PCMC Meeting

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Notes from the PCMC meeting on September 23, 2009, "Change Best Practices: Minimizing Resistance to Change" presented by Nan Gesche Larsen.

  • Change in our personal life focuses on the positive: new house, marriage, having a baby, etc.
  • Change in work life skews negative: job loss, more responsibility, etc.
  • Bad change experiences make us resistent to future change.
  • Change will affect productivity. Try to squeeze personal time rather than social time. Like Google and General Mills, employers provide all manner of personal services to reduce the amount of time employees spend getting haircuts, getting oil changes, driving to day-care and what not.
  • If you attempt to squeeze social time you cut off a necessary release valve. Provide good information so social time isn't spent speculating or stirring the pot.
  • With change you can pay now or you can pay later but you will pay in productivity.
  • If hand-holding and cheerleading activities seem silly to upper management, translate loss of productivity into dollars.
  • Engage people in decision making. Maybe they can't weigh in on the larger decisions but let them rule over the small stuff.
  • Get creative and find ways to engage.
  • The FUD factor = fear uncertainty doubt
  • Responding to change is not an steady continuum but it is predictable. There will be dips and struggles. Work to lessen their length and severity.
  • Don't forget that starting something new means ending something old. As humans we form attachments to processes and routines. Celebrate and ritualize the death of the old. Sound hokey? Perhaps, but it's still meaningful and cathartic.
  • Mismanaging change can produce a toxic atmosphere long after the change takes place.
  • Remember that it's often more important to be heard than agreed with.
  • We can understand the need for change on an intellectual level but resistence comes from the emotional part. Find ways to deal with emotions.

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The change continuum via Nan Gesche Larsen:

Awareness
Understanding
Buy-In
Ownership
Behavior Change