Recently in Local News Category

St. Paul police are investigating a shooting that led to one man's hospitalization late Saturday night, reports the Star Tribune. According to police, officers responded to a fight in the 400 block of Clinton Avenue late Saturday, reports The Star Tribune.
While on the way to the address, police received reports of gunfire in the area, reports The Pioneer Press. On arrival at the scene, police found a man with a gunshot wound to his torso, reports The Pioneer Press.
The unidentified man, 18, is in serious condition at Regions Hospital, reports Kare 11. No arrested have been made, although police report several fights that occurred while people were leaving the same party, reports Kare 11.

On Thursday morning around 8 a.m. Kimberly Yeong Sil Hull, 25, was struck and killed on the intersection of 15th Avenue and Forth Street in Dinkytown, reports The Minnesota Daily. The truck driver that hit Hull remained at the site for hours after and was very cooperative with police. The man was not arrested, as reported by the Minnesota Daily.
Hull was on her way to her job at the University of Minnesota's Rarig Center when the accident happened, reports The Star Tribune. Hull was a senior at the University of Minnesota, and was scheduled to graduate in two weeks, said the Star Tribune.
Police said that the warm weather is bringing out more cyclists who aren't used to being as vigilant about their surroundings, said The Republic. Minneapolis police are urging everyone to use caution near the University of Minnesota, where 3 other traffic/pedestrian accidents have occurred in the last week, reports The Republic.

Minnesota women makes up story of service.

Local Minnesotan Elizabeth McKenzie, 20, is being charged with impersonating an officer after she made up a story about one year of service to the US Army in Iraq, reports UPI. McKenzie's arrival home from Afghanistan was celebrated by her local town Cass Lake in a celebration for returning troops, says UPI.
Though McKenzie isn't a tribal member, the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe Honor Guard gave her a blanket and an eagle feather to mark her service, which was still unknown to be phony, reports the Star Tribune. McKenzie also made up that she was seriously injured while serving the country, reports The Star Tribune.
"Before a departure ceremony last year that was held at the town's American Legion hall, she posed in an Army battle dress uniform and told supporters she would be serving overseas with the Army's 302nd Battalion, 16th Regiment Military Police, an apparently fictional unit," reports The Star Tribune.

University of Minnesota students "mowed down" by car

Three University of Minnesota students were involved in a hit and run near 12th Avenue at about 2 a.m. Friday morning, reported The Star Tribune. "Someone shouted that a car was on the sidewalk, and pedestrian Katelynn Hanson spun on her heel to see a pair of headlights bearing down on her and her two friends," said the Star Tribune in an article.
Minneapolis police are still looking for the driver that left one of the three students critically injured on Friday, said Kare 11 in an article. Two of the three students have been released with minor injuries and are expected to fully recover, said Kare 11.
The driver of the car was going the wrong way on 5th street when it drove onto the sidewalk, hitting the three victims, reported the Minnesota Daily. Police are looking for a white Toyota Camry or Solera with damage to the front end, where it hit the students, reported the Minnesota Daily.

Minnesota Vikings have questionable year ahead.

The Minnesota Vikings want to pitch in around 30 to 40 percent of the cost of a new stadium, reports the Minnesota Daily. The Vikings are offering the money in light of recent state budget cuts, according to The Minnesota Daily. According to a study by CSN Bay Area, the Minnesota Vikings have done the seventh-best job of drafting new players in the NFL over the past five seasons, reports the Daily Norseman.

A new version of the state higher education funding bill proposed Tuesday in the House of Representatives seeks to cut $306 million statewide from higher education funding, as reported by the Minnesota Daily.
The legislation would cut $161.9 million from the University of Minnesota alone, reports the Minnesota Daily.
"Put simply, I had access to high quality and reasonably priced public education," said Monte Bute in an interview for Minnesota Public Radio, "If today's political climate had prevailed then, it is unlikely that I would have taken those tentative first steps at a local junior college.
A Georgetown University study projects that by 2018, 70 percent of Minnesota's new job openings will require post secondary education, as reported in an article for Minnesota Public Radio.
The legislation also bans spending toward human cloning, reports The Star Tribune.
The University of Minnesota total spending will be cut by 13% after the budget cuts, reports The Star Tribune.

A 21-year-old Blaine man has been arrested in connection with a group drug overdose that left Trevor Robinson, 19, dead and sent 10 others to the hospital on Thursday.
Robinson, who is from Coon Rapids, died Thursday at Unity Hospital in Fridley after overdosing on 2C-E at a party. There were 10 other hospitalizations for overdose symptoms stemming from the same party, as reported by The Twin Cities Pioneer Press. Robinson was the father of a 5-month-old baby, reported ABC News.
Timothy Richard Lamere, 21, of Blaine is being held on suspicion of murder in the third-degree and charges that he allegedly supplied the group with the drug 2 C-E, as reported by the Star Tribune.
2C-E is an unregulated synthetic hallucinogen that can be legally bought over the internet. It is also commonly referred to as "Europa," reports ABC News. Synthetic hallucinogens are widely available, coming from countries such as China and Thailand where there is little regulation or monitoring of the production of chemicals, said the Drug Enforcement Administration in a article for ABC News.
Lawmakers have been working hard with drug enforcement agencies to decrease the availability of synthetic drugs to the public, reported ABC News. Last month in Minnesota, the state House approved a bill to ban synthetic marijuana. Most websites market 2C-E as a "research chemical."
Paul Sommer of the Anoka County Sheriff's Office said in a news conference Thursday that he had never seen anyone die from an overdose of 2C-E, adding that, "Today, that's no longer the case," reported the Star Tribune.

College students forced to return home from Japan.

Students from Gustavus Adolphus College and The University of Minnesota are being asked to return home from Japan in wake of the recent 8.9 magnitude earthquake.
Seven students from the University of Minnesota and six from Gustavus Adolphus College have been asked to return home from their study abroad trips in a response to the U.S. Department of State's travel warning for Japan, as reported by The Star Tribune.
The inconsistent availability of power and resources such as transportation are among the reasons behind the University of Minnesota's decision to bring home students, said U of M spokesperson Dan Wolter in an interview for Minnesota Public Radio.
There are also growing concerns over a nuclear meltdown and additional aftershocks and earthquakes, which could all end up damaging student housing and international universities, reports The Minnesota Daily.
The decision to bring students home was not an easy choice--In an interview for the Star Tribune, Gustavus Dean of College, David Fienen said, "We recognize the richness of the academic experience for our students in Japan. At the same time, however, their safety is our highest priority."

A new study has found that our Minnesota streams are full of potentially dangerous chemicals.

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has come out with a new study that suggests our water is filled with residual chemicals from anti-depressants, antibiotics and attention deficit medications, as reported by City Pages (http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2011/03/minnesota_strea.php).

Minnesota Public Radio (http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/03/11/wastewater-pharmaceuticals-streams/) reported that scientists found chemicals at more than 90 percent of the locations they sampled and chemical traces at all locations, according to a study by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. While some of the locations only had traces in parts per billion or trillion, the report claims it can still have an effect on the local animal and plant life.

The study leaves many questions unanswered, such as how the chemicals have effected the fish, plants and wildlife that live in and drink the dirty waters. More research is necessary to tell how much the hormone-acting chemicals have effected the fish,"More and more results are coming out that show that these compounds can have pretty profound hormonal effects or estrogenic effects even at those concentrations." said scientist Mark Ferrey in an interview with Minnesota Public Radio.

The cause of the chemical spread is uncertain, since traces were found from both up and downstream from chemical treatment plants. Scientists are now interested in doing a study that tests whether or not the chemical spread has reached a level where it is in our rain, reports Minnesota Public Radio.

The University of Minnesota closed Morril Hall for a brief period Thursday due to the discovery of a suspicious package in a mail room.

A postal worker is said to have called University of Minnesota police Thursday afternoon after he heard beeping noises coming from a package left at the mailboxes for Morril Hall, said the Minnesota Daily (http://www.mndaily.com/2011/03/10/suspicious-package-closes-morrill-hall-church-street)

Morril Hall is where the office of the school's president is located, among other administrative offices, as reported by Fox 9 News (http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/dpp/news/minnesota/morrill-hall-evacuated-umn-mar-10-2011). According to Fox 9 News, alerts were sent out by text message to students and other faculty, but an "all clear" message was sent only a half-hour later.

The package in question was discovered to contain a cell phone after the Minneapolis Bomb Squad was called to the scene, says The Minnesota Daily.

University spokeswoman Patty Mattern told the Minnesota Daily that she didn't know if President Bob Bruininks at the building during the evacuation.

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