Recently in Notable Category

Israel Votes to Secure Boarders From African Migration

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson

The Israel Cabinet voted Friday to spend $160 million on a plan that would restrict African migrants from crossing boarders illegally.

The money will go to securing southern boarders, such as the Sinai desert, where the greatest influx of immigrants come from, according to a Washington Post report.

The government estimates that approximately 50,000 Africans have entered illegally since 2006, after police attacks killed 20 people, according to a New York Times report.

The influx has caused conflict within the Israeli nation. Some fear that non-Jewish arrivals "will compromise the state's Jewish character," according to the Washington Post report. But others believe that turning away people who face persecution and conflict would contradict the nation that was built from the exile of Nazi genocide.

Though Israeli officials believe the immigrants are only looking for a better economic state, and will become a burden, others say these are refugees.

"Across the world, 88 percent of Eritrean migrants who seek asylum are recognized as refugees," said Reut Michaeli, an attorney for The Hotline for Migrant Workers in the Washington Post report. "I find it very difficult to believe that the ones who come to Israel are any different."

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu plans to raise the issue when he visits several African countries early next year, according to the New York Times report.

Evanston Ill. Decriminalizes Possession of Marijuana

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson

The 2012 budget for Evanston, Ill. decriminalized the possession of marijuana to raise revenue in the city.

Any possession under 10 grams results in a $50 to $500 dollars ticket rather than facing a misdemeanor and up to six months in jail, according to a My Fox Chicago report. The new ordinance will enable police to focus on more serious crimes.

The ordinance, which was voted on Monday night at a city council meeting, passed with a 6-3 vote, according to an Evanston Patch report.

"Cook County Commissioner John Fritchey said the city's 23,000 annual arrests for small amounts of marijuana cost the county $80 million a year, even though 90 percent of the cases are thrown out," Reuters reported.

"A one-time violation by someone with that level of possession could be a teenager or someone in college," said Alderman Donald Wilson in a Hawaii News Daily report. "I wouldn't want to see people suffer the long-term consequences of something that might just be short-term misconduct."


Occupy MN Protest Moves to Foreclosed Home

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson

Two people were arrested Saturday night on the 3300 block of 25th Ave. South in Minneapolis during an Occupy Minnesota rally.

The protesters were charged with trespassing in a foreclosed home that is being used as a platform for demonstration, according to a Fox 9 report.

Police entered the home to board up windows as protesters linked arms around the house chanting: "Banks got bailed out, we got sold out! Stop foreclosures now," according to a Minnesota Daily report.

The house belonged to university lecturer, Sara Kaiser, who thanked the protesters for protecting her house on OccupyMN livestream. Police said they are waiting to hear from the realtor and the bank since both can make a citizens arrest, according to the Fox 9 report.

A post from the OccupyMN Facebook page stated "City attorney says they can't prove who owns the house so we can't be evicted for now!"

By Alison Henderson

To cut spending in the agricultural sector, Congress is creating a new farm bill that would protect corn and soybean farmers from falling crop prices.

The bill would provide subsidies in the form of free insurance to the farmers when revenue drops or weather damages crops, according to a Fox News report.

Opponents, including environmental groups, conservatives and the American Farm Bureau, say the subsidies would pay billions of dollars to farmers that are already receiving record high incomes, according to the report.

Jon Doggett of the National Corn Growers Association said the bill is designed to cost less than current subsidy programs.

"Large crops like corn, soybeans and wheat are so integral to so many other parts of the food chain," Doggett said in the Fox News report. "You want to provide some sort of stability in that food chain."

The super committee that crafting the bill missed their self-implemented deadline of Nov. 1, because majority and minority leaders failed to reach a final agreement, according to an MPR report.

Negotiators are looking at problems raised by critics, including the potential to overpay farmers when crop prices are high, according to the Fox report.

"We have a responsibility to the American people to use their resources wisely and to provide assistance only when it's needed," U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in an Associated Press report.

Snowstorm in Northeast Causes Extended Power Outage

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson

Thousands of residents in the Northeast may face another week without power after a snowstorm swept the region last week.

The storm, barreled through several states including Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and New Jersey. 60 mph winds knocked uprooted trees into power lines, according to a New York Times report.

Connecticut Light & Power said it will get close to its goal to restore 99 percent of its customer power Sunday, according to a CBS News report.

Many, who have been without power for eight days, are staying at friend's homes, shopping malls and movie theaters, according to a Star Tribune report.

Power is expected to be restored by Sunday night, according to the CBS News report.

XL Pipeline Debate Continues in Washington

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson
The final public hearing to debate the 1,700-mile Keystone XL Pipeline, which will transport oil from Canada to Texas, took place Friday in Washington.

Voices of opposition and support were both present during the meeting, according to a report from The Guardian.

The creation of the pipeline is expected to introduce over 120,000 temporary jobs, according to an LA Times report. Supporters argue the project will increase capital and decrease dependence on foreign fuels.

An Environmental Impact Statement issued by the State Department stated that 'no significant impact" would be made, but many fear that present problems like leaks and tar pits, will only get worse.

"Wringing oil out of oil sands is a more intense process than tapping it through a conventional oil well," according to a CNN report. "Oil sands are mined like coal -- in massive open pits. These pits can leech toxins into waterways."

In terms of quality, the process is often compared to wringing out the beer from a bar rug and drinking it.

The debate is dividing Obama's political platform and will challenge supporters based on the administration's decision. Several donors have already threatened to stop support if the pipeline is approved, according to a Washington Post report.

The administration is set to make a final decision by the end of November.

By Alison Henderson
Facebook's continued changes in automatically shared information are becoming a concern on a personal level, and on a larger scale.

New Facebook features, including the Timeline feature, automatically offer personal information to other users. Tracking cookies are used to monitor activity and correlate user interests.

Two congressmen and ten consumer and privacy groups have asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate these new techniques, according to an ABC report.

Facebook representatives maintain their dedication to user security. However, several Internet experts are concerned that users will be subject to scams and information theft.

"This will make it a lot easier to obtain valuable information about an individual," Caitlin Cosoi, an researcher at anti-virus firm Bitdefender, told ABC.

Tracking occurs even after users have logged off the website, according to an MSNBC report. Any website with a "like button" will send information back to Facebook.

A Facebook statement last Thursday claimed that there was "no security or privacy breach," according to the MSNBC report.

By Alison Henderson
Facebook's continued changes in automatically shared information are becoming a concern on a personal level, and on a larger scale.

New Facebook features, including the Timeline feature, automatically offer personal information to other users. Tracking cookies are used to monitor activity and correlate user interests.

Two congressmen and ten consumer and privacy groups have asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate these new techniques, according to an ABC report.

Facebook representatives maintain their dedication to user security. However, several Internet experts are concerned that users will be subject to scams and information theft.

"This will make it a lot easier to obtain valuable information about an individual," Caitlin Cosoi, an researcher at anti-virus firm Bitdefender, told ABC.

Tracking occurs even after users have logged off the website, according to an MSNBC report. Any website with a "like button" will send information back to Facebook.

A Facebook statement last Thursday claimed that there was "no security or privacy breach," according to the MSNBC report.

Faster than Speed of Light

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson
Hoping to have made a mistake, scientists believe they discovered a particle that travels faster than the speed of light.

Neutrino, the particle in question, traveled from Geneva to a lab in Italy 1 billionth of a second faster than light, according to a report from Reuters.

If this discovery is accurate, it will disprove Einstein's Theory of Relativity and truths in modern science that are based on the theory.

"We wanted to find a mistake - trivial mistakes, more complicated mistakes, or nasty effects - and we didn't." Antonio Ereditato of the Opera collaboration told BBC News.

Though the team has measured the travel time over 16,000 times, according to the BBC report, scientists involved are looking to other colleagues to "scrutinize" their work.

Glowing Cats Assist Researchers in AIDS Study

| No Comments

By Alison Henderson
Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are looking to glowing cats for the cure to HIV and AIDS infections.
Scientists have developed a process that involves injecting a gene from monkeys into cat eggs. Kittens then produce an AIDS resistant protein in the cells that are susceptible to the disease. This gene, also known as molecule TRIM5-alpha, scans cells in the body. It then enters viral cell and blocks harmful action, according to a BBC report.
To avoid invasive testing, researchers include a jellyfish gene in the injection that causes the modified cells to glow. Shining a blue light on the kitten shows that the injection has taken hold in the cat.
Cats are the subject of this test because they are susceptible to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). Similar to HIV, FIV depletes the body's ability to fight off infection, leading to AIDs in cats.
Molecular biologist, Dr. Eric Poeschla told NPR that if the gene is able to protect against the virus, it may be used to help other mammals in the future.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the Notable category.

National is the previous category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.