Recently in Call for Papers Category

GWSS is excited to sponsor the upcoming conference, "Contingent Belongings: Queer Reflections on Race, Space, and the State," September 16-17, 2011. Keynote speakers: Christina Hanhardt and Nayan Shah. For more information and Call for Papers (due June 20, 2011), see: http://contingentbelongings.wordpress.com/

The field of queer studies has made important contributions to interrogating the notion of belonging as a technology of cultural, social, and political membership. Yet scholarship in sexuality studies has not always attended to the multiple contingencies that structure belonging, particularly in relation to the unevenness of spatial and racial formations that shape access to cultural and national citizenship. Recent discussions of homonormativity and homonationalism have demonstrated the importance of understanding how social and political belonging are contingent upon the exclusion of certain bodies and practices. The recent repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell and the criminalization of immigration with the passage of SB1070 illustrate the contradictory logics of national, sexual, and racial belonging.

This conference examines the contingencies of belonging in relation to racial and sexual imaginaries and practices. How can we understand the desire to belong? What are the costs of belonging, and who can refuse to belong? Who gets to determine the framework for belonging? What does resistance look like under these conditions?

We hope to create a vibrant space for intellectual exchange with an emphasis on interdisciplinary scholarship. We welcome submissions from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars from a wide range of fields, including gender and sexuality studies, ethnic studies, American studies, geography, history, education, media and communication, and cultural studies, among others.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

- immigration, citizenship, and law

- space, movement, and diaspora

- intimacy, kinship, and family

- affect and desire

- U.S. empire and settler colonialism

- labor, neoliberalism, and biopolitics

- culture as a site of critique/resistance/knowledge production

- activism and coalition

- queer world-making and alternative practices

- aesthetics and decolonization

- race, place, and identity

Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief bio of no more than 100 words to contingentbelongings@gmail.com by JUNE 20, 2011. Conference applicants will be notified no later than July 15th.

Sponsored by the Graduate Interdisciplinary Group in Sexuality Studies at the University of Minnesota, with support from the Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies.

Editor: Trystan T. Cotten
Deadline for abstracts: January 15, 2009
Deadline for complete essays: April 1, 2009
Email: Trystan38@hotmail.com

Concepts of “migration� and “travel� abound in the field of Transgender Studies. Many transgender cultural productions explore questions of identity and transition trajectories using metaphors of home, displacement, relocation, etc. To our knowledge there are no full length text(s) or monographs that treat the many possibilities of critical, scholarly investigation of this subject in TG history, identity, and art/cultural production. We are proposing a volume of criticism to fill the void and invite contributions for an interdisciplinary collection on the topic. Broadly conceived Trans/Gender Migrations will explore, trace, and map the myriad meanings and functions of “migration� and “travel� in transgender cultural production, politics, and identity/subjectivity, including related concepts of movement and location like space (and spatiality), place, border(s), bridge(s), home, expatriation, displacement, relocation, etc.

We welcome essays from all academic disciplines and scholarly fields and provide some suggestions. Essays might examine these concepts and metaphors in transgender identities (and subjectivities), politics, and cultural productions like literature, film, dance and other performance arts, photography, music, body-art, etc. Or, how TG Studies is itself an interdisciplinary field of methodologies, theories, concepts, and knowledges that are imported from other disciplinary and artistic sites. When and where do western definitions of transgender (and transsexuality) fail to translate across cultural and geographical borders? Other possible topics include exploring the multiple crossings of gender/sex transitions: how the crossing of borders of sex/gender entails other shifts in identity and subjectivity like social class, race and ethnicity, national and religious identity, etc. What additional borders are crossed in sex/gender transitions? Essays might also examine the surgical re-mapping and re-routing of bodily tissues, nerves, organs, and chemicals on TG/TS bodies. Other topics for exploration might include how sex/gender transitions effect migrations to new sexual and political communities; how the politics of race, class, gender, (trans)sexuality intersect with or manifest in immigration policies of the state; and what politics of sex, gender, (trans)sexuality are operative in the forced displacement and relocation of peoples.

Please send a 500 word abstract, working title, and brief biographical statement (MS Word or PDF) to Trystan Cotten by January 15, 2009 at: Trystan38@hotmail.com. Please send a brief biographical statement along with your abstract. Completed essays (formatted in Chicago guidelines) are due by April 1, 2009.

CFP: Lesbian Lives XVI

Please find the following Call for Papers; Lesbian Lives XVI
‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture and the Media’

Friday 13 – Saturday 14 February 2009, University College Dublin (UCD),
Ireland

This 2-Day, International, Interdisciplinary Conference to be held at the
Women's Studies, School of Social Justice, University College Dublin, Ireland.
This year the theme will be ‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture
and the Media’. We welcome proposals from academics, scholars, students,
activists, documentary and film makers, writers and artists.

The conference organisers welcome proposals for (A) individual papers, (B)
sessions, (C) round table discussions, (D) workshops, and (E) visual
presentations.

A. Individual Papers: Individual papers should last 20 minutes (c. 2,400
words). Individuals should submit: (1) paper title, (2) abstract (c. 100
words), (3) biography (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional affiliation and
address, (5) audio-visual requirements.

B. Sessions: Panels of academic papers should include 3 speakers and 1
moderator. Each paper should last for 20 minutes (c. 2,400 words), with a
further 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit (1)
session title, (2) paper titles, (3) abstracts for each paper (c. 100 words),
(3) biography for each participant (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional
affiliation and address for each participant, (5) audio-visual requirements.

C. Round Table Discussions: Round table discussions should include 6 speakers
and 1 moderator. Each paper should last for 10 minutes (c. 1,200 words), with a
further 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit (1)
round table title, (2) rationale for round table (c. 100 words), (3) biography
for each participant (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional affiliation and
address for each participant, (5) audio-visual requirements.

D. Workshops: Workshops last 90 minutes. Proposers should submit (1) workshop
title, (2) rationale for workshop (c. 100 words), (3) biography (c. 100-150
words), (4) institutional affiliation and address (if relevant)

E. Visual presentations; documentary, video, art or media presentations by
individuals or groups are welcomed.

E-mail proposals to lesbian.lives@ucd.ie or post them to:

Lesbian Lives XVI:
‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture and the Media’

Women’s Studies,
Hannah Sheehy-Skeffington Building
University College Dublin, Dublin 4 Ireland

The closing date for the submission of proposals is Friday 27th November 2008

Visit http://www.ucd.ie/werrc/lesbianlives2009.html for conference updates.

CFP: "RACE MATTERS TO FEMINISM"

The 7th Annual Women's Studies Student Conference presents as this year's
theme:

"RACE MATTERS TO FEMINISM"

Â… or does it? Given this year's political climate, is this question still
relevant? Have we made any significant breakthroughs on this subject?

We invite students (both graduate and undergraduate from all disciplines
and colleges) as well as community activists to submit proposals for
papers, film, music, art, live performance, and other creative and
critical works.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Race and gender politics in the presidential elections.
• Historical exploration of race relations impacting on feminism and/or
vice versa.
• Explorations of the discourse on “postracial society.”
• Personal accounts of race and gendered experiences.

Please submit 200-word abstracts briefly describing your work to
wstudent@albany.edu no later than Friday, October 31, 2008.

Abstracts describing film and live performances should indicate the
project's running time (image or digital files of media projects may also
be submitted as e-mail attachments or through a URL if presented on the
web). You may use the same e-mail address to send us any inquiries.

For more information, please visit our website:
http://www.albany.edu/wstudent_conference/

This event is sponsored by the Department of WomenÂ’s Studies and organized
by students in the Graduate Orientation in WomenÂ’s Studies seminar (WSS
510).

Conference Date: December 4-5, 2008 at the University at Albany

Please spread the word.

Deadline extended to October 1, 2008 for proposals.

Call for papers for Challenging the Maternal Notion: Essays on an (Un)traditional Instinct

Editor: Alina M. Luna, Ph.D. (Western State College of Colorado)

Submissions are sought for an edited collection of essays that challenge traditional ideas of maternal instinct and motherhood. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collection seeks to offer a range of views that question or offer alternative explanations concerning aspects of the maternal that have traditionally been accepted as true. In doing so, this project will create a space for inquiry and analysis into what has been considered a sacred figure, yet one that has become increasingly lethal in our contemporary culture. The concept for this edited collection has garnered the interest of two academic presses.

Within the 20th and 21st centuries, academic essays and research studies such as those produced within the social and natural sciences (in anthropology, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy; in psychiatry, Dominique Bourget and Pierre Gagné; and in genetics, David Haig) have attempted to question the nature of maternal instinct, but controversy has followed. Writers and directors of film and fiction, often vehicles for the ideologies of popular culture, have depicted such mothers within the realms of horror and suspense (Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen King and David Cronenberg) or camp (John Waters). Musicians have also written and performed songs that depict mothers in bleak and questionable terms (Chrissie Hynde, The Police, Genesis). Within the medical and legal fields, one must ask if motherhood and maternal instinct are being redefined by advancements in reproductive endocrinology (assisted hatching, egg donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis) and problematized by prosecutorial arguments in a growing number of filicide trials (those of Andrea Yates, Deanna Laney, Dena Schlosser).

Deadline extended to October 1, 2008 for proposals.

Call for papers for Challenging the Maternal Notion: Essays on an (Un)traditional Instinct

Editor: Alina M. Luna, Ph.D. (Western State College of Colorado)

Submissions are sought for an edited collection of essays that challenge traditional ideas of maternal instinct and motherhood. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collection seeks to offer a range of views that question or offer alternative explanations concerning aspects of the maternal that have traditionally been accepted as true. In doing so, this project will create a space for inquiry and analysis into what has been considered a sacred figure, yet one that has become increasingly lethal in our contemporary culture. The concept for this edited collection has garnered the interest of two academic presses.

Within the 20th and 21st centuries, academic essays and research studies such as those produced within the social and natural sciences (in anthropology, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy; in psychiatry, Dominique Bourget and Pierre Gagné; and in genetics, David Haig) have attempted to question the nature of maternal instinct, but controversy has followed. Writers and directors of film and fiction, often vehicles for the ideologies of popular culture, have depicted such mothers within the realms of horror and suspense (Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen King and David Cronenberg) or camp (John Waters). Musicians have also written and performed songs that depict mothers in bleak and questionable terms (Chrissie Hynde, The Police, Genesis). Within the medical and legal fields, one must ask if motherhood and maternal instinct are being redefined by advancements in reproductive endocrinology (assisted hatching, egg donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis) and problematized by prosecutorial arguments in a growing number of filicide trials (those of Andrea Yates, Deanna Laney, Dena Schlosser).

Call for Submissions: Fat Queer Anthology

Working Title: Spilling Over: A Fat, Queer Anthology
Editor: Jessica Giusti, Feminist Studies Ph.D. Student, University of Minnesota
Contact: spillingover@gmail.com
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2008

Despite the attention given by queer studies to the materiality of bodies and the cultural and social inscriptions that designate them, still a dearth of both scholarship and literature exists around intersections of gender, sexuality, and fatness. As fat studies begins to emerge as a viable academic location of inquiry, questions surface as to how fat bodies, deemed "excessive" in their trespasses of size and space, create even more complex subject positions when compounded by queer desires. This proposed anthology seeks contributions addressing junctions of "fat" and "queer" in pieces that consider the representations and resistances of non-normative corporeality and also writings considering the theoretical conceptions of these intricate subjectivities. Spilling Over will reflect the notions of excess, boundaries, and containment implied by the labels "fat" and "queer" both singularly and collectively. In the form of scholarly writing and creative non-fiction pieces, essay submissions might consider (but are not limited to):

• theorizing the concept of "excess" as it pertains to fatness and queerness
• fat and queer identities; personal narratives; reclaiming "fat" and "queer"
• notions of (in)visibility, hypervisibility, and passing and/or privilege
• intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, (dis)ability, age, and religion
• the economics of the obesity "epidemic" and the diet industry
• fat, queer art and performance; performativity
• pleasure, sex-positivity, eroticizing non-normative bodies
• acceptance movements, political activism, resistance
• the engagement of feminism with fatness
• global, transnational, transcultural constructions of fat, queer bodies and lives
• critical reflections of fatness and queerness in media, literature, film, music, and visual arts
• the rhetoric of fat oppression, fatphobia, homophobia, transphobia, bigotry, responding to and/or addressing hate speech

By December 1, 2008, please send your 2,000 – 6,000 word submission, along with your complete contact information and a 50-100 word biography, to spillingover@... with the subject line of "Spilling Over – Submission." Submissions must be received in 12 point Times New Roman font and sent in via Word documents (PDFs will not be accepted). Pieces will be reviewed and decisions made by April 2009. Please note that accepted submissions will be approved on a tentative basis, pending editorial board approval once the anthology has secured a publisher.

Questions can be directed to me at spillingover@gmail.com or visit the MySpace page at www.myspace.com/spillingoveranthology

Co-Editors, Chris Bobel, University of Massachusetts Boston and Samantha Kwan, University of Houston

This edited collection will assemble scholarly yet accessibly written works that explore the dimensions of resistance to embodied taboos of all sorts. We are interested in pieces that describe and analyze the many ways that humans subvert the social constraints that deem certain behaviors and bodily presentations as inappropriate, disgusting, private and/or forbidden in various cultural and historical contexts. Empirical, historical, theoretical and narrative contributions are equally welcome. This book, intended as a supplemental text for use in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, aims to advance and deepen our understanding of the motivations, experiences and consequences associated with the bodies that break the rules through the (intersecting) lenses of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, culture, religiosity, class and nation.

The editors welcome submissions from scholars in a range of disciplines, including but not limited to sociology, women’s and gender studies, anthropology, science studies, cultural studies, literary studies, disability studies, psychology, and history. We especially encourage scholarship which focuses on areas outside the US and the West.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, practices that challenge: [after the jump]

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ~ March 5-7, 2009
Submission Deadline: November 1, 2008

The Executive Committee of the Tenth Annual Graduate Symposium on Women’s and Gender History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is pleased to announce a call for papers.  The Symposium, which is the capstone event of the History Department’s Women’s History month celebration, is scheduled for March 5-7, 2009.
 
To celebrate and encourage further work in the field of women’s and gender history, we invite submissions from graduate students from any institution and discipline.  The Symposium organizers welcome individual papers on any topic in the field of women’s and gender history; papers submitted as a panel will be judged individually. Preference will be given to scholars who did not present at last
year’s Symposium.


Call For Papers: 'Queering Anarchism'

Radical queer politics and anarchism have much in common. Queer theory
argues against traditional identity politics, recognizing the social
construction of 'sexuality' and identity categories. Anarchism argues
against any structured hierarchical arrangement of humanity that allows
some members of society to systematically exploit and oppress others.
Thus, both projects argue for a need to move beyond hierarchical and
naturalized arrangements of socially constructed identities--though, at
times, articulating those arguments in different ways. Nevertheless,
despite these commonalities, little has been written about the deep
connections between anarchism and radical queer politics. This edited
volume is an attempt to fill that gap.

With this book, the authors wish to assemble writings that are useful to
activists (i.e. not written in obscure academic jargon and relatable to
social movement contexts) working in the intersections of queer and
anarchist politics. Many anarchists use the term 'queer' as shorthand
for the LGBT community and have little understanding of what queer
theory can provide for a contemporary radical praxis and how it differs
from traditional LGBT politicsâ€"even some radical strands. Likewise,
there are many among the queer community who know little to nothing
about anarchismâ€"relying mostly on the sensationalist news medias'
construction of anarchists as terrorists, anti-organizationalists, etc.
This volume, then, will be split into three sections (theory, praxis,
and personal experience) featuring writing that deals specifically with
these intersections.

Interested authors should send a small abstract (just a paragraph
explaining exactly what it is you wish to do) along with your name and
brief bio (100 words or less, please) by August 15th to
propaganarchy@hotmail.com and rogue@riseup.net. Finished pieces will
range from 2500 to 5000 words. Below are some suggested questions and
issues for each section (feel free to come up with your own fantastic
topic too!):

Links

  • GWSS Course Blogs: 2009-2010

  • Helen Hawthorne Hartung Award Competition Idalia Robles De Leon

  • Helen Hawthorne Hartung Award Competition Jerod Greenisen

  • Links

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