« March 2008 | Main | May 2008 »

April 28, 2008

Louis Adams Project 2

Download file

I chose to remake the one on one rematch scene between Omar Epps (man) and Sanaa Lathan (woman). I decided to play both of the characters in this scene. I also chose to have Tsinu be the cameraman for my project because I knew that he would know a lot abut how to use the camera and what I meant if I were to say use the 180 degree rule for a certain set of shots.
Shooting this scene took a lot of dedication due to the difficulties that arose. The first day we went into the gym it was 8 am and we filmed until almost 1 pm. The entire film was ruined because the camera was on the wrong setting. Therefore we had to go back into the gym the next day at 7 to refilm.
Tsinu and I went into the gym with the set plan that we were going to film all of on character’s parts and then film all of the other character’s parts. We decided that since most of the shots had Lathan in it we would shoot her part first. I know basketball very well and I know that games don’t get too intense until close to the end so I chose not to do a lot of cuts back and forth to show that there was not much tension in the beginning.
In the middle of the scene when Epps gets the ball, the scene starts to take an emotional turn. I chose to use a different set of angles for the shots to show this idea of feeling and emotion.
After the man makes his third shot, things start to get real emotional. For this reason I decided to take certain shots with a lot of physical emotion and slow it down to show a sense of connection between the two characters. I also chose to use a lot of cuts during this time to show the intensity in emotion between the two. In case you never heard the song, “Fool of Me? by India Arie, I’ll tell you that the one I used in my video was greatly modified. Since my seen was a lot shorter than the original, I had to cut the track down by splitting it in different spots but on the same beat and meshing them together. I had to do this because the tone of the song changes with the tone of the video and I had to match it up correctly.

Visiting Artist Response: Trisha Brown

My Visiting Artist Response is done on Trisha Brown, one of the most important modern dance pioneer, dancer, choreographer, and artist. She is one of the artists that was most noticed during the postmodern era alongside with other famous choreographer such as Yvonne Rainer and Steve Paxton, and is considered one of the experimental choreographers who showcased her work in the emerging Judson Group. Her fascination with the limits of her body and use of different spaces and defying and cooperating with gravity, led to her many unique creations that to this day stands out in the dance world.
This year in the dance world in the Twin Cities, it is hailed as the Year of Trisha, with a reconstruction of Set and Reset/Reset by the University of Minnesota dance students that summarizes the classic Trisha Brown movement vocabulary, live drawing performance by Trisha herself of So the Audience Does Not Know When I Have Stopped Dancing, the reconstruction of Planes exhibition at the walker that runs through July 20, and a performance by the Trisha Brown Dance Company at the Northrop Auditorium on University of Minnesota campus.
Currently I’m a part of her reconstruction Planes that is at exhibition at the Walker Art and I had the opportunity to meet her and rehearse with her. Although she is not known as a visual artists, she has collaborated with many, and Planes in particular is a multi-media live performance exhibition that will interest different spectrum of artists. The installation consists of a 20 ft tall wall with holes the size of a person’ hand located all over the fall. Each performance includes 3 performers that move at the speed of tai chi, which combined with the video projection of aerial view of cities and images that give discombobulated feel to the viewer. The performers wear a two panel colored jumpsuit which depending on which side the performers are climbing on the wall, will either blend in with the wall, or stand out of the wall giving a tumbling sensation to any gazer’s eye.
The installation was a progressive one, first with the experimentation of the body at a vertical wall, that led to images of climbers rolling on plane, to a falling image that is enhanced with the visual projection. The piece being 17 minutes long, it is exhausting as a performer. Because as a dancer I am used to going with or against gravity, to appear as though gravity does not exist was a new challenge. Rather than when letting a limb go on the wall, it is important not to immediately let gravity take over, but to pretend as if you were in space yourself, hence when I let go an arm, dropping it vertically would ruin the illusion.
I have several opportunities to watch the installation myself and the illusion that the art piece was able to project was pretty amazing.

Final Project Proposal

For my final project, I would like to attempt to film my senior piece I have created for my Senior Seminar class. It is a 9 minute dance piece that was created based on the inspiration of home, and rather than filming it through the lens of audience and performer line, I want to experiment methods to draw the viewer closer to the dance. The traditional way of filming at the line of audience and performer, video tends to strip all ornaments such as costumes and lighting and makes the dance seem bare. To avoid that, I would have to film close-ups throughout the dance, and focus more on the emotional side of dancers.
I’m hoping for a miracle that there is a sunny day that ALL of my seven dancers can meet together, but I plan to shoot this by the park next to the Guthrie Theater where there is a hill and pathways which I think it would be scenic and perfect for my piece. I would like to try long shots and close-ups from multiple angels so the dance would have to be done several times. Before I talked about inserting images, but I don’t think I will do that anymore. Hopefully I could do this at one shot.

April 24, 2008

DVD Studio Pro Tutorials

Apple Final Cut Studio - DVD Studio Pro Tutorials
http://www.apple.com/finalcutstudio/tutorials/#tab=fcstudio&tutorial=mov-dvdoverview

Green Screen tutorials

After Effects Green Screen Tutorial
http://philipwilliams.com/greenscreen.aspx

Final Cut Pro Green Screen Tutorial
A basic tutorial

Tutorial: Chroma in Video (Final Cut Pro)
A more involved tutorial

April 23, 2008

Ivory Tower

If anyone is interested in doing something this Friday evening...

The Ivory Tower is the University of Minnesota's undergraduate literature magazine. They take submissions in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, artwork, and cross-genre work. The launch party for this year's issue is on Friday and...

I will be reading my poem! Plus you will get to see/hear a lot of interesting work from other people. PLUS there is free dessert afterwards.

It's from 7-9 pm on the West Bank in Anderson Library. Yeah!

Stephen Grothem-Visiting Artist

The work Found Voice, Solo Museum by Abinadi Meza is a very interesting take on the museum as a public space, and as a space that lives and breathes whether the public is there or not. As one enters the space, it is immediate as to how dark it is. The first thing I noticed was the sound, sort of an overwhelmingly creepy sort of noise. I was also drawn to the vitrines because I wanted to see what was in them. Imagine my surprise when there was nothing but sound. I love the idea of displaying sound in a traditional sense like a vitrine. The space it is in gives me the idea of it being trapped inside, and the vitrine being a metaphor for the walls of the museum. Hence the sound is trapped in the museum, echoes of the past. Once the initial darkness subsides, I was drawn to the large projection, or what I thought was one of the greatest horror films I have seen in a while. The suspense the piece builds is incredible, always keeping me on edge. i doubt very much that this was one of the intentions of Mr. Meza but I think it actually works for the piece. The suspense, if that is what you want to call it, reminds me of a trip to the museum in general, as you move from room to room not really knowing what each has in store for you.
What really impressed me about the piece was the wonderful sense of motion you got, something which is rare in a museum where is is usually so still. This motion adds to the identity of the museum as something that is breathing and alive. To me the whole projection seemed it was the museum at night haunted by its daytime patrons from the past, suggesting that the spirit of the visitor never really leaves the place due to their own experience. These unique personal experiences linger in the museum and stay there forever.
The one thing I wished about the piece was that it were a bit larger in scope. I think a large work could have shown off the sheer scope of the museum, something I always find interesting when at a gallery. The size can affect how personal the experience become and how much you find yourself lost in the museum. Overall, a truly fascinating work and one that I should like to explore further.

Sarah Vang: Visiting Artist Response

Although I attended Matt Ryle’s visiting artist lecture, I feel I can write more about the trip to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and Abinadi Meza’s installation.

Abinadi Meza was born in Chicago in 1976. He graduated with a Master’s degree from the University of Minnesota. The main media he uses in his artwork is audio and sound.

His installation at MIA was composed of three vitrines of sound and two videos, one of which was played on a small monitor and the other projected against a wall accompanied with sound. All of the art displayed was created at the museum. The sounds were captured with microphones in the galleries, and the video was shot at night while the museum was closed.

As I said in our discussion, the whole thing made me feel like a ghoul or an entity that was not living or dead. I sat and watched the whole video play, drifting in and out with the camera and focusing on the beam of light because it was the only thing that I could make out in the darkness of everything else. Even the sound that played while I watched made me feel detached from the world. This was the reason why I felt like a ghoul; it was almost beyond my control to focus in and see the whole picture of the world (or rather, the museum). I was aware of time passing because of the movement from the Egyptians, to the art of the East, to the ancient Greek and Roman statues, to the art of the 1800s; but unaware of where I was. It was almost a struggle to focus on something both visually and with hearing. I didn’t know where the world started and where it ended because the beam of light moved in a way that could have suggested the space was endless, leaving me to imagine what was beyond what I could see. The whole installation gave me a different feeling. He was able to capture time in such a way to make a person feel like they were not a person at all. It was a different experience, and I enjoyed it.

The presentation itself was well done. The sound vitrines were placed in isolated areas of the installation space. There was nothing in it, yet there was light illuminating it in the darkness of the room, and there was even a pedestal as if displaying a beautiful work of visual art. As you lean in and listen to the sound in the vitrines, you begin to realize that there is art trapped within the clear walls. I was led from the monitor on the wall to each vitrine. The video was the last thing that caught my eye, and it was what brought the whole space together. The video played on the monitor was isolated; there was no sound. The sound in the vitrines was isolated; there was no visual. The projected video was a combination of both: sound of the museum as well as a darker video of it.

“I am interested in the museum as a social organism. The idea of a public museum fascinates me as a corrective to social alienation and a place of historical reflection. The sounds you hear were recorded in the galleries, public spaces, and maintenance areas of the museum. They are paired with video images of empty rooms and isolated artifacts in order to connect the ongoing energy of the living with the static energy of the past.?

I copied this quote from the only lighted wall of the installation space. As I read it, I realized that what a museum does is bring together the past and the present. It brought me back to the thought of being a ghoul because ghouls live forever, stuck in a specific state but living through time.

TSINU- Artist Response

My visit to the MIA was the first of its kind. I have never been to a museum of that size. So, I wasn’t really sure what to expect. From the moment I walked in, the quietness, the size of the room and many interesting paintings and crafts hanging all over the place caught my attention. In all honestly, the couple of times I have been to some type of exhibition or a museum, I have found it to be extremely boring and uninteresting. However, this time it was different. The varieties of things presented in different exhibition rooms have something to offer for everyone. As I walked around the big museum before getting to my final destination, I have come across many interesting pieces I would love to take time and look at. From ancient classic art forms to contemporary, the museum is decorated with a collection of fine arts
What made my trip an absolute new experience is the sound and video exhibition by Artist Abinadi Meza. For most of us, the idea of a museum consists of old paintings and 16 century statues. However, one look at Abinadi Meza’s presentation will change your perception instantly. I know it changed mine. The minute I walked into the dark room my ears could ear loud noises before my eyes could see anything. This changes the whole notion of going to an art museum, as most of us go expecting to see something rather than hearing it. The sound is overwhelming and coming from every direction. I was forced to stop and try to identify the many sounds coming off the speakers. But when I looked at the projected image on the wall, it made it possible for me to identify the sounds little by little. As we see a person walking around with a flash light in the empty museum, we hear the sound of a large crowed. Possibly the kind of crowed you would find in any museum. It sort of gave me a spooky feeling as I understood the sound to be traces of the many people who visited this museum over the years. I found Abinadi Meza’s work very appealing because it made me feel like I was part of the shows as the camera and the flash light seem to move from the audience’s perspective.
In comparison, Richard Rock’s work portrays the same type of message. But he presents it in a totally different way. His work, even though interesting, it’s what you typically would expect to find in a museum. They are paintings of things you would find if you take the time to walk around in the very museum you’re in. However, I didn’t get the same type of feeling I got looking at Abinadi’s work. Even though they both tried to recreate the feeling of being in a museum, Abinadi’s work I believe was much more successful in drawing me in as audience than Richard Rock’s pieces. Over all, it was a very pleasant experience and I will be sure to go back some time soon.

April 22, 2008

Louis Adams - MIA Response

This is my first time actually writing a response to an art institution. I am not quit sure if this is what you are looking for but this is what I thought about it. When I first entered the museum with Tsinu, I had a perception that it wasn’t that big. We got there a little before the rest of the class did but we didn’t know if you all were there yet so we walked around. The Minnesota Institution of Art was ten times bigger than I thought it was. Hence, walking around gave me the opportunity to see almost everything that was in the whole institution. After almost one and a half walk through, we finally found the rest of the class.

As I walked into the dark room I saw three or four little cases lit from the ceiling. They had little speakers stuck to them. There were creepy whisper/ mumble sounds echoing in the room. There was also a little 4 inch monitor showing a camera following a lit flash light. At first I didn’t know what it was so I continued to walk further in. There was a bench that the rest of the class was sitting on watching the same thing from the little screen except it was being shown on the big black wall. I then sat down to have this experience with them.

As I started to watch the film a lot more closely I began to realize that it was of a person walking around the MIA with a flashlight looking at all of the paintings. The entire film was extremely long because it is solely about this camera following a flashlight around the large MIA building. If it weren’t for the sounds I wouldn’t have wanted to even stay in the room because it was so boring.

The best part about this experience was the fact that I could relate to the movie in the sense that I had already seen everything that was being shown in the wall. It almost felt as though I was in the film. The room almost felt like the entire museum to me because I had seen a lot of the things before in the daylight and now it was like I was doing it all again only in the dark. I also liked how the paintings in the other room were of the paintings in the museum.

April 21, 2008

Louis Adams - Project 3 Proposal

I have had this creative idea running through my head for a long time, but never had a chance to actually put it into action. For my final project I am going to remake my own scene from Frankenstein. For my scene I will have to find a way to make a laboratory so that I can create my monster. For the longest time I have had this idea in my head that I wanted to recreate a scene from Frankenstein and make it an intro video in a step show for my fraternity. Never have I just done it though. Now is the time!

I envision that my scene will go in a certain order. Hopefully it works out. I will have someone play Dr. Frankenstein, Igor, and the monster. I want the whole thing to be a voice over done by the voice of Dr. Frankenstein. First, Dr. Frankenstein will be introduced as he puts his lab coat on and other equipment for the lab. As he makes his journey to the lab the voice over will be introducing the project of his monster. During this whole time, Dr. Frankenstein’s face will not be seen.

Next, he will enter his lab and as the light turns on his face will be shown in a creepy way. After that I will have Igor being introduced into the scene by bringing the doctor his tools for the experiment. This is when I will have the monster introduced. I will have a cover over his whole body and the doctor will pull it off so the supposed dead monster’s face can be shown.

This is where the experiment will begin. I will have Dr. Frankenstein performing an operation on the monster when he tries different things to make him come to life. This is where the project has a little laughter. I want the doctor to put different things into the monster’s body to make him come to life. However, I will use other fraternity’s symbols to do this. These things will not work for making him come to life. The Dr. then goes crazy and comes up with an idea. He thinks of a cane (my fraternity symbol) and then puts it in the monster and then he comes to life. I will add different effects from final cut to make this very theatrical. I plan on using an old room for this project because it will have to look like a lab.

Project Two: Dancer in the Dark - 107 steps








Breanne Subias: Project 2

Download file

When I first began thinking about my project, I intended to make as faithful a representation of the original as I could with my resources. The more I thought about it, however, the less the scene meant to me and the more I put it off. I felt nothing when I went off to film some mandatory blurb about cowboys. I was entirely uninterested in my own project. I originally wanted to do the scene from “The Office? that I presented in class, because aside from the fact that it made someone I know cry, it also made a lot of sense to me because of an experience I was having in my own life that I felt would have compelled me to put a lot of myself into it (I essentially secured my Jim that week…if this allusion is beyond you, you are missing out). I was not so much excited about giving that up for cowboys.
After I figured out I was never going to meaningfully connect with my character in his original form , I modernized/urbanized my concept into what I call the “businesswoman version? of my scene. I filmed it in my own living space, used professional clothing instead of outdoor attire, a postcard of a city skyline rather than a mountain range, and a window overlooking the view of cars going down a city road to preserve the symbolism of the original road running through fields (i.e. the message that everything keeps on going). Although I changed the scenery, I tried to keep the camera angles as similar as possible. For example, I made sure the hallway in my version ran at the same angle as the outside of the trailer in the original.
While shooting, I tried to stay true to the original number of camera angles, but ended up with 8 instead of the 6 that we agreed were okay. This was mostly due to the limited area and orientation of the door, closet, and window within the room where I was shooting. I had to split up a couple of scenes because they moved from the door to the closet and the closet to the window, but the room wasn’t arranged in a way that made that gracefully possible. Aside from an Extreme Home Makeover, this was the best option. Since the trailer from the original is darkly lit but for natural lighting, I decided to forgo extra lights and use natural lighting in mine as well, instead shooting my scene over three days between the hours of 7 and 8:30 am.
While my final project falls far from my original intent, I am happy for having been able to overcome my lack of enthusiasm to come up with what I did. One area I would change if I had more time would be the song in the background. It is in itself iconic, so I would not altogether replace it with a more setting-appropriate piece. What I would really have liked to do would be to record myself just playing the bare chords and humming the melody of the piece. I just thought of that this evening, but it would have added a more appropriate audio element that would still be recognizable from the original. I also wish I could have figured out a way to more accurately crop my shots, as well as timed my scene more accurately to the original.

TSINU-Final Project Proposal

I decided to change my project. i wanted to try something that might seem easy from a visual perspective. However, is something that can be used to critique society in this day and age. I'm going to shoot a short clip not more than 2 or 3 minutes. In the take I plan to have three or 4 people possibly with a mixture or men and women and also people from different ethnicity. We are living in a world where there is so much hate and violence. I have always wanted to make some type of documentary that talk about love and unity. Even though this project is by no means as big as a documentary, I want it to have the same type of powerful message.

Everyday so many horrible things are that happening in our world. Ever time you turn on the TV, listen to the radio, get online or read a magazine, its always talking about some type of terror. People are scared to leave their own house or talk to their neighbors because of all the terrible things you hear around you. So, that makes me want to ask this question? Where is our society going to? Is our world going to turn into a place where every one lives for him/her self? World is getting smaller and smaller by the minute, but people are hiding from one another just fast. We are living in a world where people can have hundreds of "Facebook" friends they have never met in person, while they don't know the name of their next door neighbor who has been living there for 10 years.

I want to make a video clip that criticizes today's technology driven society. We are all so wrapped up in our own small world, so focused on on our own small problems, sometimes we fail to see there is a big world out there full of people. I want to bring people from different background and race in this small project and have them talk about the same thing in a why that emphasizes that we all want the same thing in life. This is Love, peace and health.

Stephen Project 2 Video

Download file

Project 2 - Katherine Lung

https://mediamill.cla.umn.edu/mediamill/embedqt/10322

April 20, 2008

freesound project

http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/index.php

April 18, 2008

Sable - Final Video Proposal

For my final project, I plan to do a mock-up of a video game called Counterstrike: Source. The reasons why I would like to do this are fairly straight-forward. On project 2, I focused on a video that required complicated shooting (i.e. scene cuts constantly, angles are more difficult, etc). In the video game (and how it will be in the shots as well) all the video is from a 1st person view. This means that [most] video will be shot from a shoulder mount. In contrast to the shooting becoming much easier, the editing will be much more difficult. In the style of the game, I will overlay frames on top of the video to resemble the HUD and other elements (example photos included below). The video will split between several character’s perspectives, but there will be significantly fewer cuts than what would ordinarily be in a movie.

Besides the overlays, I plan to use another trick: video in video. Though most of the story will be shown first person as if you were one of the characters in the game, I will include a third person perspective of an actual person playing the game at their computer. On the monitor they’re looking at I will playback video that is already edited for the movie so that it looks they’re actually controlling the characters. I think this will help add a bit to the level of humour since this will be intended as a parody.

The audio will be composed of sound bytes from the actual game as well as voices filtered through a microphone to imitate what player’s actual voices sound like when playing.

Shooting should be fairly simple. I will get 4 of my friends to act so that I can operate the camera. Because the game is based on two opposing sides (terrorists vs. counterterrorist’s), two of them will dress in SWAT gear and the other two will dress in camouflage with red headbands. The only props that will be needed are weapons (fake of course). I haven’t yet decided whether to use replicas or paintball guns… it will depend on what is more available when I go to shoot.

The plot (just like the game) will be relatively unimportant. What will be important are the specific elements I intend to parody. Those things are: someone leaving their keyboard when playing, the game “lagging? (people suddenly appearing 15 feet away from where they were), someone trash-talking, and someone exploiting a hole in the game logic.

If you find a part of this proposal (or maybe all of it, who am I to say) to be unacceptable, please send me a message (or mention it to me in class) and I can change part (or all) of it to your liking. Included below are screenshots of the game to give you an idea of what I’m going for.

Game pic 1

Game pic 2

Game pic 3

April 15, 2008

Alina Cheng Artist Response

I went to the “Found Voice? exhibit in the Minneapolis Institute of Art by Abinadi Meza. He works mostly with sound and video, traveling all over the world to record sounds to show them to people. He likes to record sounds of people because he feels that sounds are easily gone and forgotten so he wants to show people what was there. He had majored in poetry but went into art for a living.
The artist basically recorded the museum sounds from three different days, and filmed what the museum was at night in the dark. The exhibit had three sound vitrines and two projections. The vitrines were basically display stands with plexiglass surrounding the display stands and nothing in them. If you put your ear up to it, you could hear the sounds the artist recorded from the museum. You could hear voices, pipe rumblings and vents. The vitrines’ displays had nothing in them because he wanted to draw us in, to get us close enough to hear faint sounds coming from it, and eventually press our ears against the glass. The projections, one large and one small, showed the museum in the dark, where the only thing you could see was what the flashlight was on. He wanted to recreate a room through sound, and he did. When we walked into the gallery, it really felt like we were in the museum late at night. Once you walked into the gallery, there was a creepy feel because it was dark, and you heard all these ghostly sounds. The artist wanted the movie to be like a dream, because the projection showed all this darkness with random pretty or historically significant objects popping up. The artist didn’t want this to be like a normal movie- there’s no beginning, middle and end, just like a dream would be.
When the artist talked about why he chose to do this, I thought his comment about how a museum is a paradox was very interesting. He said that a museum is a public place, but we each have our own memories, experiences, and feelings in it. So even though it’s a public space, we are individuals in the space. Even though we are in the same place, the feelings we have are all different. I had never thought about museums in this way, and his comments about this made me think about museums in a different light.
When I first walked into the gallery, I didn’t really know what he was trying to do, because my first impressions of the gallery was that it was a creepy dark place with ghostly sounds everywhere- and where was the art in that? But after Meza’s talk, I realized that he want to capture parts of the museum never seen or heard- so the sounds that are gone instantly after they are made, and the museum in the dark. Basically, he was trying to capture what the museum is like the day before, because the next morning, it is as if there was never anyone there- all quiet and empty.

Breanne Subias, Visiting Artist Response

I'm not exactly sure this is the kind of "response" you were looking for, as the visiting artist response guidelines don't seem to be functioning (it could very well just be my junky computer, but the pdf opens and nothing is in it. I've tried several times). But anyway, the following is what resulted from simply following what is on the syllabus. I hope it is sufficient. If it isn't, I would appreciate it if you'd let me know (subi0007@umn.edu) so I can fix it.

Matt Ryle, April 10th, 2008

There were a multitude of things I could have picked to do on a Thursday night. A vast multitude in fact, aside from walking through flying ice shards to see some exposed tree-being with what looked to be an onion protruding from his rectum have sex with a mechanical part inside of a dead tree. I could have caught up on my reading, or cleaned, or cuddled in front of the long-anticipated first new episode of The Office since the writer’s strike (which I still have not watched). Imagine my delight when the esteemed Matt Ryle (who looks disturbingly like my uncle Todd) took the stage and told us to beware, what we were about to see was to be “fucked up.?

I guess out of all of the things that could have resulted from such an event, what did result wasn’t such a tragedy. Truth be told, I was actually pretty excited to find that my Thursday night, while remaining Office-less, would at least be entertaining. Before Ryle began talking, I knew nothing about the guy or any of his work. I had prepared myself to sit through something as horrendous as a lecture on cubism for several hours. But as humans would most likely all rather be exposed to glaring, phallic tree limbs and inebriated South American festivities than pictures of squares, I was elated to be in that room rather than the gallery next door.

The piece itself was interesting to me due to its management of a highly sexual content on a level that was not at all base or prurient. The sexualized elements were used less recreationally (or as gratuitous scandal) and more to get across the drive to create. The man who had sexual relations with the metal part carrying the tree, who was himself a very real part of the tree, took an interest in that metal part only when cotton fell from above and he realized he could use it to cover the metal. To me it seemed that he wanted badly to take this manmade intrusion and make it part of the tree. The seminal visual allusion near the end, where building tools appear from a dripping puddle of white liquid strengthens this hypothesis. I also got the feeling, throughout the piece, that the woman at the top of the tree and the man at the bottom were almost interacting sexually through the tree. The fact that she was pulling building materials to make her home in the tree from plastic phalluses atop the tree as the man was going about his business at the root, as well as the fact that the cotton with which the man builds comes from her, supports this.

Although I spent a good portion of the video itself confused, the round table discussion afterward helped me piece together some of the ideas I had about its meaning. One of the women at the round table discussion brought up a good point: what was up with the monkey? Ryle mentioned that the feces of monkeys may hold some special property in Brazilian myth, but what I gathered as I was watching was the fact that the tree-man was grasping at straws, reveling in anything organic and familiar in his bleak situation.

April 9, 2008

Matt W - Final Project

The idea for my video is still being formulated, but I have a strong urge to base the storyline around popular old actors, such as Woody Allen or Marlon Brando or Audrey Hepburn. I’m unsure as to whether I will make the characters seem as if they are within their own place in time or whether I will take their same characters out of their time periods and place them in another. I’m thinking the latter of the two would be very interesting and have a lot of options, as well as make it easier for each character to interact. The general idea that I have in my head working with all these characters is to make a movie about these characters all working on a movie together. So my video would seem almost like a documentary in a way because you would see a lot of the mistakes and production value side in the video.
Technical aspects that I know I will work with are largely the number of shots. Partly because I’m not sure how much action/interaction/excitement/etc. will come out of what is happening in the movie, so having a large number of shots to create interest will be important. Another reason I want to focus on shots is because I really saw how important and interesting shot variation is within just one scene, from doing our last project. I think that it adds a lot of interest, and like I said before, since I’m not exactly sure of the content in the video, I know I want to use shots as a key visual tactic for entertainment.
Another technical issue is going to be working with lighting. Since I plan on having my actual video have video footage shot as if another movie is going on within my video, then it will be important to make that evident. To use lighting in a way that distinguishes the movie footage from the other footage.
Another issue that I am concerned with is shot location and scene set-up. I would like the video to have a very “on-the-set? presence, but still be in more than just one location.

ashley final project

When I first thought of an idea for this project, I thought I wanted to establish a critique of the prescription drug industry. After a bit of thought, however, I decided I wanted to broaden the basis of my animation to comment on our consumer driven culture. Also, I’d like to subtly hint at the message of the animation rather than make it blatantly obvious.

I decided to work with collage animation again for this project because the last one was such a learning experience for me. I want to put some of the techniques I figured out into action for this project. I want to expand on what I learned from project 1 to create an animation that is more driven to a concrete goal. The major difference between the first project and this one is that for this animation I worked on a total whim. In other words, I had no idea where the animation would end up. I let my imagination guide me during the creation process. Now I have more of a layout of where I want the animation to go.

I also learned a lot about the technical aspect of making a collage animation. To make the movement of the characters and objects more realistic, I'm going to sew them together before I shoot. For example, if I have a person cutout, I would sew his/her joints together so they have more fluid, realistic movements. i also want to make use of rubber cement. In my first project, I found that i could apply a thin layer of rubber cement to the backs of the collage pieces to make them tacky. This helps to control the movement of the objects.

I'm using magazines from the 1970's. I want to create an animation that has the old/worn look of aged paper. I also want to use text. A crucial scene I want in the animation consists of a person visually talking, by which there is text coming out of their mouth. The words would be unrecognizable. They move to a black space and align themselves in a certain order. Then the space is filled with more letters/words so that the unrecognizable words become part of a larger paragraph. Then most of the words are blocked out with a sparpie marker, and a completely new message appears on the screen.

Stephen Final Project

The idea for my final project is actually a part of a larger idea I had for a film called the Lonely Bowler's Club.

I want to film a small segment from the film that describes the legend of the Lonely Bowler. So in a sort of dreamlike setting the bowler will become a legend even though he is simply a guy who likes to bowl. Over shots of the bowler doing his thing, I plan to use a voice over that describes how the man became a legend. I am not entirely sure on all the details of the legend yet, but would like it to be shrouded in enigma, for instance, his bowling shirt says Jim, but nobody actually knows his real name. I really would like to play around with the mystery surrounding all legends, and what those legends are actually like in reality. Of course he will have accomplished some miraculous feat, bowling 20 games in a row without stopping or something along those lines. Perhaps I will add an almost supernatural element, like even after closing when he is gone, people still hear bowling sounds from lane 2. I think it will be an interesting, non narrative one shot that deals with stories and tall tales.

Breanne Subias, Final Project Proposal

Concept about dreams where your teeth fall out, which is apparently the most frequently reported dream image. Read on.

For my final project, I plan to illustrate a short story through the use of shadows, much like the video “Paranoland? I found on youtube. I’m actually fairly sure it’s done completely differently, but I’m going to attempt to create a similar feeling using shadows and crepe paper. I was thinking of rigging up some sort of contraption that would include a layer of colored crepe paper, a layer of clear plastic below that on which to move the shadow figures, and a light source coming up below that. It will be partially in quick-moving stop motion and partially told through pictures in a style a la “La Jete,? which I’m sure I just spelled like a moron. I will attempt to control my white balance this time.

Actually, scratch the short story idea. I’m going to base this things content off of the most common reported and one of the most disturbing dream images for some people, including myself, which is the dream of losing teeth. I looked up a little about the significance of losing teeth, and the image is rooted in appearance anxiety, fear of sexual impotence or inferiority, fear of embarrassment, powerlessness/lack of confidence, and a faith in man instead of God. I will use a silhouette of a female face shape that will have a set number of teeth, and as the teeth fall out, I will use the shadows to illustrate this insecurity.

Now that I’m thinking about this, this concept might be better suited for a college/stop motion project. I'm on a roll for scratching ideas tonight. I like this idea, but I’m confused. I’ll sleep on it.

Sarah Vang: Project 3 Proposal

Right now, the idea in my head is very rough. The video will move through the day of someone who is reflecting on her day in her journal/diary. She will move quickly through reality and fantasy/daydreams, not really knowing where one starts and the other ends, but only because she doesn’t care what is real and what is not. The letter I want to focus on is the letter D. I’m looking for a sound track that would be able to lead the main character through her thought process.

A day for her will be composed of “normal? components. Some ideas of what is defined as “normal? activities include: waking up, driving to school, attending classes, eating lunch/dinner, studying, going home, free time, working, getting ready for bed, etc. Not all of these will be shown in the project.

I want to have all audio done as a voice over, and I think voice overs will fit the most. A stark contrast in color will be hard for me to do, especially since what I plan to do will involve going to different places and shooting on different locations where I don’t have as much control over the lighting. To get as much contrast as I can, I will check out lights and reflectors and experiment with what I have available to use. I will still use both stop-motion and video in this project, and I think it will be similar to that of La Jetee in the sense that the photos will be longer and slower but opposite because my project will have somewhat of an equality of stop-motion and video. The idea of this project that is forming in my head and is gradually getting on paper won’t be too focused on using lighting to change the scene, too. The movie M had the lighting as an element to help show change and the difference between what is dream and what is reality. I can most likely think of a way to be able to improvise.

Project 3 Proposal - Ken Shores

I am planning on doing a video project surrounding a Rube Goldberg machine. If you are not familiar with the concept of a Rube Goldberg machine, here is an excellent example of several in a youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_smJ5NPMheY

I believe that a machine like this, made of (in my case) legos, books
and run with marbles would make an interesting film and could generate
a lot of still and video footage options for doing the post editing
I'm interested in. The concepts I wish to build on can be seen in the
latter half of this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYYfJAMP-BE&feature=related

I like the short and quick shots showing part, but not all of the
machine. I'd like to work around the concept of the viewer not being
able to see the whole of the run, like in many RGMs. A final video I'm
drawing some inspiration from, though I doubt my final project will
reflect it too much, is Pipe Dream, from the Animusic project. If you
haven't seen it, this is a technical and artistic wonder all its own.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAvPRbh0jmE

I'm planning to obtain a large space and spend an afternoon setting up
a wholly too-long machine, and when the sun goes down I can white
balance without fear of new light sources. I may invite friends along
to help me construct it, but am willing to put it together on my own
as well. I have a few ideas already in the works for manipulations to
shots and footage (I plan on taking still images and video). As is
true for most RGMs, I will embrace the purpose - to do something very
simple via an entirely too complex means, and hopefully will be able
to show that at the beginning, drawing the otherwise potentially
arbitrary ending as "completing the action."

Project 3 Proposal - Ken Shores

I am planning on doing a video project surrounding a Rube Goldberg machine. If you are not familiar with the concept of a Rube Goldberg machine, here is an excellent example of several in a youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_smJ5NPMheY

I believe that a machine like this, made of (in my case) legos, books
and run with marbles would make an interesting film and could generate
a lot of still and video footage options for doing the post editing
I'm interested in. The concepts I wish to build on can be seen in the
latter half of this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYYfJAMP-BE&feature=related

I like the short and quick shots showing part, but not all of the
machine. I'd like to work around the concept of the viewer not being
able to see the whole of the run, like in many RGMs. A final video I'm
drawing some inspiration from, though I doubt my final project will
reflect it too much, is Pipe Dream, from the Animusic project. If you
haven't seen it, this is a technical and artistic wonder all its own.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAvPRbh0jmE

I'm planning to obtain a large space and spend an afternoon setting up
a wholly too-long machine, and when the sun goes down I can white
balance without fear of new light sources. I may invite friends along
to help me construct it, but am willing to put it together on my own
as well. I have a few ideas already in the works for manipulations to
shots and footage (I plan on taking still images and video). As is
true for most RGMs, I will embrace the purpose - to do something very
simple via an entirely too complex means, and hopefully will be able
to show that at the beginning, drawing the otherwise potentially
arbitrary ending as "completing the action."

Lisa Project 3 Proposal

I want this project to be mainly a sound project, since I haven't worked with sound before. I plan to use poems that I have written over the past year or so, record myself (and others?) reading each one, bring them all into Soundtrack Pro and then do something brilliant (but yet to be determined) with them.

I am interested in the idea of the obsessions of the artist--I think it is common for artists of all sorts to get to a point where they are continually rehashing this one idea or situation or image in their work, either consciously or subconsciously, and only when you are presented with a timeline of their work do you get to see these obsessions and how they operate.

I guess with this project I would like to explore the subconscious life of my text, in other words, to ask: What does my writing reveal when left to its own devices? What are its obsessions? What sorts of unexpected connections can be made across poems? What new meaning emerges when the text is forced into random interactions? Etc.

At this moment, I am thinking that this requires an element of randomness, or at least the semblance of randomness. I'm not exactly sure how I could accomplish this. Possibly with audio loops that naturally have different durations. I sort of am curious to see what happens when I am not entirely in control. Another tactic might be to have other people read my poems without my guidance or presence and see what happens, or to have many people read the same poems and see what happens. I think it will become clearer to me where I want to go with this after some initial experimentation.

April 8, 2008

Alina Cheng Project 3 Proposal

For my final project, I would like to do a commercial from De Beers. I don’t want to reenact a commercial; I would like to make one up for myself. I think it will have influences from the other commercials, but mine won’t be exactly the same as any of the existing ones.
I would like to do this for my final project because I already made a “cutesy? and childlike movie for my first stop motion, and the “Peter Pan? remake was also from a children’s movie- and I feel that both of these were very noisy and dramatic pieces. There is nothing wrong with them; I just want to try something different. I want to make something more adult, and something that looks real- as if the commercial could really exist. I really want the commercial to look well done and polished enough to look as though it could be on T.V.
I had a faint idea that I wanted a stop motion again, but this time in black and white. I wanted the mood that comes with black and white- and a love story within it. I feel that it gives it almost an old fashioned times aura, like it took place in the 1920-50s. I had thought about doing a housewife’s story, but it didn’t really speak to me as much as I thought it would. I saw a De Beers commercial on youtube.com and was inspired enough that I wanted to do something similar.
In my commercial, I would have a narrator tell the story of a man who passes a girl everyday, and can’t get her out of his mind. Finally, he decides that he wants her forever so he gives her a diamond- because a diamond and love are forever.
Here is what I was thinking the narrator could say. The shots would correspond with what the narrator would say. These lines are rough, but a general idea of what I want, and I think it’ll make more sense when I put it together with the pictures.
“Lost in reverie, he doesn’t notice her approach.?
“But then the look.?
“The touch?
“The separation?
“Again and again, day by day this kept happening. He didn’t want this. He wanted her to stay.?
“And then he knew what to do.?
And then written at the end, “Love (and diamonds) is forever?
There would be multiple shots of the man and woman passing each other and looking back at each other. There would also be multiple shots of close ups of their faces and them looking at each other. At the end, I would show him putting the ring on her, and then the two of them walking away together.
I’m actually debating whether or not I want a narrator, but I think once I have all the shots and recorded the narrator’s part, I will know is it works or not.

Abinadi Meza: Found Voice, Solo Museum

Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program
Abinadi Meza: Found Voice, Solo Museum

http://www.artsmia.org/index.php?section_id=2&exh_id=2758

April 7, 2008

Jeremy Sengly Final Project Proposal

View image

For my Final Project I intend to make a mock infomercial for graphic design. I would like to comment on the expectations of the graphic design world, classism within design, graphic design education, and how the rest of the world views design.

This infomercial will also purposefully use the faux pas of the genre to add humor and irrelevence to the short. I plan to shoot in studio B so that I will be able to take advantage of the green screen.

Here is a rough idea of the timeline:
The short will begin with the host/guide walking onto the screen, as their monologue begins. The background at this point will be a blank white wall. The speaker begins to talk about the wonder and power of design as motion graphics burst awkwardly into screen. At this point cut scenes showing examples of the daily life of a designer, highly glorifed scenes of client meetings, press checks, and computer manipulations will be played. When the camera returns to the speaker a second character will be in frame, unintroduced. They will play the "confused and easily impressed cohost, representing the public view of graphic design. At this point the second character will ask questions. As they are answered the video will begin to devolve into psychedelia. This will represent how there is a constantly evolving definition of what it is to be a graphic designer.


Louis Adams - Project 2 Write Up

I chose to remake the one on one rematch scene between Omar Epps (man) and Sanaa Lathan (woman). I decided to play both of the characters in this scene. I also chose to have Tsinu be the cameraman for my project because I knew that he would know a lot abut how to use the camera and what I meant if I were to say use the 180 degree rule for a certain set of shots.
Shooting this scene took a lot of dedication due to the difficulties that arose. The first day we went into the gym it was 8 am and we filmed until almost 1 pm. The entire film was ruined because the camera was on the wrong setting. Therefore we had to go back into the gym the next day at 7 to refilm.
Tsinu and I went into the gym with the set plan that we were going to film all of on character’s parts and then film all of the other character’s parts. We decided that since most of the shots had Lathan in it we would shoot her part first. I know basketball very well and I know that games don’t get too intense until close to the end so I chose not to do a lot of cuts back and forth to show that there was not much tension in the beginning.
In the middle of the scene when Epps gets the ball, the scene starts to take an emotional turn. I chose to use a different set of angles for the shots to show this idea of feeling and emotion.
After the man makes his third shot, things start to get real emotional. For this reason I decided to take certain shots with a lot of physical emotion and slow it down to show a sense of connection between the two characters. I also chose to use a lot of cuts during this time to show the intensity in emotion between the two. In case you never heard the song, “Fool of Me? by India Arie, I’ll tell you that the one I used in my video was greatly modified. Since my seen was a lot shorter than the original, I had to cut the track down by splitting it in different spots but on the same beat and meshing them together. I had to do this because the tone of the song changes with the tone of the video and I had to match it up correctly.

TSINU-PROJECT 2

The scene I chose to re-create is from the 2005 movie Crash. The fact that it’s a film that had a big impact on a lot of people including me, made me choose this film and the particular scene. Even though it didn’t seem hard at first, I found it very challenging to try and recreate the highly emotional scene. One of my main focuses was trying to stay true to the original scene to have the same emotional impact on the audience. The camera angle, characters movement and the music all together help bring high intensity to the scene.

The climax of the scene happens when the little girl gets shot. Even though I wasn’t successful in finding a little girl that resembles the age of the original character, with the right set up, I was sure I can create the same emotional impact. The main thing I noticed the filmmaker used to intensify the original scene is slowing down the action so that the audience can be left hanging for a little while guessing what’s going to happen next. It almost feels like a dream sequence. As the music starts to get louder, the action gets faster. The music does a very good job setting up the firing of the gun in the original scene, and that’s exactly what I chose to do for my re-enactment.

I shot the scene on a late afternoon so that the lighting of the scene resembles the original film scene. However, since I shot the scene in two different days, the next day happened to be a little darker than the first. So, I had to set up lighting to get the same feeling of a let afternoon sun. And I think it worked out pretty well for the most part. One of the major things I had a problem with, was audio. Since it was a very windy afternoon, the Boom Mic picked a lot of the back ground noise. On top of that, the camera was not calibrated the right way with the field audio mixer. So, the audio picked too much with a lot of static. Because of this reason, I was forced to do post dubbing for the audio. This I think might have taken some quality away from the scene. However, I made it work to the best of my abilities. And looking at the end product, if I had a little bit more time to shoot I could have had a better project. However, depending on the circumstances that were very limiting, it turned out pretty decent.

Download file

click here for a good time.

Download file

April 4, 2008

Ashley project 2

Download file

I remade the one of the last scenes from Harold and Maude. We shot in my apartment and used minimal props in an effort to focus more on the interaction between characters in the scene. The intent was to capture the emotion of the scene rather than recreate the physical environment. Additionally, I used the original scene as a rough guide to the remake. I studied the scene a few times, wrote down a few notes as to the positioning and types of shots, and used my best judgment to recreate a similar rendition of the scene rather than recreate it identically.

The filming process was much more harrowing than I originally imagined. We shot in my apartment, therefore we had many constraints on the different aspects of getting the shots we needed. Firstly the space we filmed in was much smaller than the space in the original Harold and Maude. I used additional space such as hallways and doorways to capture the shots. I was also forced to “cheat? on a few shots. One reason for this was there was a window on the far wall of the room, and we couldn’t shoot in front of it because it changed the color scheme of the shots. For example, we tried shooting using blinds over the window, but it still looked horribly over exposed. Then we put a yellow curtain over it, but then the whole room had a yellow glow. This didn’t match with the rest of the scenes, so we were forced to shoot up against a plain white wall. Through this process, I learned that the environment in which you shoot can be manipulated to fit the format of the needed shots.


Jeremy Sengly Project 2

Download file

For my remake I decided to reshoot a scene from The Royal Tenenbaums where Ritchie attempts suicide. This scene proved to be more complicated than it originally seemed. My first task was to decide where the scene ended. Since there were two possible endings to the scene I decided to try and combine them. I did this by removing the scenes that included the rest of the family rushing to the recovery room.

I also decided to reinterpret the costume and animals in the original scene. Ritchie's costume is tied to his childhood as a tennis star. I decided to have my remake tied to my childhood of late 80's early 90's clothing. I used a leopard fur coat in place of Margot's coat. I also decided to simplify Dudley's costume to Mordecai the falcon with a dog named Zeppo. This was mainly because I didn't have access to a trained falcon. I tried to keep the metaphor the same, by showing Zeppo with a leash, without his leash, and then running free.

The song "Needle in the Hay" by Elliot Smith controlled a lot of the movement and drama of the original scene, so I decided to keep it and try and make the pacing similar. This was the hardest part of the remake, it forced me to analyze the original scene very carefully and map out each time cue so that the energy and emotional impact wouldn't get lost in the differences in film quality and costume.

Overall I am happy with the remake. If I were to change anything it would be a closer attention to the composition of some of the scenes, mostly the scenes with Zeppo running. Lighting was also hard to control, I was originally planning to duplicate the blue hues of the original but they ended up interfering with the image, because of the overall darkness.

April 2, 2008

Sable - Project 2 Final

The Professional - Remake

My project was a remake of a scene from the movie, The Professional. The scene follows the protagonist in his dying moments as he his gunned down by the villain, Stansfield. Between my proposal blog and final, I believe I've encountered several shortcomings as well as several successes.

The bad. One of the important parts of the scene is the setting. In the original, Leon walks away from his blown-up apartment through the bottom level of the building. The lobby consists of a long hallway with a single open door at the end, a "light at the end of the tunnel." The scene follows Leon and Stansfield as they walk down the hall for the finale. Unfortunately, I couldn't find anywhere better to shoot than my friend's garage, which is apparent throughout the shots (car beside stansfield, junk in background, etc.) Another thing that could have used improvement was the lighting. For the scene, we used the overhead garage lighting. This worked fairly well for the scene, but there are moments when you can't clearly see the character's face do to backlighting. An opposite facing flood light could have helped (or some other source of light).

A couple things I think went well. Most of the shots were taken almost as precisely as they were in the original video. While filming, we had the video on hand on a computer; as we shot, we watched each scene several times to make sure we got it correctly. The fun part with this movie was the editing. Because its a remake of a scene from a regular movie, the cuts are quick and there are plenty of them. This made splitting up the footage more challenging, but made the end-product look a little bit more professional (no pun intended). Also, the post-effects (like the light swelling) and the soundtrack (pulled from the original movie) turned out really well also.

If I were to redo this, I would be a bit more careful about checking timecode, so that the 24 fps material would come through more clearly. Besides that, I would try some other lighting techniques, overdub techniques, and making sure my actors were being serious.

Sarah Vang: Project 2

Download file

I went through the whole list of movies on that website before settling on a list to choose from. From there, I rented the appropriate movies and watched them with my siblings, for both entertainment as well as helping to make my final decision. In the end, I was torn between the suicide scene in The Royal Tenenbaums and one of the scenes from The Green Mile. I ruled out the scene from the Royal Tenenbaums because of the lack of angles. One of the requirements is to have a certain number of different shots, and the scene had a few at maximum. When deciding between the two scenes in The Green Mile, I looked at who and what I had to work with.

My actors were my relatives, and with a small bribe I was able to recruit them to work for me. As a team, our thespian skills lacked, so I decided on the easier one to act; the handshake scene between the characters Paul Edgecome and John Coffey. My filming location was between the studio offered at the U and my basement. Although I rented out a camera, I didn’t have the chance to film. I took advantage of the studio area and rented it out for a few hours during spring break.

Our outfit was simple; a white collared shirt for the officers and whatever beaten-up clothing the prisoner owned. I had an idea of what I wanted to do for effects, so I felt the studio was even more valuable to me. Although I wanted to use props, I felt it would be out of place in the simplicity of everything else I planned for the re-enactment.

It was my first time using the studio, so I was unsure of what I had to do as well as intimidated by the tech worker who was to help me during my session. I stepped into the studio feeling sure of what I wanted to do, and within five minutes of talking to the tech worker, was left with a feeling of uncertainty. How was I going to get what was in my head onto the DV tape I was given? With the little knowledge of the area, and how to use the equipment (other than the actual camera), we were somewhat saved when another tech worker came through the door. I’d like to say that I got a hang of things in the studio eventually, but I can’t. The sour mood of the first tech worker, and the texting of the second tech worker made me want to film everything and get out of there as soon as possible. The shots weren’t too bad and the time was almost up, so we left with what we had. Even if my account of the tech workers seems negative, they helped me a lot. They were able to help me find a way around my electrocution problem, as well as the light exploding one.

As I was bringing in footage, I felt a pang of regret in my decision to not use microphones in the studio. With no audio, I was left with two decisions: overlay the audio of the scene or re-create the audio in my own style. As I pondered upon this decision, I remembered the video we were shown earlier on in the project. It seemed like my re-creation already paralleled his in many ways. It wasn’t my intention to. I decided to try and make my own sound. I looked up the soundtrack as well as used a few free sound effects circulating the internet. The voice overs were all recorded by me, since the other two characters never had the time to sit down and record a line. I had considered using only subtitles, but trying to find the correct color was harder for me than I thought.

This remake didn't turn out exactly as I had planned. Although I liked how I was able to experiment with different ways to remake a film, I feel like I didn't get to capture the true emotion of this scene with the footage and sound I ended up with. (Or maybe it was just the fact that all of us can't act to save our lives.)

Alina Cheng Project 2

Download file

I did my remake on “Peter Pan?, specifically the scene where Peter loses hope in the future and Wendy gives it back to him. At first, it was difficult to plan the shots because there was a lot of action involved, along with a lot of different shots. Once I storyboarded the scene however, it was easier to get a good grip on what I needed to do. I did the remake with an interpretation of my own. Peter Pan did not want to grow up and do the things that adults do while Hook represented what happened to adults when they grow up unsatisfied with life. So, I took that to mean that Peter Pan was a normal adolescent on the brink of being a teenager, and Hook was the evil corporate world that sucked kids into working. I feel that dressed the way I was, it was almost as if I was a principal or a businesswoman, and that represented the things that Peter did not want to be- a working man in a corporate world. Thus, he was dressed as a normal kid, and so was Wendy, since she is also a kid. The “pirate,? although it was hard to see him, was also dressed in business attire to represent the corporate world too, since he is an adult and in league with Hook.
One other difficulty was during the editing stage. I did not realize how jumpy the shots were when moving through the dialogue- the viewers would lose all sense of space and the movement of the characters was all over the place. It was suggested that I go with a “jump shot? style but I felt that it looked a lot like a movie trailer, not to mention that I didn’t really know how to go about that vision. So, I followed another suggestion in which I did close ups of people in order for there to be time for the characters to “move? over to where they ended up in the next shot. This way, it would seem like they moved but they really didn’t. I didn’t realize that editors had to cut out so much video, and really fine tune the clips so that the scene would move along and not lag behind. A problem I had was figuring out when to cut the clips so that the entire scene would flow smoothly. But after watching the scene over and over, I feel that I succeeded in this area. Using a shot gun boom was very helpful. The sound is surprising clear and the voices came out perfectly. The only problem was that there were cars driving around and someone shoveling the snow, but I was able to keep that at a minimal with editing and I don’t feel it’s really obvious.

Ken Shores Project 2

Download file

My video was a remake of the breakup scene from Cruel Intentions. In this scene, Sebastian goes to Annette’s house to break up with her. It was suggested to me as a scene that made my girlfriend cry not only because of how hard of a breakup the scene portrays, but because as the movie progresses, the viewer would know that Sebastian is breaking up with Annette even though he loves her and does not want to. It is possible to tell this just from watching the scene, because Sebastian is acted well, and this is part of what I tried to portray in my video.
The scene was shot in my dorm room. The camera angles used were chosen to model the shots from the film, and follow those positions as closely as the arrangement of my room allowed. The lighting in the room was white-balanced initially, but due to cloud-cover affecting the sunlight coming through the window, when the footage was reviewed the tones and shades shift quite often, even mid-shot. When editing the footage, I tried to choose shots that made the lighting consistent between screen-changes. Because so many had color-balance changes mid-scene, it wasn’t practical to try to use Final Cut Pro to post-edit the color-shifts out of the film.
When shooting, at least three, sometimes more “good? shots were taken for each set of lines. The shooting process was made much quicker by planning the shots ahead of time, though in the future I would be more conscientious of proper breaks between each take, as well as starting the tape a few seconds farther in (I lost my first take on my first scene because it was too soon on the tape). Also, I was thankful that my other actor had some experience in acting, and that I had coincidentally had another friend around to help with the shooting and cameras. I had not planned on a third person, and it made taking shots infinitely easier.
I learned post-shooting of a rule in film about an imaginary line between actors in a conversation, and crossing that line with the camera when switching shot angles in the final film. It becomes fairly obvious where I don’t adhere to this rule, though I suppose it could have been worse.
The largest point I learned from this project was the value of pre-shoot planning. I put 2-3 times as much time and thought into how the shooting would go than into the actual shooting, and I can see that even more planning wouldn’t have hurt. Much of my planning still seemed last-minute because I had troubles obtaining a camera and a second actor, but everything worked out as I reached the deadline.
I tried to capture the concept of the movie in spite of some of the relevant context being gone, and tried to follow very close to the original instead of doing an abstract portrayal of the film (which I was considering initially).

Stephen Project 2

My project went quite a bit differently than I planned. When several of my actors were unable to participate, I was forced to choose a different scene. So now, instead of working from Chaplin’s “The Gold Rush,? I decided to work from a segment from the film “Paris Je T’aime.? This particular segment, directed by Alexander Payne tells the story of a lone American tourist in Paris. The scene I chose to film is from the very end, when the tourist realizes, that although alone, there are more important things in the world, and loneliness only lasts for so long. The scene is simultaneously sad and uplifting, sad because of the loneliness the tourist feels, but again, uplifting upon his own epiphany.
To go about filming, I decided to go on a little bit different route. Instead of filming outside in a park I decided to use the green screen. Originally, I thought about putting footage from the actual film behind me, but I decided to do something a bit different. In the film, one of the key elements is the spirit of Paris, so I decided what better way to portray that spirit than by using paintings of the city. Each painting embodies the spirit of Paris in its own right and collectively they give an interesting view of the city. By using the green screen, I was able to place myself in a Monet painting and also to interact with other paintings, mostly by Seurat. The result is somewhat awkward, but illustrates what it is like to be in a place where you are entirely by yourself. In the painting, I stick out like a sore thumb, much like the typical American tourist. I found this aspect of the film important, because the tourist never really feels like fits in totally, but in the end finds peace within the city itself. The shooting process was tough, taking roughly 5 hours to set up only about 1 minute of actual film. Lighting for the green screen is quite tricky and takes a lot of trial and error before getting it just right. The paintings were all collected from various sources and put into some sort of motion, which was important to maintain a sort of kineticism with in the film. To me static paintings, while very pretty to look at, wouldn’t have been enough to provide the film with the energy it needs. All in all, the filming process was difficult, but the end product is something while vastly different from the original scene, is linked in spirit to its inspiration.