Recently in High School (9-12) Category

Muslim Migration to Europe

Immigration to and migration within Europe has significantly increased since the mid-Twentieth Century. A lot of migration has been within Europe, especially by Eastern Europeans as well as migrants from North African countries. Since the 1960s, the percentage of immigrants to Europe who are Muslim has significantly increased. The settlement of Muslim communities in Europe has sparked many debates about European immigration and integration policies. This teaching module will explore the migration of Muslims to Europe and the history of immigration and citizenship policies in European countries.

III. WORLD HISTORY I. The Post-War Period, 1945 - Present: The student will demonstrate knowledge of significant political and cultural developments of the late 20th century that affect global relations.

This resource consists of maps and texts about climate change and its impact on migration. Its goal is to reveal how less developed regions such as Africa suffer disproportionately from climate change and to stimulate critical thinking about possible ways to mitigate the harmful effects of climate change.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:
V. GEOGRAPHY D. Interconnectedness: Students will understand and analyze examples of the impacts of natural hazards on human activities and land use.

Eugenics, Race, and Immigration Restriction

This resource consists of primary documents about the international eugenics movements in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its goal is to show how eugenics influenced immigration laws and how eugenics theories and policies circulated across national boundaries as tools of the state in controlling population and immigration.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:
I. US HISTORY J. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the imposition of racial segregation, African American disfranchisement, and growth of racial violence in the post-reconstruction South, the rise of "scientific racism," and the debates among African-Americans about how best to work for racial equality.

Immigration, Demographic Change, and National Identity

The goal of this resource is to stimulate critical thinking about how immigration relates to demographic change and shapes national identity. This resource includes two documents: one is written by a senior Japanese immigration officer who discusses Japan's immigration policy options, and the other is written by a Harvard professor who questions the influence of Hispanic immigrants on the United States.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:
V. GEOGRAPHY C. Spatial Organization: Migration to the United States from Europe, Africa and Asia; migration within the United States; refugee movements, and labor migrations.

Migration, Food, and Cultural Exchange: Mexico and the United States

The following sources include a poem and newspaper article that deal with contemporary issues of migration and foodways. Its goal is to examine food as an assertion of ethnic identity and as a site of cultural exchange and contestation between countries and people.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:
III. WORLD HISTORY F. Emergence of a Global Age, 1450 AD - 1800 AD: 2. Students will explain the consequences of the exchange of plants, animals, and disease microorganisms in both the Americas and Eurasia. 3. Students will explain the development of a world market of mineral and agricultural commodities.

I. US HISTORY B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763: 2. Students will explain the consequences of the exchange of plants, animals, and disease microorganisms in both the Americas and Eurasia. 3. Students will explain the development of a world market of mineral and agricultural commodities.

Projecting Maps, Making Representations

merc2.jpgThis resource compares four different world maps. Its goals are to encourage critical thinking about maps as representations and to show how maps influence the ways in which one conceptualizes the world.

There is not a specific state standard for 9-12 Geography that deals with map distortion, though many teachers may find this useful as an introductory activity or an exercise in critical thinking.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:

IV. HISTORICAL SKILLS B. Historical Resources: 1. Students will identify, describe, and extract information from various types of historical sources, both primary and secondary. 2. Students will assess the credibility and determine appropriate use of different sorts of sources.

V. GEOGRAPHY B. Essential Skills: The student will use maps, globes, geographic information systems, and other databases to answer geographic questions at a variety of scales from local to global.

Racial Encounters in Colonial America

This resource reprints European engravings of Amerindians in colonial New Spain and New Portugal. Its goal is to explain how ideas about race contributed to European justifications of conquest and colonization.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:
V. US HISTORY B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450 - 1763: The student will understand how European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural and ecological interactions among previously unconnected peoples.

Refugees in Contemporary Global Migration

The following sources include a news report in 2007 on Iraqi refugees in Sweden and interviews in 1998 of Hmong refugees living in Minnesota. Its goal is to explore the refugee experience, both from an international or geopolitical perspective and from a personal standpoint.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:

V. GEOGRAPHY C. Spatial Organization: The student will understand the regional distribution of the human population at local to global scales and its patterns of change. Example: Refugee movements.

II. MINNESOTA HISTORY G. Post-World War II to the Present: Students will identify and describe significant demographic changes in Minnesota and issues related to those changes and analyze the significance of their impact.

Remittances and Development

This resource uses maps, a video and texts to provide an understanding of the financial flows of migrant remittances. This goal is to encourage students to think critically about the multiple impacts of remittances on sending communities.

This lesson addresses state standards:

VI. ECONOMICS D. International Economic Relationships: The student will understand the key factors involved in the United States' economic relationships with other nations.

Transnational Social Networks: Historically and Today

This resource compares oral history and in-depth interviews about two different periods of immigration to the United States. Its goal is to complicate notions of migration as a unidirectional and permanent activity.

This lesson addresses state teaching standards:

II. MINNESOTA HISTORY G. Post-World War II to the Present: Benchmark 2. Students will identify and describe significant demographic changes in Minnesota and issues related to those changes and analyze the significance of their impact. 3. Hispanic, African and Southeast Asian immigrants, growth of suburbs, rural population loss

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the High School (9-12) category.

University/Post-Secondary is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.