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Diversity Analysis

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The story I found is about the recovery of the Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban.

The story could have easily talked about the stereotypes of Arab-Muslims, and specifically the girl, but the story moves beyond that, and really gets to the meat of the story quickly. It is a well written feature about the miraculous recovery of this girl. It focuses on the journey that she's taken in the last month, rather than hovering on the cultural differences. It doesn't talk about how the health care in Pakistan may be different, or how living in the Middle East doomed her.

Much of the material of this story seems to come firsthand. It seems that the reporters is present in Pakistan, because it talks about the scene on the ground in Pakistan. It also uses past interviews CNN has done with the girl, and well as press releases from the UN to tell this story. The story also uses official government press releases, and information from within the hospital where the girl is being held.

Analysis of Numbers article

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For the numbers article, I found a piece about how fewer veterans are starting businesses.

The reporter talks about the percentage change of veterans that have started businesses in the last 10 years. The article also talks about the percent of veterans that use the Montgomery G.I. Bill, and how that effects the number of people who start businesses right out of the military. Finally, the article talks about the number of dollars that is available for veterans who want to start a business.

The numbers, while present in this story, are not overwhelming. The author does a great job of bringing in a lot of context and background information to the story that help make the numbers make sense. The author doesn't provide any of the raw data that leads to the percent change, but rather just provides the finished product itself. The numbers came from a study released by the Kaufman Foundation.

Analysis of Numbers article

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For the numbers article, I found a piece about how fewer veterans are starting businesses.

The reporter talks about the percentage change of veterans that have started businesses in the last 10 years. The article also talks about the percent of veterans that use the Montgomery G.I. Bill, and how that effects the number of people who start businesses right out of the military. Finally, the article talks about the number of dollars that is available for veterans who want to start a business.

The numbers, while present in this story, are not overwhelming. The author does a great job of bringing in a lot of context and background information to the story that help make the numbers make sense. The author doesn't provide any of the raw data that leads to the percent change, but rather just provides the finished product itself. The numbers came from a study released by the Kaufman Foundation.

Obituary analysis

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For my obituary analysis, I found an obit about John Reed, the former governor of Maine.

The only source that was used was a confirmation of death from the funeral home. No other sources were used in the story.

The lead is standard in that it lists who he was, what he was most notable for, and ends with his age. His death was confirmed in the second paragraph with the funeral home listed as the source. He died at the age of 91, so most likely he died of old age, and so no cause of death was listed. The news value of this man is that he used to be a governor, so he has some prominence. That is basically the only news value in this obit. However, he did not have a lot of prominence, because his list of accomplishments is only one paragraph long, and his chronology is only one paragraph as well.

Obituary analysis

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For my obituary analysis, I found an obit about John Reed, the former governor of Maine.

The only source that was used was a confirmation of death from the funeral home. No other sources were used in the story.

The lead is standard in that it lists who he was, what he was most notable for, and ends with his age. His death was confirmed in the second paragraph with the funeral home listed as the source. He died at the age of 91, so most likely he died of old age, and so no cause of death was listed. The news value of this man is that he used to be a governor, so he has some prominence. That is basically the only news value in this obit. However, he did not have a lot of prominence, because his list of accomplishments is only one paragraph long, and his chronology is only one paragraph as well.

Lance Armstrong, despite stepping down at chairman of the Livestrong Foundation, gave a speech at their gala event Friday. In an article on ABCNews.com, they cover the speech.

However, the article covered very little of the speech, and instead focused on the scandal that Armstrong has been involved in. The first paragraph of the story sets up the story, talking about him giving a speech at an event, even though he is no longer the chairman. The second paragraph gives a direct quote from him, but the quote only talks about how tough the last couple of weeks have been on him. The article also says he offered no apologies or explanations during the speech.

The rest of the article focuses on the doping scandal that has been made public recently, using a chronological order to tell the story of what happened, and ultimately why he had to step down as chairman.

The end of the article finally gets back to the event, but not the speech. Instead, they quote people at the event who are still confident in the Livestrong mission, despite the scandal that has befallen it.

Multimedia Analysis

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For the multimedia sites, I chose the CNN.com multimedia site and the New York Times multimedia site. These two sites look, feel, and operate very differently.

The CNN.com site features a 3D tour of Hemingway's house, or many other sites, as well as 360 Degree images, and lots of other cool features that you don't normally see. There is very little writing that goes with these, however, other than just brief backgrounds of what you're looking at. This site seems to be aimed more at people who are looking for a time killer, for something that they can't see themselves. They also feature a lot of historical items, like the strike on Yugoslavia, and a lot of information about elections all over the world in the past decade.

The New York Times site seems to be more geared to telling the news through pictures. They have many slideshows, including one about the VP debate from last night. There is a solid paragraph that accompanies each picture, along with a unique cutline for each photo. The photos feature not only the candidates, but also the people outside the debate hall, newscasters, and other angles you might not think of. They also have a feature that breaks down the President's and Mitt Romney's most used hand gestures, showing them to you, and explaining what they mean. The writing for this site is much more newsy than that of the CNN.com site, and seems to be more focused on informing, rather than entertaining.

For my story, I found an article about a campus officer that shot a naked freshman at a college in Alabama.

The initial lead was a very basic, breaking news type of lead that we've been writing so far in class. It had just the basic information, and nothing else. In the update, the lead talks more about the ongoing investigation, and focuses more on the question of why, then just what happened.

The first story was very short, giving very few details throughout, because very little was known. The second story is still missing a lot of detail (because it's unknown), but instead focuses on the human element. The second paragraph talks about the victim's mother, and her reaction to the incident. Also, this article starts to tell the story of what actually happened, including naming the victim. This is a big advance from the last news story, where much of the story was unknown. This story also focuses more on the mother of the victim, and how she found out and how she reacted, whereas the first story doesn't have any of this information.

For my story, I found an article about a campus officer that shot a naked freshman at a college in Alabama.

The initial lead was a very basic, breaking news type of lead that we've been writing so far in class. It had just the basic information, and nothing else. In the update, the lead talks more about the ongoing investigation, and focuses more on the question of why, then just what happened.

The first story was very short, giving very few details throughout, because very little was known. The second story is still missing a lot of detail (because it's unknown), but instead focuses on the human element. The second paragraph talks about the victim's mother, and her reaction to the incident. Also, this article starts to tell the story of what actually happened, including naming the victim. This is a big advance from the last news story, where much of the story was unknown. This story also focuses more on the mother of the victim, and how she found out and how she reacted, whereas the first story doesn't have any of this information.

Analysis of Attribution

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For my analysis, I chose an article about the leadership of the Free Syrian Army moving its base to Syria from Turkey.

The first attribution takes place in the first paragraph. The author attributes the fact that they are moving to something their leader said Saturday. It says "the leader announced" which would make it seem as though they aren't getting the information firsthand, which is true. The very beginning of the second paragraph talks about a video the leader posted on the internet, which sets up the knowledge that most of the information in the article will come from the video. I believe this is effective, because now the reader knows where the information is coming from, and isn't fooled into thinking that anyone at CNN actually sat down and did an interview with him.

The next source cited is a defense analyst for the Washington Institute of Near East Policy. The name a specific person, but again in the paragraph following this citation, we find out that the story is quoting an essay that was posted in August. This is a credible source, because it's someone who works at an official government agency, so we can trust what he says. However, I don't like that they use an essay posted in August, because the situation has changed a lot since then, and the essay doesn't talk about them moving from Turkey to Syria. I think that it would have been more effective to get a quote from this person, or someone else in the agency about the current situation, and how it will affect not only that region, but things in Washington as well.

The rest of the article is just a recap of events that have happened recently in Syria, and again, there is plenty of credible attribution. And as with the previous examples, all the attributions are taken from command statements posted in the past. This works much better, because it's just a recap, so we don't need a quote from somebody that is current, because those situations are no longer current.

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