Aryeh Neier, President of the Open Society Foundations

Thumbnail image for aneier.jpegAryeh Neier, outgoing President of the Open Society Foundations, will be speaking at McNamara Alumni Center February 28 at 7 pm. A tireless advocate for improvements in human rights globally, Neier has conducted investigations of human rights abuses in more than forty countries. He has played a leading role in the establishment of the international criminal courts that have heralded a new era of international justice.

Human Rights for the 21st Century: History, Practice, Politics

Aryeh Neier
The International Human Rights Movement: A History

February 28, 2012, 7:00 PM
McNamara Alumni Center
Maroon & Gold Room
200 Oak Street SE, Minneapolis (East Bank)


aneier.jpeg

Aryeh Neier has spent more than a half-century promoting and protecting the human rights of others. Born in Nazi Germany and a refugee at the age of two, Neier knew about violence from his earliest days. A tireless advocate for improvements in human rights globally, Neier has conducted investigations of human rights abuses in more than forty countries. He has played a leading role in the establishment of the international criminal courts that have heralded a new era of international justice.

Neier is one of the architects of the international human rights movement. He served as National Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) throughout the 1970's where he led efforts to protect the civil rights of prisoners and individuals in mental hospitals and fought for the abolition of the death penalty. Founder of Human Rights Watch, Neier was executive director during the first 12 years of that influential organization's existence. Later this year, he will be stepping down as President of the Open Society Foundations, an organization that has expanded the human rights movement through its funding partnerships across the globe.

Join us as Neier reflects upon the accomplishments and challenges of the human rights movement of which he has played such an integral part. The talk is free, open to the public, and will be followed by a reception.

Look for more information about the final speaker series event coming this spring:

April 3 - Moving Children: Child Migration in the 21st Century, Jacqueline Bhabha, executive director, Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by hrminor published on February 16, 2012 2:55 PM.

Tracking War Criminals: An Insider's View was the previous entry in this blog.

Neier: Human Rights Movement Has Affected Global Politics is the next entry in this blog.

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