and some hands-on experience finding quality engineering research. We'll discuss finding peer-reviewed journal articles from Engineering Village and Web of Science as well as searching for more technical information in patent and standards databases.

Wednesday, September 30
2:30-3:30
Walter Library 310

For more, or to register for any workshop, visit our website.

Can't make it to Walter? Check out our growing list of tutorials, recorded workshops, and self-paced workshops.

Google Scholar is Your Friend

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Last week Jon Jeffryes and I taught a Google for Researchers workshop. The outline of this particular workshop has always been fluid--we change it whenever Google releases something new that we think students, faculty, and staff will find useful. This time, at Jon's suggestion, we put eight possible topics up on the screen and asked the students to use clickers to vote on what we should cover first. Top vote-getter in the first round: Google Scholar. Most people had heard of it, but didn't know how it differed from using the main Google search.

Google Scholar is similar to the databases licensed by University Libraries in that it indexes scholarly articles from publishers and societies with whom it has relationships. Google Scholar also indexes scholarly articles and technical reports from other places, like institutional repositories and departmental websites at colleges and universities. I've seen articles from both the University Digital Conservancy and the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory pop up on Google Scholar.

Google Scholar doesn't have the rich search tools found in licensed databases. You won't find faceted search tools where you can click on terms to quickly filter a search. Even the advanced search form is quite limited. But Google Scholar really shines when you have a full or partial citation you need to track down, when you're looking for paper from a conference proceedings or a technical report, or when you want to see the preprint version of a not-yet-published article.

Like licensed databases, Google Scholar sometimes links directly to the full text of the articles it indexes. Often, though, you'll only get to see an abstract. Don't despair--if University Libraries has access to the article, you're only a couple of clicks away from reading it. The only trick is to make sure Google Scholar knows you're affiliated with the University of Minnesota.
GoogleSchoarlFindIt.jpg

Jon posted instructions on how to "turn on" the FindIt@U of M Twin Cities link a few months back. If you're using Google Scholar and not seeing the link, take a couple of minutes to follow the steps Jon's laid out.