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Have you ever had a time when you were complaining about a rough week that is coming up, and your friend has to make her week seem harder just to top you. In the "There Are Bitch and Hoes," article Rose says, "...stop pretending that they are victims of black women out to take their money." Do you think that black rappers complaining about their "bitches" has anything to do with one upping their fellow rapper?

The Ono and Pham reading was rad. After reading everything up to the "Asian Americans in Internet Porn" section, I felt like I was able to look at Asian's and Asian Americans in the porn industry differently. I'm still unsteady in my own opinions regarding pornography in general, but it seems like Asian-Asian pornography, whether its gay or heterosexual, is viewed by or critiqued by a more fetish type of viewership. Whether or not you agree with pornography as a whole, its a given that Asian-Asian porn is viewed as very normal by a lot of people, just like any other porn with like raced people going at it, however in our society and the portrayal of Asian and Asian Americans in our society (what Ono and Pham talked about in the beginning) makes its seem like Asian-Asian porn is viewed in a more fetish based light. Yes? No? I dont know.

Last week Jackson Katz talked about African American men using a tough guy image as a way of defending themselves and earning respect from those around them. What was interesting to me about “There Are Bitches and Hoes” is they referenced something similar regarding women. For a woman to refer to herself as a bitch gives her a feeling of being powerful. Do you agree with this the authors logic?

Major rap artists like Jay-Z and Snoop Dogg use the terms bitches and hoes very loosely in their lyrics. Rose states that these men do not have the right to use these terms because they are no longer surrounded by these types of women. Being that Jay-Z and Snoop Dogg both are married; do you think these rappers are using these words in a matter of their own opinion, or need to utilize them because they feel pressure to maintain their gangster rap image?
Also, with the relative looseness of derogatory words such as bitches, hoes, and even the “N” word being used in most rap/hop-hop song these days it seems that people are much more accepting of these words being used in our everyday vocabulary as they have taken on a new cultural meaning. Children who listen to these songs are saying these words without knowing the true meaning and therefore are absorbing false impressions of the black community. It’s probably almost impossible to ask these hip-hop artists to stop using these words in their song lyrics, but is there any way we could reverse these derogatory words cultural meaning to prevent future racial stereotyping issues?

In the reading Problematic Representations of Gender and Sexuality, the authors brings the movie Sixteen Candles into the reading. In that movie is the part when Dong is feminized by riding on "Lumberjack's" lap. "...it both feminizes Asian American men and simultaneously constructs alternative gender and sexuality as aberrant." (pg 71). How did the Asian culture take to having this played out on the movie screen? I know that the culture is very private and having a white woman take masculinity over an Asian man would be very degrading, did the Asian community see it as that?

In Tricia Rose’s article, “There are Bitches and Hoes,” she talks about how women think the “bitches and hoes” men talk about in raps don’t refer to them. She also references the Jay-Z song, “Bitches and Sisters,” where Jay-Z makes a clear distinction between promiscuous groupies (bitches) and mature, supportive women (sisters). Needless to say this kind of thinking promotes competition between women. My question is, is the idea of an independent woman being superior to a sexualized “fangirl” perpetuated in places other than hip hop? Maybe in film or sports culture?

Last week Jackson Katz talked about African American men using a tough guy image as a way of defending themselves and earning respect from those around them. What was interesting to me about “There Are Bitches and Hoes” is they referenced something similar regarding women. For a woman to refer to herself as a bitch gives her a feeling of being powerful. Do you agree with this the authors logic?

This is what Michelle wrote earlier this week and I thought it was an interesting question and I thought I would answer it and broaden it a bit. I do believe that African-American men do but up this tough exterior. I do feel like each thing we associate with there actions, it happens to be about tough, physical activities. When we play basketball, we play with fouls and courtesy. But when we play street basketball, which is mostly associated with African-American males, the rules are non-existent and fouls are no more. Anything associated with the word street has something to do with how African-Americans portray the sport/activity. Now when this applies to women, I feel the same thing applies. And I do not mean simply African American women either. Women who usually act like a bitch are people who think they are in power but in my opinion they are far from it. Girls who think they are hot and sexy are usually these people who are considered bitches, they were also spoiled from it a few times and that has given them the “right” to be a bitch. They learn soon after that this is never the case because beautiful features do not always bring the best results and attracts the wrong people. I believe women act like this because they feel it is owed to them because they are considered two minorities; black and woman. This is what they do to gain the respect of people because of what they have gone through. I wish it would work but I don’t see it happening anytime soon because people do not respond well to this. People respond well to considerable actions. People will most likely give you respect if you show them the proper respect. The golden rule is do unto other as you wish they would do unto you. If people are not considerable of your actions, then they most likely are someone who doesn’t deserve your respect.

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This page contains a single entry by Melody published on October 2, 2011 1:44 PM.

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