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Analysis

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The Star-Tribune article about the proposed so-called 'pole tax' is an advance story for a local meeting.

The reporter discovered the meeting topic through public record as the Minneapolis City Council is slated to meet on the issue next month.

The story's main source is Susan Segal, Minneapolis' city attorney who proposed the bill. Much of the story content is in reference to Segal's proposal idea on an increased tax for venues offering nude entertainment.

Another source is a local attorney Randall Tigue who often represents strip clubs. This gives readers a glimpse at the other side of the story.

The story also uses other council members as sources to express third party opinions.

Diversity Analysis

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My cultural news story focuses on citizens of dual nationality.

For this analysis I will look at the article we covered in class about the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as well as a story in the Pioneer Press.

In the Giffords story the leads were very similar. The first three leads were extremly detailed and had minor changes as news updates came in. The final lead is much more condesed, most likely due to the fact that many people already knew the story.

The second story updates and adds new details to a story or if need be adds a correction. An example of an update can be found here in this Pioneer Press article. Notice how the update jumps to the top of the page, even above the lead.

In the New York Times article the response and/or changing story content was most certainly due to researching and updates from competing news outlets. So much so to a fault as the Times followed its competitors down the rabbit hole and into reporting false information. In the Pioneer Press article its updated for the correct reason, new information comming to the forefront that is ever relevant to the news story.

Numbers Analysis

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For the number analysis article we will use this Wall Street Journal article.

The story uses numbers to describe well, a number of things. First off, the article describes how long until the tax cuts will be possible with the number of days and how many of years have passed since a similar bill was introduced.

Numbers are also used to attempt to describe the U.S.'s debt, as well as how much the bill would attempt to cut. The numbers are not overly confusing, because the author does a good job of explaining the concept in layman terms and they are also used in comparisons, thus giving the reader continual perspective.

The sources of the numbers are not directly sourced, but are said to come from political parties.

Obit Analysis

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In The New York Times obituary of Andy Rooney, the sources used were CBS, the chairmen of CBS, Rooney himself, Time magazine and Walter Cronkite.

The lead for the obit is standard, unsurprisingly. Although, with such a high profile figure you wouldn't have been shocked to see them use an alternative. This method works well because the rest of the article backgrounds it nicely with loads of information.

An obit differs from a resume in a couple of very large ways. One, being that it is published after you die. The second, being that it is information presented by another person and not the person who's accomplishments are being described and graphed in detail.

Meeting Report Analysis

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The Star-Tribune article about the proposed so-called 'pole tax' is an advance story for a local meeting.

The reporter discovered the meeting topic through public record as the Minneapolis City Council is slated to meet on the issue next month.

The story's main source is Susan Segal, Minneapolis' city attorney who proposed the bill. Much of the story content is in reference to Segal's proposal idea on an increased tax for venues offering nude entertainment.

Another source is a local attorney Randall Tigue who often represents strip clubs. This gives readers a glimpse at the other side of the story.

The story also uses other council members as sources to express third party opinions.

Spot/Follow Analysis

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For this analysis I will look at the article we covered in class about the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as well as a story in the Pioneer Press.

In the Giffords story the leads were very similar. The first three leads were extremly detailed and had minor changes as news updates came in. The final lead is much more condesed, most likely due to the fact that many people already knew the story.

The second story updates and adds new details to a story or if need be adds a correction. An example of an update can be found here in this Pioneer Press article. Notice how the update jumps to the top of the page, even above the lead.

In the New York Times article the response and/or changing story content was most certainly due to researching and updates from competing news outlets. So much so to a fault as the Times followed its competitors down the rabbit hole and into reporting false information. In the Pioneer Press article its updated for the correct reason, new information comming to the forefront that is ever relevant to the news story.

Structure Analysis

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For story structure analysis the Team Hallett blog will look the Associated Press' report on the shooting in San Leandro.

The first thing that is noticeable about how the writer arranges this story is that they choose to add more information to the lead, rather than uses the second paragraph as nutgraph or refresh of the lead. Its especially odd considering the added information, the time of the shooting, is seemingly periphereal and unnecessary.

The writer uses the third paragraph to address the three deaths again and does well by using the sam paragraph to transition into the stories main voice, one of the victim's fathers.

You could this story have been ordered differently?

The answer is yes. Even though it is a professionally written story by the AP, as we learned in class even AP stories can be reworked to still fit a proper news story format. This stems from the idea that each paragraph in a news story is a fact block which are to be arranged in order of importance. Sometimes the importance of certain facts can be argued, and thus comes the possible realignment of certain story segments.

Source Analysis

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The use of sources and attribution in news stories is necessary and important.

In the international section of the Team Hallett blog, the CNN story is a good example of this.

The story includes four different sources.

These sources a spread throughout the story and include: the reporter who was based in Berlin. A press release from the Vatican. The archdiocese and finally, Der Spiegel magazine.

The writer's attribution is clear with phrases like "the statement added," "According to Der Spiegel magazine," and "the archdiocese has said."

The style of attribution is highly effective because it tells the reader concisely were the sourced information is coming from. Additionally, knowing that the writer is in Berlin can only serve to give the article that much more validity.

Lead Analysis

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"Security forces opened fire Sunday on tens of thousands of demonstrators in Yemen's capital, Sana, killing at least 26 protesters in one of the bloodiest days of the 9-month-old rebellion against President Ali Abdullah Saleh."

"Security forces", "demonstrators" - The who.
"Opened fire on tens of thousands of demonstrators" - The what.
"In Yemen's capital" - The where.
"Sunday." "9-month-old rebellion (contextual)" - The when.
"Rebellion against President Ali Abdullah Saleh" - The why.

This is a very straightforward lead and as hard-news as is it gets. However, this is to be expected and fits the story well.

What's interesting to note is the vast difference between these two leads, especially both being from such large and prestigious news outlets.

The L.A. Times lead is listed above and paints a seemingly clear picture. However, the AP report adds what would appear to be necessary information such as, 10 soldiers were killed in addition to the 26 demonstrators and that al-Qaida had links to the event.

The AP lead in full:
A new round of fierce fighting in southern Yemen killed 10 soldiers and 26 militants, military officials said Monday, the latest battle in a government campaign to retake territory from al-Qaida-linked fighters.

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