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March 31, 2008

Example Title Pages

arch 2.jpg

arch 3.jpg

arch 1.jpg

March 12, 2008

portfolio design

archpic2.gifarchpic3.jpgarchpic1.gifarchpic5.jpgarchpic6.jpgarchpic7.jpgarchpic8.jpgarchpic9.jpgarchpic10.jpgarchpic01.jpg

After looking at many sites pictures of portfolios, I think the best designs are the ones with awesome pictures as backgrounds or the really plain ones with a simple picture/design and a simple title.

Here are some websites that caught my attention and can catch yours too if you look at them.

www.mc-j.com
This one is actually fun and amusing. I liked the idea of small pictures representing each project.

www.clara.se/
This one is creepy but it did make me laugh.

www.latteundlattlee.de
This site loves white space but really spiced it up. I liked it.

www.pentagram.com
This one also loves white space but the pictures really show up well and are beautiful.

www.sandstromdesign.com
This is my favorite, it is kind of confusing but the color background is really cool.

March 4, 2008

Humanity

“Obviously what constitutes an ideal balance between human world and nature is not the same for everyone everywhere. It is not just a scientific definition but a humanistic imperative. It arises from a personal view of what each of us believes the world to be; of what is nature, the individual, and society; and of what the past and the future are� (Crowe).

I have always been surrounded by a built environment. I did not grow up in the Sahara desert or a Brazilian rainforest, but a suburb in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The frameworks were the streets. Every street was paved, all houses were quite big and all parks had a playground. I was very fortunate child to live in a clockwork society where education had been handed to me and I hadn’t had to worry about the next meal.

http-::www.flickr.com:photos:s4xton:1315203469:.jpg (Photo by Aaron Landry on http://www.flickr.com/photos/s4xton/1315203469/)

Yet even though my life seemed sweet, I still had hardships and oppositions and I lived in a society where people struggled everyday to survive not only physically but mentally, socially, and spiritually as well. The built environment around me was not just a reflection of society and nature but a reflection of the people: A reflection of humanity. It is the phenomenon of feelings and ideas. The built environment is personal. Buildings allow me to see different points of view. They can represent conformity or originality. They can provide a sense of comfort or a sense of being lost. They can represent historical battles or past principles. Buildings can provide hope and awe or make me question. All in all, the built environment allows me to see the humanity in which I live next to and truly supports who I am.

“We have characteristically found our place in the world not through a thorough knowledge of the whole but rather through an intimate knowledge of places within it that are important to our lives�(Crowe).

100_0553_2.JPG This is the hallway that I walk down everyday. It may resemble the hallway from The Shining and cause fear in the eyes of many, but to me it represents humanity and conformity.

“It is more than just a shelter. Here the domicile is seen as the fundamental paradigm for an ordered existence�(Crowe).

“It must not be forgotten, however, that the discourse must be received as well as given, and that whether it is received or not depends upon the value system of the recipient. This means that insanity is defined differently from one culture to another because of these differences in value systems and that the schizophrenic of one culture may be the shaman or the prophet of another� (Boulding).


( (Buildings and Architecture) Posted by madscientist 21 on youtube.com) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUNbWzQIWHQ)
This is a montage of buildings that represents humanity and ideas.

References from Readings

Boulding, Kenneth E. The Image; Knowledge in Life and Society, The University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 1956

Crowe, Norman. Nature and the Idea of a Man-Made World. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1995