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November 17, 2008

Call For Papers: Trans/Gender Migrations: Bodies, Borders, and the (Geo)Politics of Gender

Editor: Trystan T. Cotten
Deadline for abstracts: January 15, 2009
Deadline for complete essays: April 1, 2009
Email: Trystan38@hotmail.com

Concepts of “migration� and “travel� abound in the field of Transgender Studies. Many transgender cultural productions explore questions of identity and transition trajectories using metaphors of home, displacement, relocation, etc. To our knowledge there are no full length text(s) or monographs that treat the many possibilities of critical, scholarly investigation of this subject in TG history, identity, and art/cultural production. We are proposing a volume of criticism to fill the void and invite contributions for an interdisciplinary collection on the topic. Broadly conceived Trans/Gender Migrations will explore, trace, and map the myriad meanings and functions of “migration� and “travel� in transgender cultural production, politics, and identity/subjectivity, including related concepts of movement and location like space (and spatiality), place, border(s), bridge(s), home, expatriation, displacement, relocation, etc.

We welcome essays from all academic disciplines and scholarly fields and provide some suggestions. Essays might examine these concepts and metaphors in transgender identities (and subjectivities), politics, and cultural productions like literature, film, dance and other performance arts, photography, music, body-art, etc. Or, how TG Studies is itself an interdisciplinary field of methodologies, theories, concepts, and knowledges that are imported from other disciplinary and artistic sites. When and where do western definitions of transgender (and transsexuality) fail to translate across cultural and geographical borders? Other possible topics include exploring the multiple crossings of gender/sex transitions: how the crossing of borders of sex/gender entails other shifts in identity and subjectivity like social class, race and ethnicity, national and religious identity, etc. What additional borders are crossed in sex/gender transitions? Essays might also examine the surgical re-mapping and re-routing of bodily tissues, nerves, organs, and chemicals on TG/TS bodies. Other topics for exploration might include how sex/gender transitions effect migrations to new sexual and political communities; how the politics of race, class, gender, (trans)sexuality intersect with or manifest in immigration policies of the state; and what politics of sex, gender, (trans)sexuality are operative in the forced displacement and relocation of peoples.

Please send a 500 word abstract, working title, and brief biographical statement (MS Word or PDF) to Trystan Cotten by January 15, 2009 at: Trystan38@hotmail.com. Please send a brief biographical statement along with your abstract. Completed essays (formatted in Chicago guidelines) are due by April 1, 2009.

October 20, 2008

CFP: Lesbian Lives XVI

Please find the following Call for Papers; Lesbian Lives XVI
‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture and the Media’

Friday 13 – Saturday 14 February 2009, University College Dublin (UCD),
Ireland

This 2-Day, International, Interdisciplinary Conference to be held at the
Women's Studies, School of Social Justice, University College Dublin, Ireland.
This year the theme will be ‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture
and the Media’. We welcome proposals from academics, scholars, students,
activists, documentary and film makers, writers and artists.

The conference organisers welcome proposals for (A) individual papers, (B)
sessions, (C) round table discussions, (D) workshops, and (E) visual
presentations.

A. Individual Papers: Individual papers should last 20 minutes (c. 2,400
words). Individuals should submit: (1) paper title, (2) abstract (c. 100
words), (3) biography (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional affiliation and
address, (5) audio-visual requirements.

B. Sessions: Panels of academic papers should include 3 speakers and 1
moderator. Each paper should last for 20 minutes (c. 2,400 words), with a
further 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit (1)
session title, (2) paper titles, (3) abstracts for each paper (c. 100 words),
(3) biography for each participant (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional
affiliation and address for each participant, (5) audio-visual requirements.

C. Round Table Discussions: Round table discussions should include 6 speakers
and 1 moderator. Each paper should last for 10 minutes (c. 1,200 words), with a
further 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit (1)
round table title, (2) rationale for round table (c. 100 words), (3) biography
for each participant (c. 100-150 words), (4) institutional affiliation and
address for each participant, (5) audio-visual requirements.

D. Workshops: Workshops last 90 minutes. Proposers should submit (1) workshop
title, (2) rationale for workshop (c. 100 words), (3) biography (c. 100-150
words), (4) institutional affiliation and address (if relevant)

E. Visual presentations; documentary, video, art or media presentations by
individuals or groups are welcomed.

E-mail proposals to lesbian.lives@ucd.ie or post them to:

Lesbian Lives XVI:
‘Representations of the Lesbian in Art, Culture and the Media’

Women’s Studies,
Hannah Sheehy-Skeffington Building
University College Dublin, Dublin 4 Ireland

The closing date for the submission of proposals is Friday 27th November 2008

Visit http://www.ucd.ie/werrc/lesbianlives2009.html for conference updates.

October 2, 2008

CFP: "RACE MATTERS TO FEMINISM"

The 7th Annual Women's Studies Student Conference presents as this year's
theme:

"RACE MATTERS TO FEMINISM"

Â… or does it? Given this year's political climate, is this question still
relevant? Have we made any significant breakthroughs on this subject?

We invite students (both graduate and undergraduate from all disciplines
and colleges) as well as community activists to submit proposals for
papers, film, music, art, live performance, and other creative and
critical works.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Race and gender politics in the presidential elections.
• Historical exploration of race relations impacting on feminism and/or
vice versa.
• Explorations of the discourse on “postracial society.”
• Personal accounts of race and gendered experiences.

Please submit 200-word abstracts briefly describing your work to
wstudent@albany.edu no later than Friday, October 31, 2008.

Abstracts describing film and live performances should indicate the
project's running time (image or digital files of media projects may also
be submitted as e-mail attachments or through a URL if presented on the
web). You may use the same e-mail address to send us any inquiries.

For more information, please visit our website:
http://www.albany.edu/wstudent_conference/

This event is sponsored by the Department of WomenÂ’s Studies and organized
by students in the Graduate Orientation in WomenÂ’s Studies seminar (WSS
510).

Conference Date: December 4-5, 2008 at the University at Albany

Please spread the word.

September 9, 2008

CFP: EXTENDED DEADLINE Challenging the Maternal Notion (10/1/08; edited collection)

Deadline extended to October 1, 2008 for proposals.

Call for papers for Challenging the Maternal Notion: Essays on an (Un)traditional Instinct

Editor: Alina M. Luna, Ph.D. (Western State College of Colorado)

Submissions are sought for an edited collection of essays that challenge traditional ideas of maternal instinct and motherhood. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collection seeks to offer a range of views that question or offer alternative explanations concerning aspects of the maternal that have traditionally been accepted as true. In doing so, this project will create a space for inquiry and analysis into what has been considered a sacred figure, yet one that has become increasingly lethal in our contemporary culture. The concept for this edited collection has garnered the interest of two academic presses.

Within the 20th and 21st centuries, academic essays and research studies such as those produced within the social and natural sciences (in anthropology, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy; in psychiatry, Dominique Bourget and Pierre Gagné; and in genetics, David Haig) have attempted to question the nature of maternal instinct, but controversy has followed. Writers and directors of film and fiction, often vehicles for the ideologies of popular culture, have depicted such mothers within the realms of horror and suspense (Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen King and David Cronenberg) or camp (John Waters). Musicians have also written and performed songs that depict mothers in bleak and questionable terms (Chrissie Hynde, The Police, Genesis). Within the medical and legal fields, one must ask if motherhood and maternal instinct are being redefined by advancements in reproductive endocrinology (assisted hatching, egg donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis) and problematized by prosecutorial arguments in a growing number of filicide trials (those of Andrea Yates, Deanna Laney, Dena Schlosser).

Continue reading "CFP: EXTENDED DEADLINE Challenging the Maternal Notion (10/1/08; edited collection)" »

CFP: EXTENDED DEADLINE Challenging the Maternal Notion (10/1/08; edited collection)

Deadline extended to October 1, 2008 for proposals.

Call for papers for Challenging the Maternal Notion: Essays on an (Un)traditional Instinct

Editor: Alina M. Luna, Ph.D. (Western State College of Colorado)

Submissions are sought for an edited collection of essays that challenge traditional ideas of maternal instinct and motherhood. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collection seeks to offer a range of views that question or offer alternative explanations concerning aspects of the maternal that have traditionally been accepted as true. In doing so, this project will create a space for inquiry and analysis into what has been considered a sacred figure, yet one that has become increasingly lethal in our contemporary culture. The concept for this edited collection has garnered the interest of two academic presses.

Within the 20th and 21st centuries, academic essays and research studies such as those produced within the social and natural sciences (in anthropology, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy; in psychiatry, Dominique Bourget and Pierre Gagné; and in genetics, David Haig) have attempted to question the nature of maternal instinct, but controversy has followed. Writers and directors of film and fiction, often vehicles for the ideologies of popular culture, have depicted such mothers within the realms of horror and suspense (Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen King and David Cronenberg) or camp (John Waters). Musicians have also written and performed songs that depict mothers in bleak and questionable terms (Chrissie Hynde, The Police, Genesis). Within the medical and legal fields, one must ask if motherhood and maternal instinct are being redefined by advancements in reproductive endocrinology (assisted hatching, egg donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis) and problematized by prosecutorial arguments in a growing number of filicide trials (those of Andrea Yates, Deanna Laney, Dena Schlosser).

Continue reading "CFP: EXTENDED DEADLINE Challenging the Maternal Notion (10/1/08; edited collection)" »

September 7, 2008

Call for Submissions: Fat Queer Anthology

Working Title: Spilling Over: A Fat, Queer Anthology
Editor: Jessica Giusti, Feminist Studies Ph.D. Student, University of Minnesota
Contact: spillingover@gmail.com
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2008

Despite the attention given by queer studies to the materiality of bodies and the cultural and social inscriptions that designate them, still a dearth of both scholarship and literature exists around intersections of gender, sexuality, and fatness. As fat studies begins to emerge as a viable academic location of inquiry, questions surface as to how fat bodies, deemed "excessive" in their trespasses of size and space, create even more complex subject positions when compounded by queer desires. This proposed anthology seeks contributions addressing junctions of "fat" and "queer" in pieces that consider the representations and resistances of non-normative corporeality and also writings considering the theoretical conceptions of these intricate subjectivities. Spilling Over will reflect the notions of excess, boundaries, and containment implied by the labels "fat" and "queer" both singularly and collectively. In the form of scholarly writing and creative non-fiction pieces, essay submissions might consider (but are not limited to):

• theorizing the concept of "excess" as it pertains to fatness and queerness
• fat and queer identities; personal narratives; reclaiming "fat" and "queer"
• notions of (in)visibility, hypervisibility, and passing and/or privilege
• intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, (dis)ability, age, and religion
• the economics of the obesity "epidemic" and the diet industry
• fat, queer art and performance; performativity
• pleasure, sex-positivity, eroticizing non-normative bodies
• acceptance movements, political activism, resistance
• the engagement of feminism with fatness
• global, transnational, transcultural constructions of fat, queer bodies and lives
• critical reflections of fatness and queerness in media, literature, film, music, and visual arts
• the rhetoric of fat oppression, fatphobia, homophobia, transphobia, bigotry, responding to and/or addressing hate speech

By December 1, 2008, please send your 2,000 – 6,000 word submission, along with your complete contact information and a 50-100 word biography, to spillingover@... with the subject line of "Spilling Over – Submission." Submissions must be received in 12 point Times New Roman font and sent in via Word documents (PDFs will not be accepted). Pieces will be reviewed and decisions made by April 2009. Please note that accepted submissions will be approved on a tentative basis, pending editorial board approval once the anthology has secured a publisher.

Questions can be directed to me at spillingover@gmail.com or visit the MySpace page at www.myspace.com/spillingoveranthology

August 17, 2008

***Embodied Resistance: Breaking the Rules in Public Spaces**

Co-Editors, Chris Bobel, University of Massachusetts Boston and Samantha Kwan, University of Houston

This edited collection will assemble scholarly yet accessibly written works that explore the dimensions of resistance to embodied taboos of all sorts. We are interested in pieces that describe and analyze the many ways that humans subvert the social constraints that deem certain behaviors and bodily presentations as inappropriate, disgusting, private and/or forbidden in various cultural and historical contexts. Empirical, historical, theoretical and narrative contributions are equally welcome. This book, intended as a supplemental text for use in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, aims to advance and deepen our understanding of the motivations, experiences and consequences associated with the bodies that break the rules through the (intersecting) lenses of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, culture, religiosity, class and nation.

The editors welcome submissions from scholars in a range of disciplines, including but not limited to sociology, women’s and gender studies, anthropology, science studies, cultural studies, literary studies, disability studies, psychology, and history. We especially encourage scholarship which focuses on areas outside the US and the West.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, practices that challenge: [after the jump]

Continue reading "***Embodied Resistance: Breaking the Rules in Public Spaces**" »

Tenth Annual Graduate Symposium on Women’s and Gender History (Rod is keynote!)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ~ March 5-7, 2009
Submission Deadline: November 1, 2008

The Executive Committee of the Tenth Annual Graduate Symposium on Women’s and Gender History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is pleased to announce a call for papers.  The Symposium, which is the capstone event of the History Department’s Women’s History month celebration, is scheduled for March 5-7, 2009.
 
To celebrate and encourage further work in the field of women’s and gender history, we invite submissions from graduate students from any institution and discipline.  The Symposium organizers welcome individual papers on any topic in the field of women’s and gender history; papers submitted as a panel will be judged individually. Preference will be given to scholars who did not present at last
year’s Symposium.


Continue reading "Tenth Annual Graduate Symposium on Women’s and Gender History (Rod is keynote!)" »

August 12, 2008

Call For Papers: 'Queering Anarchism'

Radical queer politics and anarchism have much in common. Queer theory
argues against traditional identity politics, recognizing the social
construction of 'sexuality' and identity categories. Anarchism argues
against any structured hierarchical arrangement of humanity that allows
some members of society to systematically exploit and oppress others.
Thus, both projects argue for a need to move beyond hierarchical and
naturalized arrangements of socially constructed identities--though, at
times, articulating those arguments in different ways. Nevertheless,
despite these commonalities, little has been written about the deep
connections between anarchism and radical queer politics. This edited
volume is an attempt to fill that gap.

With this book, the authors wish to assemble writings that are useful to
activists (i.e. not written in obscure academic jargon and relatable to
social movement contexts) working in the intersections of queer and
anarchist politics. Many anarchists use the term 'queer' as shorthand
for the LGBT community and have little understanding of what queer
theory can provide for a contemporary radical praxis and how it differs
from traditional LGBT politicsâ€"even some radical strands. Likewise,
there are many among the queer community who know little to nothing
about anarchismâ€"relying mostly on the sensationalist news medias'
construction of anarchists as terrorists, anti-organizationalists, etc.
This volume, then, will be split into three sections (theory, praxis,
and personal experience) featuring writing that deals specifically with
these intersections.

Interested authors should send a small abstract (just a paragraph
explaining exactly what it is you wish to do) along with your name and
brief bio (100 words or less, please) by August 15th to
propaganarchy@hotmail.com and rogue@riseup.net. Finished pieces will
range from 2500 to 5000 words. Below are some suggested questions and
issues for each section (feel free to come up with your own fantastic
topic too!):

Continue reading "Call For Papers: 'Queering Anarchism'" »

July 11, 2008

CFP: Intersex and Transgender in Movement!

Liminalis 2009 -- Call for Papers

Intersex and Transgender in Movement!

In the early 1990s two New Social Movements arose in the USA. These
movements rapidly became international movements under the umbrella
names "transgender" and "intersex".
Both movements have similar starting points: the diverse forms of
societal discrimination on the basis of the pathologization and
normalization of bodies, identities and performativities. In academic
literature they are subsumed under the term "New Gender Movements".
However, this term obscures the activists' different experiences,
strategies and goals and the inherent conflicts and misunderstandings
between as well as within the two movements. Potentially shared goals
such as the critique of a heternormative society are often portrayed
undifferentiatedly, the politics of the movements hereby become limited
to minority politics and their vigor is undermined.
Since its foundation Liminalis, a "journal for sex/gender emancipation",
tries to focus attention on both social movements and their specific and
diverse topics. In doing so, a non-pathologizing and non-exotisizing
engagement, which pays justice to the aims of these emancipatory social
movements is aspired. For the third edition we invite papers that
discuss the birth of transgender and intersex movements, their
development, strategies, methods and goals in a differentiated and
balanced way but also their differences and similarities, their
conflicts and collaboration. Contributions that reveal the diversity of
these movements in terms of different identities and social, political
and cultural contexts are very welcome.

Deadline for abstracts: August 30, 2008.
Deadline for papers: November 30, 2008.

wissenschaft[@]tgnb.de
www.liminalis.de

CFP: JOURNAL ISSUE on MOTHERING AND POVERTY

Call for Papers

The editorial board is seeking submissions for Vol. 11.1 of the
Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering (ARM)
to be published in Spring/Summer 2009.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: NOVEMBER 1, 2008

Maternal Health and Well-Being
(physical, psychological, social, economic, sexual, political and spiritual
issues)
The journal will explore the topic of Maternal Health and Well-Being from a
variety of perspectives and disciplines. We welcome submissions from scholars,
students, activists, health care professionals and other health workers,
artists, mothers and others who work or research in this area. Cross-cultural,
historical and comparative work is encouraged. We also welcome creative
reflections such as poetry, short stories, and artwork on the subject.

Topics can include (but are not limited to):
maternal health promotion and education; globalization and maternal health;
maternal health activism; reproductive justice; public policy and maternal
health; the environment and maternal health issues; mothers and healthy living;
maternal health and challenges within Indigenous communities; mothers with
disabilities; mothers with illnesses; HIV/AIDS; breast cancer; mental health
issues; postpartum depression; disease prevention; psychiatry; psychology;
medicine; pregnancy; childbirth; breastfeeding; young mothers; mothers and
aging; work and family balance; maternal nutrition; disordered eating;
mothering children with disabilities; violence against mothers and children;
sexual abuse, healing through the arts; addictions and recovery; raising
healthy children; politics of reproduction; abortion; sterilization; maternal
sexuality; maternal health promotion and education; LBGT maternal health
issues; menstruation; menopause; mothers and the health professions;
representations/images of mothers and health/well-being issues

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Articles should be 15 pages (3750 words).
All should be in MLA style, WordPerfect or Word and IBM compatible.
Please see our style guide for complete details.
http://www.yorku.ca/arm/styleguide.html
For more information, please contact us.

SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY
NOVEMBER 1, 2008

** TO SUBMIT WORK ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF ARM
http://www.yorku.ca/arm/armmembership.html

Please direct your submissions to:
Association for Research on Mothering (ARM)
726 Atkinson, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Phone: 416-736-2100 X60366 Email: arm@yorku.ca

We are grateful to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of
Canada
(SSHRCC) for its ongoing support of the journal.

Association for Research on Mothering (ARM)
Demeter Press
726 Atkinson, York University
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON,
Canada, M3J 1P3
416-736-2100 x60366 (fax) 416-736-5766
arm@yorku.ca
www.yorku.ca/arm

Dr. Andrea O'Reilly,
Associate Professor,
School of Women's Studies,
Director: Association for Research on Mothering,
Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, Demeter Press,
York University,
Toronto, Ont.,
M3J 1P3
416 736 2100;60366
aoreilly@yorku.ca
www.yorku.ca/arm

CFP: Latina/Chicana Mothering

CALL FOR PAPERS


Demeter Press
is seeking submissions for an edited collection on

Latina/Chicana Mothering

Publication Date: Spring 2011 Editors: Dorsía Smith Silva and Janine
Santiago

We are very excited to edit an interdisciplinary book on mothering in the
Latina
and Chicana communities. We seek papers that examine the narratives,
histories,
practices, and theories of Latina and Chicana mothering as they reflect the
realities and complexities of diverse perspectives. Latina and Chicana
mothering is a rich experience, which engenders a sense of identity, multiple
viewpoints, and cultural orientations. Here, the Latina/Chicana mothering
experience seeks to provide a site for inquiry of those life histories and
legacies, which have been marked by undergoing childbirth, raising children, or
becoming mothers, as well as transatlantic mothers. One of the main goals of
this text will be to examine the complex representations of Latina and Chicana
mothering and to address the space where Latina and Chicana perspectives are in
many cases rendered invisible.

<>We encourage varied approaches from across the humanities and social sciences
including, but not limited to topics as the following: theoretical, historical,
cultural, feminist, maternal, transgender, and gender studies; personal and
reflective essays; ethnographies; oral histories, cultural studies; literary
representation; mother activists and activism perspectives; constructions and
hybridity theories of identity and changes in identity; constructions of
ethnicity and changes in ethnicity; Latina and Chicana/mothering in global and
transnational contexts; issues of immigration, diaspora, citizenship, national
identity, embodiment theories; feminist philosophies of mothers and mothering;
film and media representations; mothering conflicts; ideological and social
debates and tensions within discussions of Latina and Chicana mothering;
mothering critiques; issues of Latina and Chicana mothering, especially as they
intersect with categories of race, discrimination, class, gender, economics,
nation, family, community, education, and language; law, political, or
scientific issues; politics and public policies; poverty; health, health care,
reproduction, and reproductive rights; the role of web communities and
technology; spiritual, cultural, emotional, communal, or social influences;
support services for Latina and Chicana mothers; self-sponsored Latina and
Chicana mothering communities and institutions; ideologies in Latino and
Chicano communities
Abstracts/Proposals (250-400 words) due October 31, 2008

Acceptances made by December 1, 2008

Accepted and completed papers (15-20 pp. double-spaced, MLA format) due: March
31, 2009

Please send inquiries and papers, along with a brief biography, to:
Editors, Dorsía Smith Silva and Janine Santiago at
latinachicanamothering@yahoo.com

<>About the Editors:

<>Dorsía Smith Silva teaches English in the College of General Studies at the
University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras. Her research and teaching focus on
Ethnic and Caribbean Literature, the Latino community and the Diaspora, and
feminism. She is the author of several articles and is the co-editor of The
Caribbean without Borders: Caribbean Literature, Language, and Culture
(Cambridge Scholars Press, 2008).
Janine Santiago is an Assistant Professor of English at University of Puerto
Rico, College of General Studies. Santiago was granted a Ph.D. in American
Studies from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2003. Her research
interests are in the areas of Gender Studies, Oral History, Caribbean Women
Writers, and Hispanic and Latino/a Literature and Popular Culture. She has
published several articles, including her work in Latinas in the United States:
A Historical Encyclopedia (2006).

July 2, 2008

FEMMSS 3: The Politics of Knowledge

University of South Carolina Women’s and Gender Studies Conference
March 19-21, 2009
In conjunction with the Association of Feminist Epistemologies, Methodologies, Metaphysics, and Science Studies

FEMMSS 3: The Politics of Knowledge

Call for abstracts for individual papers or panels

FEMMSS 3 seeks to deepen the understanding of the politics of knowledge in light of the increasing pressures of globalization, neoliberal restructuring, and militarization. Calling an array of theoretical frameworks including transnational feminism, post-colonial theory, cultural studies, epistemologies of ignorance, feminist epistemologies, and feminist science studies, this conference works to understand the ways in which knowledge is politically constituted and its material affects on people’s lives. The politics of knowledge can be discerned through the allocation and the appropriation of intellectual and natural resources, through the allocation of research funding, the control and commodification of the
health sciences and health care by multinational corporations, and the dominance of Western knowledge over that of the Two-Thirds world.

Furthermore, the politics of knowledge can be seen in the way groups and communities actively resist troubling affects of knowledge production through grass-roots organizations such as the Third World Network, community action groups, the citizens’ science movement, environmental justice groups, and the various women’s health movements.

FEMMSS continues to be concerned about the importance and difficulty of translating knowledge into action and practice. Ours is a highly interdisciplinary group of feminist scholars who pursue knowledge questions at the interstices of epistemology, methodology, metaphysics, ontology, and science and technology studies. Themes for the conference include, but are not limited to:

Whose Knowledge Matters?
• How do class, gender, race and ethnicity, disability, sexuality, and other formations of difference shape what counts as expertise, what questions are considered relevant, and which outcomes emerge from clashes and negotiations between different forms of expertise?
• How have epistemologies of ignorance emerged as important conceptual and political approaches to not only reveal patterns of active unknowing, but also to point to strategies for resistance?
• How do the material conditions of people’s lives, such as access to water, food, computers, information, and health care, enable or disable their ability to live well, produce knowledge, and engage in resistance?
Science, Knowledge and the State
• What has been the role of science and technology in fostering militarization, or in intervening in the militarization of subjectivity?
• What is the role of science in constructing historical knowledges that underpin the nation-state and justify the subordination of indigenous and/or
colonized peoples?
• What is the role of cultural production and new media in expanding democratic participation and empowerment? In constructing, controlling, and regulating populations?
• How has “certainty� been constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed in the face of technoscientific uncertainty?
Knowledges of Resistance
• What are some of the promising community-based research strategies that can help us to understand the effects that corporate control of health and health care is having?
• How do local and globally connected citizens’ groups work to reveal and resist environmental racism, globalization, and gender injustice that are generated and perhaps obscured by the production of knowledge?
• How can Western feminists and feminists from the Two-Thirds World establish symmetrical relationships that don’t replicate the patterns of colonial epistemology?
• How can we best create robust links with activists, advocates, and policy-makers?
• What are some strategies for bringing policy concerns to the work of FEMMSS and the work of FEMMSS to policy-makers?

You are invited to submit abstracts (500-word maximum) for individual presentations or panels relevant to the conference theme as well as to other issues in women’s and gender studies. Please submit the abstract of your paper or panel proposal by September 15, 2008 to:
http://www.cas.sc.edu/wost/conference.html

June 17, 2008

Call For Papers

Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, a fully-refereed journal published in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, invites the submission of high-quality interdisciplinary articles on issues pertaining to nationalism, ethnicity and related themes. Examples of these themes include:

• Masculinities and the nation
• Gender, war and violence
• Nationalism and sexuality
• Motherlands and fatherlands
• Women and right-wing movements
• Gender and ethnicity

The editors are particularly interested in the theme of gender, ethnicity and nationalism for this call.

The editors welcome submissions of work in progress as well as contributions from young professionals, post-docs and lecturers in the early stages of their career. SEN especially encourages submissions from PhD candidates. For this call, please ensure your paper reaches us by 1st September, 2008 via email (SEN@lse.ac.uk). Articles should not exceed 8,000 words (including endnotes and references), and should have a minimum length of 5,500 words.

For more information and author guidelines, please visit the SEN website:
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1473-8481

June 9, 2008

Taking Stock: Transformative Scholarship, Transforming Practices

2009 MAWSA Conference, March 27-28, 2009
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901

2009 will mark the 40th anniversary of the first glimmerings of Women’s Studies within colleges and universities across the United States. Over the past four decades, feminist scholars have transformed knowledge in the humanities, social sciences and life sciences, challenging long-established beliefs, contesting dominant paradigms, identifying new areas of research, and introducing new strategies of analysis using a complex matrix of gender, class, race, age, ethnicity, nationality and sexuality as fundamental categories of social, cultural, historical and scientific inquiry.

Simultaneously, feminist activists have mobilized in grass-root struggles in communities around the globe and within national institutions and international organizations to envision a future worthy of feminist allegiance, and to combine activism, political interventions, and policy transformations to bring that future into being. Seeking changes in consciousness, attitudes, expectations, interpersonal relations, cultural practices, social institutions, agencies of governance, and knowledge production, feminists have wrought profound changes in the world.

Taking Stock: Transformative Scholarship, Transforming Practices will examine the intellectual, political, social, and interpersonal worlds that feminists have created despite three decades of backlash. The Organizing Committee welcomes papers that address feminist efforts to reduce inequities and inequalities associated with race- and gender-based oppression; efforts to create adequate health care, education, welfare, employment, personal security and equity policies that redress gender- and race-based injustices; efforts to “engender� states by seeking gender parity and gender quotas in elective and appointive offices, constitutional guarantees of equal citizenship and equal protection of the law and policy changes to require gender mainstreaming, gender-impact analyses, gender equitable budgets, and monitoring to insure compliance with equality objectives across all policy domains; efforts to make visible women’s reproductive and domestic labor and to reduce the burden of women’s triple shift by redistributing subsistence, childcare, and community-building labor more equitably across genders; efforts to secure women’s rights as human rights, to end all forms of violence against women, and to secure reproductive freedom and sexual self-determination; efforts to transform educational and pedagogical practices; efforts to transform the arts and cultural production; and efforts to devise innovative methodologies to transform knowledge production.

Plenary sessions will feature distinguished feminist scholars and activists including Sara Ahmed, Charlotte Bunch, Florence Butegwa, Cheryl Clarke, Nikol Alexander Floyd, Paula Giddings, Carol Gilligan, Elizabeth Grosz, Alison Jaggar, Diana Tientjens Meyers, Jacqueline Pitanguy, Jasbir Puar, Cheryl Wall, and Deborah Gray White.

Please send electronic versions of paper or panel proposals to Mary Hawkesworth, mhawkes@rci.rutgers.edu, noting MAWSA 2009 Conference
Proposal in the subject head.

DEADLINE for Submissions: October 15, 2008

MAWSA 2009 Organizing Committee
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Rutgers University
162 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901

June 3, 2008

"Girls' Culture &CFP: Girls' Studies: Surviving, Reviving, Celebrating Girlhood"

INVITATION FOR PROPOSALS ON INTERDISCIPLINARY SCHOLARLY AND CREATIVE WORKCFP
Submission Deadline: Thursday, June 12, 2008
The 18th Annual Women's Studies Conference
"Girls' Culture & Girls' Studies: Surviving, Reviving, Celebrating Girlhood"

To be held on the campus of Southern Connecticut State University Friday and
Saturday, October 17 and 18, 2008



The 18th Annual Women's Studies Conference at Southern Connecticut State
University explores girlhood. What does it mean to be a girl? Who defines
girlhood in an age when puberty and sexualization are happening at younger
ages? How do girls assert their own identity in an increasingly medicated and
consumerist culture which targets girls as a prime audience? Why are U.S. girls
preoccupied with perfection? What challenges do girls across races, classes,
religions, nations, and cultures face in an ever more globalized world? What is
the relationship between girls and feminism? What effect can feminism have on
constructions of boyhood and masculinity and how in turn can this affect girls?
In the 18th annual SCSU Women's Studies conference, we will take a close look
at girls' culture and girls' studies, among the most vibrant areas in women's
studies. The Conference Committee invites individuals, groups, scholars,
feminists, activists, girls and all to
submit proposals that address topics related to all aspects of girlhood.

Proposal Format: Faculty, students, staff, administrators, community activists
from all disciplines and fields are invited to submit proposals for individual
papers, complete sessions, panels, or round tables. Poster sessions,
performance pieces, video recordings, and other creative works are also
encouraged. For individual papers, please submit a one-page abstract. For
complete panels, submit a one-page abstract for each presentation plus an
overview on the relationship among individual components. For the poster
sessions and art work, submit a one-page overview. All proposals must include
speakers' name(s), affiliation(s), and contact information (address, E-mail,
and telephone number). Please also indicate preference for Friday afternoon,
Saturday morning, or Saturday afternoon; all attempts will be made to honor
schedule requests.

Panels: Each 75 minute session usually includes three presenters and a session
moderator, but individual presenters may request an entire session for a more
substantial paper or presentation. Presenters are encouraged, though not
required, to form their own panels. The conference committee will group
individual proposals into panels and assign a moderator. Please indicate in
your contact information if you are willing to serve as a moderator.

Posters, Art Displays, and Slide Presentations: A poster presentation consists
of an exhibit of materials that report research activities or informational
resources in visual and summary form. An art display consists of a depiction
of feminist concerns in an artistic medium. Both types of presentations
provide a unique platform that facilitates personal discussion of work with
interested colleagues and allows meeting attendees to browse through highlights
of current research. Please indicate in your proposal your anticipated needs
in terms of space, etc.


In keeping with the conference theme, suggested topics include but are not
limited to:
Girls and Pop Culture
Construction of Girlhood
Media and Girls' Culture
Girls & Cutting/Self-Mutilation
Politics of Girls' Studies
Girls & Leadership
Women's Studies & Girls' Studies
Girls & Child Labor
Race & Class in Girls' Studies
Girls & Performance
Coming of Age Globally
Gender Research & Girls
Body Image and Girls
Girls & Disabilities
Girls & Sexuality
Girls & Ink.
Human Trafficking & Girls
Girls & Religion
Indigenous Women and Girls
Human Rights of Girls
Girls & Sports
Chick Lit
Girls & Resistance
Globalization and Girlhood
Race, Ethnicity, and Class in Girls' Studies
Construction of "Tween" Agers/Girls
Violence against Girls & Women
Girls and Gangs
Girl Power and Politics
Transnational Adoption of Girls
Girls' Studies in Academe
Girl Power and Feminism/Anti-Feminism
Growing up Incarcerated
Girls and Grassroots Activism
Girls across/between Worlds
Parenting/Raising Girls
American Girls and Beyond
Girls as Parents
Reviving Ophelia, Surviving Ophelia, Resisting Ophelia
Representations of Girls

We also invite your ideas and suggestions. Conference sessions will juxtapose
cultural, generational, and geopolitical perspectives in order to construct
feminist renditions of girls' cultures, histories, and representations. Expect
fun through meals, performance, and poetry slam, with girls and their allies
speaking of their struggles and power.

Please submit proposals and supporting materials to:

Women's Studies Conference Committee
Women's Studies Program, EN B 229
Southern Connecticut State University
501 Crescent Street
New Haven, CT 06515

Or via email to:

womenstudies@southernct.edu with attention to Conference Committee. If you
have any questions, please call the Women's Studies office at (203) 392-6133.

The Annual Women's Studies Conference at SCSU is self-supporting; all
presenters can pre-register at the discounted presenter's fee, not exceeding
$110.00 for both days, $60.00 for one day. The fee includes all costs for
supporting materials, entrance to keynote events, and all meals and beverage
breaks.

Submission Deadline:
Postmarked by Thursday, June 12, 2008

Notification of Committee Decision:
Mailed by Friday, July 18, 2008

June 2, 2008

Call for Submissions

Working Title: Spilling Over: A Fat, Queer Anthology
Editor: Jessica Giusti, Feminist Studies Ph.D. Student, University of Minnesota
Contact: spillingover@gmail.com
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2008

Despite the attention given by queer studies to the materiality of bodies and the cultural and social inscriptions that designate them, still a dearth of both scholarship and literature exists around intersections of gender, sexuality, and fatness. As fat studies begins to emerge as a viable academic location of inquiry, questions surface as to how fat bodies, deemed "excessive" in their trespasses of size and space, create even more complex subject positions when compounded by queer desires. This proposed anthology seeks contributions addressing junctions of "fat" and "queer" in pieces that consider the representations and resistances of non-normative corporeality and also writings considering the theoretical conceptions of these intricate subjectivities. Spilling Over will reflect the notions of excess, boundaries, and containment implied by the labels "fat" and "queer" both singularly and collectively. In the form of scholarly writing and creative non-fiction pieces, essay submissions might consider (but are not limited to):

* theorizing the concept of "excess" as it pertains to fatness and queerness
* fat and queer identities; personal narratives; reclaiming "fat" and "queer"
* notions of (in)visibility, hypervisibility, and passing and/or privilege
* intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, (dis)ability, age, and religion
* the economics of the obesity "epidemic" and the diet industry
* fat, queer art and performance; performativity
* pleasure, sex-positivity, eroticizing non-normative bodies
* acceptance movements, political activism, resistance
* the engagement of feminism with fatness
* global, transnational, transcultural constructions of fat, queer bodies and lives
* critical reflections of fatness and queerness in media, literature, film, music, and visual arts
* the rhetoric of fat oppression, fatphobia, homophobia, transphobia, bigotry, responding to and/or addressing hate speech

By December 1, 2008, please send your 2,000 – 6,000 word submission, along with your complete contact information and a 50-100 word biography, to spillingover@gmail.com with the subject line of "Spilling Over – Submission." Submissions must be received in 12 point Times New Roman font and sent in via Word documents (PDFs will not be accepted). Pieces will be reviewed and decisions made by April 2009. Please note that accepted submissions will be approved on a tentative basis, pending editorial board approval once the anthology has secured a publisher.

Questions can be directed to me at spillingover@gmail.com or visit the MySpace page at www.myspace.com/spillingoveranthology.

May 8, 2008

CFP: The Future Landscape of Sexualities (deadline: June 20, 2008)

/thirdspace: a journal of feminist theory and culture/ invites contributions
for its forthcoming issue on ‘The Future Landscape of Sexualities.’
Recognizing the central role which discussions of sexuality, identity, and
culture have played in recent feminist scholarship, this issue will consider
how sexuality informs gendered identities, as well as nodes of power
including, race, class, ability, age, culture, nation, and religion. What
does the future hold for human sexualities and sexual identities? How might
current practices, assumptions, power relations, and identities shape these
future sexualities? What new forms might sexualities evolve into in the
future? How might these future sexualities transcend/reproduce current
definitions of, and ideologies concerning, sexuality and sexual identity?

Continue reading "CFP: The Future Landscape of Sexualities (deadline: June 20, 2008)" »

April 7, 2008

MLA Convention in Mpls

The 50th Annual Convention of the Midwest Modern Language Association will be take place on November 13-16, 2008, in Minneapolis.

Call for Papers:

The Famous and Exotic in Literature and Film. There are well-known figures in literature and film that are considered exotic. What makes them exotic? What are the techniques for their representation? This session explores who and what is exotic, and the mechanisms for its representation in literature and film. Please send abstracts by April 24th to Ana Adams, Gustavus Adolphus College, aadams3@gustavus.edu

March 20, 2008

Call for Papers: Transatlantic Perspectives on American Women's History

Brunel University's Centre for American, Transatlantic and Caribbean History (CATCH) is organising a one-day conference on 7th June 2008 to discuss transatlantic perspectives on American women's history. The conference will reflect on the contours of American's women's history research today, particularly amongst scholars and postgraduates working and studying in the UK, although papers are also welcome from those researching in the United States and elsewhere. The conference will include two plenaries. One will be given by Professor Jay Kleinberg, Director of CATCH and an editor of the recently published: The Practice of US Women's History: Narratives, Intersections and Dialogues, who will address US women's history practice and practitioners in the UK. Professor of Women's and American Studies at the University of Kansas, Ann Schofield, will discuss transatlantic approaches to American women's and gender history.

The conference will consist of discussion panels, chaired by historians such as Dr. Inge Dornan (Brunel), where panellists will summarise the arguments of their pre-circulated papers and questions will follow. There will also be poster sessions where postgraduates and others can outline their research projects. The conference organisers are aware of the need for greater discussion of American women's history within the United Kingdom where innovative research is taking place. It is hoped that the papers will be published and that a network and an annual conference will be established as outcomes of this conference.

Themes of the conference could include but are not limited to:

Ethnicity and Race,
Class and Labour,
Sexuality,
Life cycles: Aging and Family,
Growing Up Female,
Social Movements,
Gender vs. Women's History,
Feminist History and Activism,
Women and Education,
Female Occupations,
Women and War.

Papers are welcome from established academics, early career scholars and postgraduates. There will be no charge for the conference which will be held at Brunel University in Uxbridge, Middlesex. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please submit a 300 word abstract by April 15th to the conference secretary, Rachel Cohen, at Rachel.Cohen@brunel.ac.uk.

February 25, 2008

CFP: Transnational Feminisms

Call for Papers
2008 GLCA Conference on Transnational Feminisms

Transnational Dialogues:
De-centering the Academic Debate on Global Feminisms

September 26-28, 2008
Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio

The internationalization of local feminisms has significantly impacted how, in recent years, research agendas are structured in the U.S. and elsewhere. Feminists from all over the globe are addressing how globalization brings about new forms of gender inequality that, in many cases, are rooted in older histories of colonialism and racism. These transnational approaches move across national boundaries to assess political, economical, and cultural shifts affecting women’s lives, and emphasize connections without necessarily creating similarities. Within the U.S., feminists of color who had experienced first hand race and class biases were the first ones to create a network that included new social movements and transnational alliances. The exclusion that women of color from different racial, ethnic, physical, national, or sexual identities experienced created the conditions that generated novel coalitional movements.

Continue reading "CFP: Transnational Feminisms" »

January 23, 2008

Call for Papers - Gender, Development and Leadership

In November 2008, a special issue of Gender & Development will focus on Gender, Development and Leadership. Gender & Development provides a opportunity for all involved in development which upholds gender equality and women's rights to reflect on their work and share learning. Published three times each year, each journal issue focuses on a particular 'hot topic' in gender and development. In addition there are resources listings and non-thematic reviews of recent publications in the field, as well as a section on Views, Events and Debates.

Continue reading "Call for Papers - Gender, Development and Leadership" »