May 2012 Archives

The concept of what constitutes a sound scientific experiment is something I learned this year In Psychology that I will be most likely to remember in 5 years.

I had a general idea of what made an experiment accurate, but now I feel that I understand completely. Now, whenever a read an article or listen to a news story, I approach the information being given to me differently. I'm now curious about whether an experiment being reported has been replicated by someone else, and how the group of participants in the study were randomly chosen and randomly assigned. I'm also more aware of people possible biases.

In this world we are constantly being bombarded with information, and after taking this course I feel I am better able to sort through that information and decide for myself what to believe, instead of just accepting everything at face value.

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Remembering Psychology

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Honestly, two things stuck out to me this semester in Psychology 1001.

The first concept that intrigued me was visual, or optical, illusions. It intrigued me because this visual deception effects everyone. The arrangement of images, effects of colors, impact of light, and other variables lead to these visuals. While optical illusions may effect everyone, they don't always effect everyone in the same way. Some people struggle to see certain images that others may see easily. It is so interesting to think about! Everyone's eyes allow them to see something different, and it isn't only their eyes, but their brain. There are also studies that people with mood disorders and addictive disorders view these illusions differently. It all is intriguing to me.

Another concept I found intriguing, was the study of child development. It was easy to learn, and therefore, embedded itself in my mind. It's interesting to learn about children and object permanence or egocentrism. Knowing that when a ball or a toy falls under the couch, they believe it is gone forever or doesn't exist anymore. "Out of sight, out of mind", I never truly understood that this concept emerged from child psychology. Also, the experiment with the glasses. The liquid fills a glass higher when the glass is skinnier, and the child will therefore prefer that glass, assuming there is more liquid in the container. Very interesting and something I know I will remember in five years!

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