« Human Rights and Governance Issues in Africa | Main | Terrorism and Human Rights in India »

Economic recovery in Southern Sudan

INTERNATIONAL DIALOGUES SERIES: Economic recovery in Southern Sudan

Twenty years of civil war has resulted in enormous consequences for the
people of southern Sudan. Two million people have died and another 4
million have been displaced. Economic infrastructure has been destroyed or
damaged and commercial activity severely disrupted. During the transition
from war to peace, it is important that people are able to rebuild
livelihoods and return to communities where there is the economic
infrastructure to facilitate recovery.

Speaker: Greg Olson
Where: HHH room 186
When: Thursday, April 19, 1-2pm.
FREE PIZZA!!

Sponsored by PASA Diversity Committee and Global Policy Forum. Support by the Culture Corps Program, ISSS.

IMG_0022.JPG

Greg Olson gave us a quick but quite deep glimpse of Southern Sudan and the activities of numerous international organizations there.


IMG_0020.JPG

Rumbek, "a future London" is one of the most difficult places to live in.
Lack of canalization and good roads make humanitarian missions a challenge.
Paradoxically, you can buy pizzas for no less than 10$ there.


IMG_0021.JPG

And our great public :)

Comments

This is getting a bit more subjective, but I much prefer the Zune Marketplace. The interface is colorful, has more flair, and some cool features like 'Mixview' that let you quickly see related albums, songs, or other users related to what you're listening to. Clicking on one of those will center on that item, and another set of "neighbors" will come into view, allowing you to navigate around exploring by similar artists, songs, or users. Speaking of users, the Zune "Social" is also great fun, letting you find others with shared tastes and becoming friends with them. You then can listen to a playlist created based on an amalgamation of what all your friends are listening to, which is also enjoyable. Those concerned with privacy will be relieved to know you can prevent the public from seeing your personal listening habits if you so choose.