Literary and Human Rights Worlds to come together at October conference

At its core, human rights is a field of storytelling. As advocates, journalists, teachers and artists, we attempt to construct comprehensible stories out of the incomprehensible atrocities we observe through our work and study. We write to make sense of the things we've seen, to weigh the costs of our commitments to human dignity, and to remember what difference, if any, we feel we have made.

On October 10, 2011, the Human Rights Program and the Creative Writing Program are hosting a day-long series of events featuring writers, scholars, advocates, and artists from around the world. The conference, My Letter to the World: Narrating Human Rights, will explore the links between literary work, specifically memoir and the first person voice, with human rights testimony, scholarship and field work.

At its core, human rights is a field of storytelling. As advocates, journalists, teachers and artists, we attempt to construct comprehensible stories out of the incomprehensible atrocities we observe through our work and study. We write to make sense of the things we've seen, to weigh the costs of our commitments to human dignity, and to remember what difference, if any, we feel we have made.

On October 10, 2011, the Human Rights Program and the Creative Writing Program are hosting a day-long series of events featuring writers, scholars, advocates, and artists from around the world. The conference, My Letter to the World: Narrating Human Rights, will explore the links between literary work, specifically memoir and the first person voice, with human rights testimony, scholarship and field work.

Leading the conference, in coordination with Human Rights Program director, Barbara Frey, is Regents professor and acclaimed author, Patricia Hampl. The event will be held at the Coffman Union Theater, from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Monday, October 10. Featured speakers include celebrated writers Nuruddin Farah, Vesna Goldsworthy, Eva Hoffman, Annette Kobak; activist and blogger, Emin Milli, from Azerbaijan; interdisciplinary scholars including Brian Brivati and Meg Jensen from Kingston University, James Dawes from Macalester College, and Ana Forcenito, Elaine May, Kathryn Sikkink and Charlie Sugnet from the University of Minnesota.

The evening of October 10, renowned journalist and author, Philip Gourevitch, will deliver the Esther Freier Lecture at 7:00 pm. at the Coffman Union Theater. Gourevitch wrote the award winning book, We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families: stories from Rwanda. His writing about societies in conflict and other human rights topics appears as part of his regular contributions to The New Yorker, Granta, Harper's, and The New York Review of Books.

All of the events on October 10 are free and open to the public.

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This page contains a single entry by radtk078 published on August 11, 2011 7:53 PM.

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