Stereotypes of Enslaved Women

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Earlier in the first week in our African American Literature class when we read Family, it tells us how there are slaves who are being treated cruelly and as sex objects to their masters. As I was reading this article, there was a category that fits perfectly into Family. It made me thought of Family and a little bit of Kindred right away. The category that I found most fit into Family and Kindred is the stereotypes of enslaved women. On this category, there were two types of stereotypes shown; binary oppression and mammy.
Binary oppression is where the enslaved women have to work at the productive and reproductive labors. The productive labor is where the women works on the farms and the reproductive labor is where the women are forced to have sex with their masters and have children to be slaves for the master.
The mammy is where there is one main slave who is a woman and she is to be dedicated to the family wholeheartedly. She is the replacement wife and mother whenever the husband needs her and not the mistress. "However, because she was still considered property and was forced to do certain activities, she still fell into the objectification of slavery." (http://sites.uci.edu/slaverebellionswinter2011/enslaved-women-and-rebellion/)
After reading all this, I still chose it because it was very interesting how there are vocabularies for the roles of enslave women. I learned something new and that knowledge will be with me too because it is something that we are learning in class and outside. I also feel bad for the enslaved women because "binary oppression increased the everyday struggles of slave women and created an environment in which they fought against frequent objectification in everyday life." (http://sites.uci.edu/slaverebellionswinter2011/enslaved-women-and-rebellion/) I thought this wasn't fair for the women because they are only women and can't protect themselves from their master and mistress.

Reference:

LaFleur, Camille, J. Kenji Nishikawa, Katie Thomas, and Samiyyah Tillman. "Enslaved Women and Rebellion ยป comparative slave rebellions winter 2011." Sites@UCI -- Simple Websites & Blogs. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 July 2013.

6 Comments

This article is really interesting and meaningful for some people, because sometimes there is not many people to talk about this. I think this is a pretty good article and had a lot of useful information about the many different things that women had to go through. I think it is important to be aware of the many things and events that shaped our society and try to understand that our society is a mixture of experiences, beliefs, customs, and many other important things that shape our society the way it is.

This article is really interesting and meaningful for some people, because sometimes there is not many people to talk about this. I think this is a pretty good article and had a lot of useful information about the many different things that women had to go through. I think it is important to be aware of the many things and events that shaped our society and try to understand that our society is a mixture of experiences, beliefs, customs, and many other important things that shape our society the way it is.

I agree with you that I can't believed that as a human being, people are being categorized based on their skin color. I am surprised as well that enslaved women have names for themselves for doing what they are force to. As a woman, I don't want or never want women to be look down by men again.

This article is so powerful. It talks about real things that happen that is what makes it very meaningful. I believe you did a great job making it very clear for the readers.

First of nice connection to Family. and that is true, enslaved women are viewed differently. very strong arguments and well written.

Wow, that is really interesting that enslaved women all had different roles and how they are stereotyped. You made a strong point in here and it creates a powerful blog post! I like how you related to Family and Kindred. :)

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This page contains a single entry by yang3455 published on July 2, 2013 9:56 PM.

Safe motherhood in Jamaica: from Slavery to Self-Determination was the previous entry in this blog.

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