Recently in Goals Category

Support and Personal Achievement

| No Comments

This research took me by surprise, because when we discuss relationships and their affects, we either look at all the benefits or those areas where your significant other is obviously dragging you down, such as abusive relationships. We don't typically focus on goals and a person's affect on them. I was surprised when I read the abstract for this research, because initially it was opposite of what I would be expecting. After looking at the situations a bit more carefully though, it does make some sense.
After thinking about the statement in the introduction highlighting the fact that if you feel your partner can help you in any specific area, you are less likely to exert effort in that area, I found this to be accurate. I had an exam on Monday, and my boyfriend was coming to visit that weekend. He had taken the class already and told me he would help me study for my exam. Instead of taking time to study that week, I ended up putting it off, even though I knew I wasn't understanding a large concept of the material - because he could help me with it, I did end up putting less effort in on my own. Another example I can think of is in response to the part stating "individuals tend not to exert as much effort when they can make goal progress through more than one route". I remember in high school when we needed to do a research paper and needed 'scholarly articles'. We'd all go to the library and find books - it was a lengthy process. However, writing a term paper for one of my classes here has been a different story. Instead of working on them ahead of time, it is very easy to put things off, because I have access to all the articles online through the library site.
One thing that I questioned about this study was it's lack of gender consistency in the different experiments it conducted. In all but one experiment, they consulted only women. Would having a panel of men have produced a different result? Also, these were conducted online - does that impact how truthful the individuals were when answering? I also found it interesting in the notes that they said "Although we studied romantic relationships, such effects should hold for all interdependent relationships". Would the strength of the effects change as the types of relationships changed? I think that statement should've been backed up with a bit more research before it could be made.

Relationships Making You Lazy?

| No Comments

Reading this article I found myself reflecting on my own motivation when I have been in relationships compared to when I am not. Thinking about it, the research makes sense. Most people already try to find ways to exert the least amount of energy and effort. Therefore, it makes sense that when you have someone you feel you can rely on or that you feel can help you in achieving a goal, you may be less likely to put forth the same amount of effort you would have if you thought you could only accomplish the goal on your own. If we can have someone else pitch in their effort too, why should we be exerting the same amount of effort we would is solo? Looking back, I can find times when this proved true in my life, even though I consider myself to be a self-motivated person and a hard worker, and I'm sure everyone has done this at some point. Additionally, I the research made a lot of sense to me when it talked about the likelihood of someone to spend less time and effort on task A when if they feel it will take away from their time and or ability to perform task B. I find that I do this. For example, if I know I have a paper to right for a class due the next day but also have some reading to do that isn't due for a couple days, its pretty likely that I'm going to be doing little to none of that reading before working on my paper.

Depending on your significant other

| No Comments

While reading this article, I see that if we rely on our romantic partner too much than we become lazy to reach our goals independently. That seems really sad in my point because what will happen to oneself when their romantic partner isn't their romantic partner anymore? From the past readings, I find this ironic because it goes against other readings about a romantic partner influence on ones self. The article says that it enhances relationship commitment? How? If my boyfriend kept depending on me for things all the time when he could have done it himself, I would have been really irritated. I would be irritated at the fact that he is too lazy to complete any of his goals by himself. But there is one thing I do agree on. The influence to complete ones own goal in academic success. My boyfriend does not let me talk with him at all unless both of us are done with homework, other wise we don't get to talk at all for the rest of the day. I wouldn't say this is me depending on him but in some form, it is depending on ones significant other to reach ones goal.

But other than a romantic partner, I think a really good friend works just as well. I have a friend that I always ask for help with my writing papers and he will always come through for me. Yes I want to continue having a good friendship with him so I too will help[ him with what ever he needs help with. In a way I am making a good commitment to my friend by being a good friend to keep getting help from him in the near future. If there is no romance involved, than I think it would benefit better because we wouldn't get lazy when we try to complete our on goals.

Relationships and Goals

| No Comments

I found it extremely interesting that having a partner can cause you to actually become lazier. I would think that the opposite would be true: It seems that having another person to support you would spur one on to accomplish more with greater efficiency. I do see how this makes sense though. When my dad is on a business trip, my mom does the dishes at some point during the day. When he's home, she doesn't do the dishes because she assumes he will do them per usual. That's a perfect example of the outsourcing effect. I also thought it was interesting that partners who outsource more have a stronger relationship. Logically, it makes sense: if one person is better at a task than another, the stronger one should step up and do the task they are better at. Some of the statistics got a bit tiresome to read through, and I didn't fully understand them all, but I was able to comprehend the majority of the paper despite the slight number issues.

Goals and Relationships

| 1 Comment

Throughout our class this year we have had a lot of discussions leading to the conclusions that relationships are generally good for our health. This article was interesting because it contradicted that conclusion by stating that our partners actually demotivate us. It makes a lot of sense that when we are so comfortable with someone we would begin relying on them for help with things and expend less effort ourselves. However I think it would be great to set a common goal and work together to reach that goal. In some cases it is easier to achieve a goal if we have someone to take the steps to meeting the goal beside us. Although the article proves a partner could make us less motivated, I completely believe in the theory that if we rely heavily on our partner it provides us with a closer bond. When I read about this I immediately thought about my parents, and how they work together as a team. They rely on each other one hundred percent to run a household and to raise children. Without each other and relying heavily on one another, they would be stressed out and it would negatively affect their health.
This article was great to read but at times it did get confusing. The experiments got difficult to read, and I'm looking forward to discussing it in class tomorrow.

Romantic Partners and Goals

| 1 Comment

Although the statistics and processes of how this data and conclusions were found were a little dry and hard to follow, the results were interesting. The way that they are suggesting that couples have a "shared system of encoding and retrieving information in
which they rely on each other's memories" reminds me of sitcoms and romcoms where couples finish each other's sentences. Without their partners they are sometimes less able to express themselves. Also, the idea that people in a romantic relationship will procrastinate more because they think that they can rely on their partner to help them accomplish their goals is very interesting. Outsourcing, as they called it in the articles could be dangerous and puts a whole new spin on how someone could be dependent on their partner.

Relationships and Goals

| No Comments

Initially reading the article I was kind of surprised at their hypotheses and the data that they found from their experiments which backed it up. It's strange to think that having a significant other you believe can help you actually causes you to slack off. But after really thinking about it and finishing the article it makes sense. When you have someone you can depend on and you know who will support no matter what, it's easy to let that go to your head. You don't need to worry as much about trying to impress them and achieve your goal because you realize that they're already there for you. Not only that but they can help you achieve those goals. This thinking can lead you to do less because you might think that they'd be there to pick up the slack if really needed.
I agree completely with the fact that having a significant other who you believe can help you makes you more committed to them. Putting trust into someone to help you means that you have faith they're going to be there for you. I would be committed to someone too if I put trust into them.
In the general discussion section it says research has suggested romantic partners have a shared system of encoding and retrieving information in which they rely on each other's memories. This just seems really interesting and it'd be nice to read further on that.
It'd be interesting to see this effect on men of it still happens in different types of relationships such as long distance, or how long they've been together.

Do strong partners make you weak?

| 4 Comments

Initially when reading that supportive partners make you less motivated, I thought of social loafing. The idea makes sense, because when you feel like you have another trustworthy and competent person to rely on, you expect them to carry the weight in various situations. You know that they're there for you, and therefore you expect that they are also able to help you. The idea that surprised me was that if you rely on your partner heavily, you will develop a closer bond. Although I understand that if you feel comfortable together and can rely on each other you'll ultimately be closer, but I would think that if you rely so much on your significant other and look to them for many things, they would get annoyed and irritated at you and this would weaken your bond.
The experiments were a little difficult to follow because there was just so much information included (and various other things were cited). In experiment one, I know that it said women were only taken into account because they prioritize health and fitness goals more than men do, but this also seems to be an unfair representation. It seems like you would want at least a little male perspective so the study is not so biased.
The two greatest health goals that I have are exercising regularly and eating healthily. Having a supportive partner would help if they also had the same goals as I did. We would be able to motivate each other and work as a team to make the goals happen. I wouldn't expect that having a supportive partner would bring me down in achieving these goals unless they held much different values than I do.

Relationships and Goals

| No Comments

When I began reading the article, my initial thought was that it does not make sense that thinking of a significant other would decrease performance. If anything, it should be a motivator to do well. After reading into it a little more however, it makes total sense that the hypothesis of outsourcing would work. If I thought about how a significant other, or even if it was just a friend, would help me in a future task, I would probably expend less effort. Knowing that their support and effort would help me complete it may cause me to try less. This is essentially what they predicted. The findings on the other hypotheses also made sense to me. If your brain is tired (depleted) from another task, it makes sense that you would be more likely to outsource and rely on your partner. Also the more a person relies on their partner would tend to show a higher commitment level. If someone is willing to put that much trust and reliance into their significant other, they should be fairly committed.
It is really unfortunate that by thinking of your wonderful, supportive partner, you perform worse on a task, even though it makes sense. It is good to hear the author's opinion that while this is bad for short term goals, it could end up helping the couple by using each other to focus on one goal each. We all have a limited amount of self-regulatory ability, like we talked about in an earlier class period with the cookie and vegetable study. So if one partner focused will power on one task, and the other partner focused on another, there is potential for much more to get done. This also relates to how being in a romantic relationship can help relieve stress by sharing an emotional bond with someone and having their support.

Relationships and Goals

| No Comments

Wow, can you believe we're over half way through the semester?!

We're going to take a new tack for the article this week (and apologies for being a couple of days late for posting it--we were debating if this was a good choice). We're going to read one highly relevant (and relatively readable) original piece of research. That is, this is a traditional psychology journal article with all the usual trappings--an intro, methods and results and a discussion section.

Read it slowly and carefully and come prepared with all of your questions. Please read all of the sections of the paper, even though certain parts of them might read like gibberish (like all of the statistics), and write out the questions you have about the research (why they did X as described in the methods section? What does it mean when they say Y?). I know you're all very intelligent readers, but this is my way of saying, prepare for jargon, and let's talk about that jargon on Monday.

In the mean time, have a great week and weekend, and think carefully about how our close friends/family/partners might help us achieve (or make it harder for us to achieve) our goals (specifically our health goals!).

Psychological Science 2011 Fitzsimons.pdf

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the Goals category.

Gender is the previous category.

Grief is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Pages

Powered by Movable Type 4.31-en
This is a private blog. Please sign in