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October 24, 2006

Opposition

I suppose that there are many oppositions and conflicts around me. however, I will have to just pick the first one that comes to mind. This is the conflict between buildings and people. Yes, I think that we are in a constant struggle for power with buildings. After all, the reason that we fork over the serious comissions for buildings is to make a statement. What better way to make a statement than with an overwhelming and intimidating building. It is true that many buildings do control and intimidate building. That is their purpose. Corporate headquarters, admissions buildings, massive highschools, etc... are all delivering a message of control to their occupants. Another example of this power struggle is Roman Architecture. Massive columns and steps that are made to the scale of gods are all meant to belittle the occupants. If you are on the same side as the administrators of a building, you are impressed by its grand scale and decoration; if you are on the opposing side, you are intimidated and controled into submission simply by entering the building. Yes, this struggle is brutle. Another example of this control is with Northrupt Auditorium and the other buildings of the mall. They all have massive ionic columns which radiate the power and superiority of knowledge. This is all unconscious, but buildings do greatly influence and sometimes cause conflict with the occupant's attitudes. Solutions? Make more visitor-friendly buildings. Don't be over-the-top, with imposing structures like the massive curtain walls of a skyscraper or the huge facades with pediments and grand columns of the great empire. There is no need for this rough feel. I think that more modern buildings could improve upon this idea. Buildings can still be impressive if they are more humanly, inviting, and soft. But then where would the fun be of intimidating those who enter your building out of reluctance?

October 15, 2006

Gel Pen

"Find a thing, document its framework and clockwork, and define its phionomenon"...Not sure exactly how to approach this one, so I'll talk about something very simple. My Gel Pen. The framework and clockwork of a gel pen is simple. It is a physical object, who's design is easy to grasp: long, narrow, plastic, holds ink, ect... And the clockwork of a gel pen is not rocket science, either. You hold the pen vertically, ink flows down from the reservoir, and out the tip. Here is where an interesting phenomena takes place... The pen marks the page that you are writing on with ink, and you use these markings to make symbols that are used to communicate through language. Something as simple as a pen, or other similar writing instrument, has been used to communicate and document history-changing occurances. Many things that are communicated by mouth are simultaneously communicated useing a pen. Consequently, language, communication, and the pen have created our society. The pen is everywhere that there has been an important decision or agreement. But it is also every place that we encounter in everyday life. At school, the office, or any stores, there is always a pen. It goes unnoticed, but has a strange phenomenon. It is essential to our existance.

October 3, 2006

My Special Place

Many special thoughts begin with a place. As the Genius Local artical portrays, it is often helpful for a thought to begin on something concrete. This inspires emotions, feelings, and memories that are greater than the concrete object or place that created them. A place is more than what you see when you visit. It is all of the senses that are instilled in your memory, long after you leave the place.

In my cause, I sadly had to leave the place that inspired most of my greatest memories from my childhood, through my adolescence. It was paradise. It was a place that was sad and happy at the same time. The place was full of adventure at times, and it was calming when it needed to be.

This place was the lakeshore of my precious home. We lived in a very small town, just outside the metro area. There, we had a dock and boats, all of which were surrounded by a sanctuary of cattails and lillys. As a kid, I got hurt there many times, in my boyish adventures. My friends called me nature boy. I knew every snake and turtle in the area, and how long it took to climb every tree in the adjacent forrest. The place was amazing, and it was all mine. This was the place where I first found love. In highschool, I asked my girlfriend of four years to be with me. Ever since, we have been happy, and I believe that haveing a relationship built around such a special place must have helped our moods. We spent many a romantic evenings watching the sunsets on a bench over the water. It was beaustiful. I still remember the smell of fresh cut grass mixed with lilacs, as the wind blew my girlfriends curly hair. It was perfect.

Then it all ended. It was good while it lasted. My parents were divorced, and we lost the house. I haven't been back. In this case, it probably wouldn't give me the same experiences as it did when it was my private sanctuary. Now I feel bitter and sad that I lost it. But you can never take away amazing memories. Memories of kids playing and catching big fish with our bare hands (literally!), and memories of love. I wouldn't take it back for the world. This special place made me who I am today.

My Special Place

Many special thoughts begin with a place. As the Genius Local artical portrays, it is often helpful for a thought to begin on something concrete. This inspires emotions, feelings, and memories that are greater than the concrete object or place that created them. A place is more than what you see when you visit. It is all of the senses that are instilled in your memory, long after you leave the place.

In my cause, I sadly had to leave the place that inspired most of my greatest memories from my childhood, through my adolescence. It was paradise. It was a place that was sad and happy at the same time. The place was full of adventure at times, and it was calming when it needed to be.

This place was the lakeshore of my precious home. We lived in a very small town, just outside the metro area. There, we had a dock and boats, all of which were surrounded by a sanctuary of cattails and lillys. As a kid, I got hurt there many times, in my boyish adventures. My friends called me nature boy. I knew every snake and turtle in the area, and how long it took to climb every tree in the adjacent forrest. The place was amazing, and it was all mine. This was the place where I first found love. In highschool, I asked my girlfriend of four years to be with me. Ever since, we have been happy, and I believe that haveing a relationship built around such a special place must have helped our moods. We spent many a romantic evenings watching the sunsets on a bench over the water. It was beaustiful. I still remember the smell of fresh cut grass mixed with lilacs, as the wind blew my girlfriends curly hair. It was perfect.

Then it all ended. It was good while it lasted. My parents were divorced, and we lost the house. I haven't been back. In this case, it probably wouldn't give me the same experiences as it did when it was my private sanctuary. Now I feel bitter and sad that I lost it. But you can never take away amazing memories. Memories of kids playing and catching big fish with our bare hands (literally!), and memories of love. I wouldn't take it back for the world. This special place made me who I am today.