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19th Democracy & Diversity Summer Institute Wrocław [Vrot-swaf], Poland July 10-26, 2010

http://www.newschool.edu/tcds/subpage.aspx?id=35796#Eligibility
19th Democracy & Diversity Summer Institute
Wrocław [Vrot-swaf], Poland
July 10-26, 2010

The nineteenth Democracy & Diversity Summer Institute, organized by the Transregional Center for Democratic Studies (TCDS) of The New School for Social Research, will take place in Wrocław, Poland, from July 10-26, 2010. TCDS will again welcome up to forty junior scholars from around the world for this intensive program of study in society, culture and politics, centered on the theme "Citizens Without Borders." As the strong ties of citizens to a specific territory have been loosening for some time already, we will explore the emergence of new aspirations, movements, and institutions that reflect this process of de-territorialization, and new practices that reshape identities and traditional notions of citizenship.

Located between Berlin, Prague and Warsaw, Wroclaw, a once vibrant German metropolis called Breslau, was almost totally annihilated during World War II. Repopulated and rebuilt by Poles, now -- twenty years after the collapse of Communism -- it exhibits a complex, multi-layered European identity. We will draw from its culture of the borderlands, and from the hybridity of a place where west meets east and where the past is revealed, in order to enter into a dialogue with new identities in transition.

The Wrocław Institute is organized in collaboration with the International Institute for the Study of Culture and Education at the University of Lower Silesia (DSW Wroclaw).

"The days were full of academic rigor - reading from sun up until dusk,
trying to cram in readings for the subsequent class at any opportune time.
The nights were full of eventful speakers ... nights on the town, and intellectual conversations...Just when you think class is over, the discussion never dies."
--Aleksandra Solak, USA (Wroclaw participant, 2009)


The DEADLINE for applications is MARCH 12, 2010.


COURSES

Cosmopolitanism and its Discontents -- GSOC 5053; GPOL 5053
Professor Andreas Kalyvas, Political Science, The New School for Social Research

Whether defined as moral and political theory, as ethical ideal and vision of justice - or as a discourse on social belonging that transcends the national, shapes new transnational identities, and advances the concept of flexible citizenship - cosmopolitanism, with the advent of globalization, has re-entered philosophical, social and political discourse as an alternative paradigm to the nation-state and bounded territorial communities. In a progressively integrated international context, cosmopolitanism seeks to re-imagine the world as a universal borderless polity and a place that could constitute a home for all. This seminar will examine the classical foundations of cosmopolitan thought in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and trace its modern reappearance in Western Enlightenment, engage in close examination of its relation to nationalism, democracy, liberalism, law, citizenship, feminism, capitalism, and empire, and consider some of its most vocal critics. Questions pertaining to the relationship between universalism and particularism, identity and difference, inclusion and exclusion, war and peace, and civic life and individual human rights will be central to the seminar's discussions.

Globalization and the Politics of Public Memory -- GLIB 5304; GSOC 5145
Elzbieta Matynia, Sociology and Liberal Studies, The New School for Social Research

This course examines the politics of public memory which have become particularly tense at a time in which social and political systems are being dismantled and reconfigured, ethnic identity reemerges as a powerful source of conflict, and nation-states are challenged by new global arrangements. The concepts of nation, identity, and globalization will inform our examination of emblematic locations, among them the city of Wroclaw itself, with its multilayered Czech, Austrian, German and Polish pasts. We will discuss the relationship between history and memory, space and time, globalization and memorialization - as well as approaches to the crimes of the past in the transformations from authoritarian to democratic order, all while paying attention to representational strategies designed to elicit the "meaning" of memory sites, whether in public art or historic districts. We will apply a phenomenological approach to discuss memory as a wound, as an erosion, and try to grasp the social meaning of "good" memory. Finally, we will ask how to deal with the painful conditioning of memory in societies that are trying to build a new, better, and more just present. And how does one represent a volatile, multifarious and sometimes discredited past in a way that will enrich and amplify its interpretive possibilities rather than diminish them?

Media, De-territorialization, and the Sociology of the Sphere of Publics -- GSOC 5146
Jeffrey Goldfarb, Sociology, The New School for Social Research

The basis of our investigations will be a sociological understanding of how the electronic media disengages social space from physical space. We will proceed with the question of public life, moving from the analysis of the structural transformation of the public sphere toward the analysis of the making of publics and spheres of publics. We will move from a consideration of the public as a specific site for rational deliberation, toward the analysis of other key cultural forms of public action: appearance, display, embodiment, contestation, competition and other forms of political participation. This analysis will then be applied to a comparative examination of the mediated social interactions of de- territorialized citizens in social movements, addressing some major issues of our times: race, ethnicity and nation, global warming, human rights, the questions of war and peace.

Migration, Integration, Citizenship in the EU and beyond: Political, Legal and Socio-economic Dimensions -- GPOL 5319; GSOC 5319
Claus Offe, Political Science, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin

EU-Europe is presently just a few years away from the completion of internal mobility, i.e. the condition that all citizens of member states have equal residence and social rights in any of the member states. The resulting patterns of cross-border migration will be shaped by international wage differentials, linguistic barriers, and supply and demand in labor markets of member states. In addition, refugees, asylum-seekers, as well as job-seekers (legal as well as sans papiers) will continue to come from countries and regions outside the EU, be it from neighboring regions (e.g., Ukraine), from former colonies of some member states, or from far-away places such as South Asia and, in particular, Africa. At the same time, migration policies in many of the old as well as the new member states have been shaped by increasing levels of xenophobic sentiments, security concerns, and populist elite policies, leading to a large number of new laws and regulations being adopted over the last decade (on citizenship, residence rights, integration, humanitarian and family rights, etc.) both at the national and the EU level. The course will explore some of the complex dynamics that determine politics and policies in the field of migration, integration, and citizenship and address the normative issues involved.

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

This year's cultural program will include an exploration of architectural and historical landmarks of Wrocław, such as the modernist masterpiece Centennial Hall; Wrocław's Old Jewish Cemetery, and the Quarter of Mutual Respect, where four temples of four different religions are in close proximity, including the famous White Stork Synagogue. The cultural program will also include evening sessions in Wrocław's cultural and artistic institutions with prominent intellectuals and artists from the region.

ACCOMMODATION

The Institute participants will be housed in the Park Hotel of the Ośrodka Szkolenia Panstwowej Inspekcji Pracy conference center, located in Park Szczytnicki near the center of Wrocław. The hotel is close to the historical part of the city and walking distance from the famous Centennial Hall. Shared accommodations will be arranged for participants in the modernist dormitory and classes will be held in the next-door conference center. Breakfast and lunch will be served in the hotel.

PROGRAM COSTS

• Participants from The New School:

Tuition: Tuition costs for courses taken for credit at the 2010 Summer Institute in Wroclaw are based on the summer 2010 NSSR tuition rates for graduate students and are part of fall 2010 Lang tuition for Lang students. New School financial aid is applicable. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

Program Fee: In addition to the cost of tuition, there is a program fee of $2,000 which will cover participants' room and partial board (breakfast and lunch) for the duration of the Institute, as well as the cultural program of lectures, tours, opening and closing receptions, etc. Travel costs are not included.

Scholarships: Scholarships to cover all or part of the $2,000 program fee are available to successful NSSR applicants. Please indicate on your application form if you would like to be considered for a scholarship.

• Participants from other universities in the US and universities/NGOs abroad:

Program Fee: The program fee of the 2010 Summer Institute for non-New School students is USD2000, covering tuition (non-credit), room and partial board (breakfast and lunch), and the cultural program of lectures, tours, opening and closing receptions, etc. Travel costs are not included.

Scholarships: A limited number of scholarships to cover all or part of the USD2000 program fee may be available. Please indicate on your application form if you would like to be considered for a scholarship. However, we strongly encourage all applicants to look for funding from their home institutions and local NGOs.

ELIGIBILITY

• All applicants except for Eugene Lang College Candidates
Applicants (with the exception of those from Eugene Lang College, see below) should have completed their undergraduate studies by the time of the Institute and should be either enrolled in an advanced degree program or working as junior university teachers or researchers. Preference will be given to those applicants who can demonstrate active involvement in civil society and civic life.

• Candidates from Eugene Lang College
In order to be admitted into the program, applicants must be enrolled at the Lang College as juniors or seniors. ELC students in the Social and Historical Inquiry and Cultural Studies & Media concentrations are especially encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to those applicants who can demonstrate active involvement in civil society and civic life.

HOW TO APPLY

Applicants from Poland: All applicants from Poland should apply through the International Institute for the Study of Culture and Education of the University of Lower Silesia. Application materials should be submitted via e-mail: iisce@dswe.pl (include WR10 APPLICATION in the subject heading); or via fax: +48 71 358 27 58. Recommendation letter must be sent from the e-mail address belonging to its author or as an attachment to the application letter if scanned.

All other Applicants: All application materials can be submitted via e-mail: tcds@newschool.edu (include WR10 APPLICATION in the subject heading); via mail: Transregional Center for Democratic Studies, Attn: Wrocław 10, 80 Fifth Avenue, Room 517, New York, NY 10011, USA; or via fax: (1) 212 229-5929. Recommendation letter must be sent from the e-mail address belonging to its author or as an attachment to the application letter if scanned.

For further information, contact TCDS by phone at (1) 212 229-5580 ext. 3137 or e-mail tcds@newschool.edu.


The DEADLINE for applications is MARCH 12, 2010

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