The exhibit and all of the efforts of students, staff and faculty to use this as an opportunity to examine issues, ideas and new ways to communicate are done - for now.

However the issues continue and as a community committed to learning and intellectual freedom, what better place or time to explore issues and ideas. And, what better home for this exploration than the University Libraries!

For most of you (and me), we will never have access to more information - or better quality information - than we have here at the University. We have so many options for both formal learning (in classrooms) or informal learning (through open lectures, seminars and programs).

I encourage you to consider these! And, again, my thanks to everyone who came, who participated, who looked over the exhibits and this blog.

Hang in there!

Peace!

Nancy Herther

Joan Baez will be here in June and Bob Dylan just announced a new tour that will bring him to Midway Stadium in St. Paul in July. More details here. The View imagefeatures "Featuring performances by Bob Dylan and his Band, WILCO and My Morning Jacket, additional artists at select venues including Richard Thompson Electric Trio and Ryan Bingham."
But, you don't have to wait to learn more about Dylan's music and his impact on our culture, and history!
This Thursday, we have a wonderful program - free and with refreshments - with three experts talking about Dylan, Jazz and Contemporary Rock and their impact on music, politics and change!

Here are the details:


How Music Has Been Used to Influence Social Movements & Change Our World

Thursday, April 25th, 2013


4:00 - 5:30 pm


280 Ferguson Hall


Refreshments will be served


A panel moderated by music librarian Tim Maloney will discuss the impact of protest music on social movement through history.
The event coincides with the exhibit on protest music in Wilson Library, which closes April 30.

Panelists are:

Scott D. Lipscomb is currently Associate Professor and Division Head of Music Education and Music Therapy in the University of Minnesota School of Music and a member of the Board of Directors for the Learning Through Music Consulting Group. Hi is co-author of "Rock and Roll: Its History & Stylistic Development" (Pearson, 2013 - now in its 7th edition.

Scott Currie holds a master's degrees at City University of New York (Education) and New York University (Ethnomusicology), and his Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at New York University. His research to date has focused on ethnographic studies of avant-garde jazz practice in New York City and Berlin, as well as historical/ethnographic studies.

Sumanth Gopinath is Associate Professor of Music Theory. He is currently working on two book projects, one on issues of race and ethnicity in Steve Reich's music and another on the ringtone industry. He is also editing, with Jason Stanyek, the Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies. His other research interests include post-WWII (American) art- and popular musics, cultural theory (especially Marxism), intersections of politics and music (or culture generally), and the globalization of cultural production. Has written about social movements, Bob Dylan and other topics related to post-WWII music.


We hope to see you there!

War began in Darfur in 2003, with rebels taking on the central government of ignoring the region and, in effect marginalizing the ethnic minorities that lived there. Today, despite the efforts of so many global partners working to establish peace, protect the innocent (especially children) fighting between the Sudanese government and rebel forces continue.


It may seem like 'old news' to us, but the conflict and horror continue today, as you can see from any search on Darfur in a news database. A recent US State Department report is available here.

How can we relate to the situation there? Musa Wakhungu Olaka, Holocaust and Genocide Studies Center Librarian at USF Tampa Library has given the world an excellent, sobering window to this crisis at their new online exhibit.

Well worth a visit.

It's even amazing to me all of the wonderful programs, research, performances and people we have here at the U who focus not just on doing great research, but the attitude of service, sharing and performance.


I know this is just before our last Protest Music event, but I hope many of you might be able to attend this free program as well - it promises to be very powerful, using music as a way to explore a critical social issue:

Raise Your Voice: A Social Justice Recital Exploring Violence Against Women Through the Ages


Wednesday, April 24th, 2013


Stoll Thrust Theatre, Rarig Center (west bank)

7:30 PM

Raise Your Voice is unique recital performance exploring issues of Violence Against Women through the ages via art song, text, dance and staging.

Singers Laura Hynes, Beth Bayley, Elizabeth Windnagel, Sara Yoder, and Lauren Feider will be joined by dancer Samantha Phillippi - the currently reigning Miss Minneapolis, guitarist Maja Radovanlija, and pianist Mijin Choi.

Repertoire includes songs by Libby Larsen, David Evan Thomas, William Bolcom, Kurt Weill, Leonard Bernstein, Germaine Tailleferre, Benjamin Britten, Jake Heggie, Aaron Copland, Ben Moore, and Reynaldo Hahn.

The show will take place in the Stoll Thrust Theatre at Rarig Center. Admission is free.

Raise Your Voice is unique recital performance exploring issues of Violence Against Women through the ages via art song, text, dance and staging.

Singers Laura Hynes, Beth Bayley, Elizabeth Windnagel, Sara Yoder, and Lauren Feider will be joined by dancer Samantha Phillippi - the currently reigning Miss Minneapolis, guitarist Maja Radovanlija, and pianist Mijin Choi.

Repertoire includes songs by Libby Larsen, David Evan Thomas, William Bolcom, Kurt Weill, Leonard Bernstein, Germaine Tailleferre, Benjamin Britten, Jake Heggie, Aaron Copland, Ben Moore, and Reynaldo Hahn.


This event is sponsored by a Community Engagement grant through the School of Music, and by the Aurora Center for Advocacy and Education.

Our Protest Music event Wednesday was absolutely fabulous! We were able to welcome people from the larger community as well. Mark Pedelty was able to spend part of the morning at Minnesota Public Radio talking with the hosts and call-in guests about music, protest and our program! The radio program is available at this link. Great information, insight and dialogue!

However, as Yogi Berra said, 'it ain't over 'til it's over.' And we have one last, amazing program to share with you!


How Music Has Been Used to Influence Social Movements & Change Our World


Thursday, April 25th, 2013


4:00 - 5:30 pm


280 Ferguson Hall


Refreshments will be served


A panel moderated by music librarian Tim Maloney will discuss the impact of protest music on social movement through history.

The event coincides with the exhibit on protest music in Wilson Library, which closes April 30.

Panelists are:

Scott D. Lipscomb is currently Associate Professor and Division Head of Music Education and Music Therapy in the University of Minnesota School of Music and a member of the Board of Directors for the Learning Through Music Consulting Group. Hi is co-author of "Rock and Roll: Its History & Stylistic Development" (Pearson, 2013 - now in its 7th edition.

Scott Currie holds a master's degrees at City University of New York (Education) and New York University (Ethnomusicology), and his Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at New York University. His research to date has focused on ethnographic studies of avant-garde jazz practice in New York City and Berlin, as well as historical/ethnographic studies.

Sumanth Gopinath is Associate Professor of Music Theory. He is currently working on two book projects, one on issues of race and ethnicity in Steve Reich's music and another on the ringtone industry. He is also editing, with Jason Stanyek, the Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies. His other research interests include post-WWII (American) art- and popular musics, cultural theory (especially Marxism), intersections of politics and music (or culture generally), and the globalization of cultural production. Has written about social movements, Bob Dylan and other topics related to post-WWII music.


We hope to see you there!

After Wednesday's wonderful Teach-In, follow this up with another great event:

United in Anger: The History of ACT UP and the Politics of HIV/AIDS
Thursday, April 18, 2013
6:30-8:30pm
275 Nicholson Hall (East Bank)

Join us for an event featuring clips from the documentary "United in Anger: A History of ACT UP" and a discussion with director Jim Hubbard, historian Jennifer Brier, and Keith Henry, M.D. Refreshments will be served.

Free and open to the public.

Protest Music Teach-In on Wednesday!

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An event too important to miss!
Concerned about the environment?
Love live music presentations?
Our program has it all!


Teach in on Protest and Environmental Music


Wednesday, April 17, 2013
4:00-5:00 pm
280 Ferguson Hall, West Bank Campus

4:00 to 4:20 p.m.: The band, Lynhurst, featuring University of Minnesota students Jacob and Matt Abdo, will perform "Greenback Dollar" and "The Times They are a Changin'." A group of students from the freshmen seminar class in COMM 1901, Environmental Communication, will lead a discussion.

4:20 to 4:40 p.m.: Two students from COMM 1901 will perform two classical pieces, followed by a discussion on classical music as protest music.

4:40 to 5:00 p.m.: Mark Pedelty's band will perform "Dump the Bosses Off Your Back" and one original song. Included will be a discussion of music as environmental protest.

Co-sponsored by the Libraries. Free and open to the public.
Refreshments, too!
Join us!

The University's School of Public Health offers programs for the wider community on key issues. The next program is one you may want to attend:p>

Tuesday, April 16 (7-9 pm, Moos Tower 2-650, East Bank)

Film: Education Under Fire (Amnesty International Documentary)

Comments by journalist Roxana Saberi
&
Panel Discussion

Education under Fire tells the story of the Baha'i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE),
an underground community-run initiative in Iran that serves young Baha'is
who are barred from university because of their religious beliefs.

Roxana Saberi is a journalist, author, speaker and human rights advocate
whose life and captivity in Iran is recounted in her book Between Two Worlds: My Life and Captivity in Iran.

Light refreshments

Sponsor: Program in Human Rights and Health, Twin Cities Baha'i Community


So, What About Muslim Women's Rights?

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Yesterday a comment on the rights of Muslim women was posted and I want to provide some information. At least for folks at the University of Minnesota, we have information about this issue from every possible direction:


  • Newspaper coverage of the current issues in France about the hijab (let alone the more comprehensive burqa) in many public places - as well as coverage from Arab presses, Arab America and elsewhere across the globe.

  • Books and other materials that can help explain the religious practices of Islam - we have over 7 million books in our collections!

  • Databases, journals and other materials from all disciplines and fields.

For more information on these take a look at this I created guide I created to Arab-American Studies which might be a good place to start for research.

We also have films - documentaries as well as dramatic titles - that touch on many of the issues involved in Muslim women's rights. Here are just a few:


  • Rights & Wrongs: The Story of Women in Islam (Women Make Movies, 2011) " For centuries the Qu'ran has been interpreted by men to suppress women, but in fact when it was written it represented an enlightened approach to women. Renowned Muslim feminist scholars and journalists, including Asra Q. Nomani, Mona Eltahawy, Azadeh Moaveni, Dr. Amina Wadud, Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl and Asma Gull Hasan, detail how from early on very different understandings of the Qu'ran lead to vastly different translations, with enormous repercussions for women living in different Islamic societies around the world. The film alternates between the history of Mohammad and his women, and issues facing women in Islam today--from wearing of the veil, to praying in the mosque, and attitudes towards domestic violence and honor killings."

  • Nazrah: A Muslim Woman's Perspective (Arab Film Distribution, 2003) - "A diverse group of Muslim women living in the Pacific Northwest discuss their views on Islam, Islam's image in the popular culture, and their feelings about women in Islamic culture."

  • Veiled Voices (Arab Film Distribution, 2009) - "Women in the Arab world are redefining their role as leaders in Islam. Veiled voices investigates the world of Muslim women religious leaders through the eyes of three women--in Lebanon, Syria and Egypt"

  • In the name of the family (Women Make Movies, 2010) - " On December 10, 2007, a 16-year-old schoolgirl, Aqsa Parvez, was strangled to death, and her father and brother are charged with her murder. Three weeks later, teenage sisters, Amina and Sarah Said, were shot to death in Dallas; their father fled the country and is still wanted for murder. Six months later a 19-year-old college student was stabbed by her brother; he was convicted and is now in jail in New York. Friends and family of the murdered girls paint a chilling portrait of the forces that led to their deaths, and Toronto schoolgirls talk about their lives of constant fear. While Muslim women organize to help girls at risk and the Imam at a Toronto mosque teaches that violence has no basis in Islam, some men continue to justify these crimes through patriarchal beliefs about family honour. This documentary challenges the traditions that lie behind the heartbreaking tragedies committed against young girls caught between two cultures in North America."

  • Women of Islam veiling and seclusion (Arab Film Distribution, 2004) - "Farheen Umar travels throughout Pakistan, Iran, Turkey and the United States to interview Muslim women about Western assumptions about the practice of wearing veils. Explores the historical origins and stereotypes about veiling and confronts common misconceptions about the tradition of covering in Muslim society."


And these are just a few of the titles that we have. Whether you want to do some indepth research or just explore for your own self-education - if you need it, we probably have it!


And we are always open to your ideas, comments & suggestions!

Concern about human rights crosses campus in many departments and disciplines. One is CLA's Institute for Global Studies, which is holding a conference this week - UNDERGRADUATE INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE - and Friday's keynote looks like an important event.


Karina Ansolabehere, a visiting professor with the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota for the 2012-13 academic year. She holds a professorship at FLACSO (Latin America Faculty of Social Sciences) in Mexico is a leading voice in the academic study of human rights and democracy in Latin America.


Her presentation is titled "Future Challenges for Human Rights in Mexico" and will be held in 1210 Heller Hall this Friday, April 5th, 12:30-1:30pm.


So, What's up with Human Rights in Mexico?


A February article inn the New York Times notes that:


"Nearly 150 people and possibly hundreds more have disappeared at the hands of Mexico's police and military during the drug war with little or no investigation of the cases, a human rights group said Wednesday, as it called on the new government to account for the country's missing."


That report comes from the Human Rights Watch.


We may not have disappearances like that today in the U.S., but around the world, many people live in fear today. However, that was certainly the situation for many Blacks and other civil rights workers in the American South 50 years ago.


Those who ignore history, as George Santayana pointed out, are bound to see it repeated.


A program certainly worth an hour of your time!


Peace!

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