September 2013 Archives

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Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 2AM Classroom
Week of Oct 1st
Ayuko, Katrina, Heidi, and Sara Co-Lead Teaching

Overview: As the children are beginning to adjust and settle into our classroom routine and environment, we are starting to see budding relationships. They are starting to see the physical and social similarities and differences in each other. Many children are also talking about their homes, family, and their siblings. This time of year is also a great opportunity to dig deeper into the seasonal change that is happening at this moment. How does this weather affect us and the environment? We will be focusing on these themes that have been developing naturally in the classroom and the world around them: Fall/Autumn, My Home, and My Family. The curriculum areas are arranged to promote these themes. Morning large group times will also consist of well-known songs and songs that include languages spoken in their own homes in order to provide familiarity and help the children's transitions throughout the morning.

Expressive Arts
•Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and red, orange, and yellow color paints.
Rationale: To explore brush strokes, color mixing and fall colors.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
•Materials: Playdough, cookie cutters of homes and leaves, and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To support the children's interest in homes and fall and produce an outlet for creative expression and social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.
•Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, bingo markers, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.


Sensory
•Materials: Basters, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To begin experimenting with another tool that holds water. To develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
•Materials: Mini rain sticks and sparkle sticks.
Rational: To promote experimentation with cause and effect, sound, and how to produce sound.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
•Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home,
pictures of gourds and pumpkins, and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children
to share, feel, observe, sort, and compare and become aware of the similarities and
differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication.
*Materials: colored see through blocks, and laminated leaves on the light table.
Rationale: To explore shape, color, and transparency of the laminated leaves and colored
see through blocks. To encourage children to observe and compare the similarities and differences
of the blocks and leaves.
Skills: Observation, classification, comparison, and fine motor.


Dramatic Play
•Materials: Dollhouse with common household furniture and people dolls.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play and symbolic play with familiar house materials in manipulative form. To foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, pictures of students families, and books about families.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items and dump trucks and cement trucks.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Skirts, capes, scarves, aprons, and a mirror.
Rationale: To support pretend play, body awareness, foster social interactions, and notice similarities and differences amongst each other and help recognize the ability to change appearance with the use of the dress up clothes.
Skills: Role-play, communication, compare and contrast, cooperation, and social skills.


Math and Manipulatives
•Materials: Pictures of the children in 3x5 frames.
Rationale: To continue to encourage relationships between classmates and foster their awareness of each other. Framed pictures of the children will be placed in a visible part of the classroom where they are encouraged to notice them and examine them closer.
Skills: Social skills, turn taking, visual discrimination, communication.
•Materials: Shape sorters, puzzles, pictures of student's families,
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: visual discrimination, fine motor control, social interaction, one to one correspondence, patterning, turn taking.


Language and Literacy
•Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
*Materials: Hollow, foam, cardboard blocks, visuals of homes and buildings.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To stimulate the construction of houses with possible incorporation of construction vehicles and/or people dolls nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, fine motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts, symbolic representation.


Large Motor
•Materials: Indoors - Basket hoop, climbing equipment, monkey bars, stairs, slide, and row boats. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, rakes, shovels, broom, buckets, yellow race cars, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, and teeter totter.
Rationale: To promote social interaction, experiment with how our bodies move, and.support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development. To promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness), and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility), taking turns, negotiating, social awareness.


Large group
•Materials: name and hello songs, books, highlighting particular curriculum areas, demonstration of activities.
Rationale: To familiarize the children with each other's names, promote awareness of a variety of languages spoken at home, and begin introducing some curriculum themes that will begin to develop this week.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music
•Materials: Piano, song lists, and music demo from the piano.
Rationale: To incorporate songs that the children might be more familiar with in order to help them feel more comfortable in the classroom. To promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction. To hear music (the different tempos, volumes, feeling associated with the
song) and respond with various body movements and scarves to interpret the music.
Skills: turn taking, mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns, body awareness, large and fine motor abilities, social interactions, and the ability to hear differences in songs and music.

Snacks:
Tuesday: rice chex and milk
Friday: granola

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Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 3AM Classroom
Week of 9/30
Ayuko, Katrina, Heidi, and Sara Co-Lead Teaching

Overview: As the children are beginning to adjust and settle into our classroom routine and environment, we are starting to see budding relationships. They are starting to see the physical and social similarities and differences in each other. Many children are also talking about their homes, family, and their siblings. This time of year is also a great opportunity to dig deeper into the seasonal change that is happening at this moment. How does this weather affect us and the environment? We will be focusing on these themes that have been developing naturally in the classroom and the world around them: Fall/Autumn, My Home, and My Family. The curriculum areas are arranged to promote these themes. Morning large group times will also consist of well-known songs and songs that include languages spoken in their own homes in order to provide familiarity and help the children's transitions throughout the morning.

Expressive Arts
•Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and red, orange, and yellow color paints.
Rationale: To explore brush strokes, color mixing and fall colors.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
•Materials: Playdough, cookie cutters of homes and leaves, and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To support the children's interest in homes and fall and produce an outlet for creative expression and social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.
•Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, bingo markers, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.


Sensory
•Materials: Basters, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To begin experimenting with another tool that holds water. To develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
•Materials: Mini rain sticks and sparkle sticks.
Rational: To promote experimentation with cause and effect, sound, and how to produce sound.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
•Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home,
pictures of gourds and pumpkins, and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children
to share, feel, observe, sort, and compare and become aware of the similarities and
differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication.
*Materials: colored see through blocks, and laminated leaves on the light table.
Rationale: To explore shape, color, and transparency of the laminated leaves and colored
see through blocks. To encourage children to observe and compare the similarities and differences
of the blocks and leaves.
Skills: Observation, classification, comparison, and fine motor.


Dramatic Play
•Materials: Dollhouse with common household furniture and people dolls.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play and symbolic play with familiar house materials in manipulative form. To foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, pictures of students families, and books about families.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items and dump trucks and cement trucks.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Skirts, capes, scarves, aprons, and a mirror.
Rationale: To support pretend play, body awareness, foster social interactions, and notice similarities and differences amongst each other and help recognize the ability to change appearance with the use of the dress up clothes.
Skills: Role-play, communication, compare and contrast, cooperation, and social skills.


Math and Manipulatives
•Materials: Pictures of the children in 3x5 frames.
Rationale: To continue to encourage relationships between classmates and foster their awareness of each other. Framed pictures of the children will be placed in a visible part of the classroom where they are encouraged to notice them and examine them closer.
Skills: Social skills, turn taking, visual discrimination, communication.
•Materials: Shape sorters, puzzles, pictures of student's families,
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: visual discrimination, fine motor control, social interaction, one to one correspondence, patterning, turn taking.


Language and Literacy
•Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
*Materials: Hollow, foam, cardboard blocks, visuals of homes and buildings.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To stimulate the construction of houses with possible incorporation of construction vehicles and/or people dolls nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, fine motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts, symbolic representation.


Large Motor
•Materials: Indoors - Basket hoop, climbing equipment, monkey bars, stairs, slide, and row boats. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, rakes, shovels, broom, buckets, yellow race cars, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, and teeter totter.
Rationale: To promote social interaction, experiment with how our bodies move, and.support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development. To promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness), and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility), taking turns, negotiating, social awareness.


Large group
•Materials: name and hello songs, books, preparing for the field trip/nature walk on Wednesday, highlighting particular curriculum areas, demonstration of activities.
Rationale: To familiarize the children with each other's names, promote awareness of a variety of languages spoken at home, and begin introducing some curriculum themes that will begin to develop this week. To discuss what we might see on a nature walk and familiarizing themselves with the school environment.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music
•Materials: Piano, song lists, and music demo from the piano.
Rationale: To incorporate songs that the children might be more familiar with in order to help them feel more comfortable in the classroom. To promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction. To hear music (the different tempos, volumes, feeling associated with the
song) and respond with various body movements and scarves to interpret the music.
Skills: turn taking, mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns, body awareness, large and fine motor abilities, social interactions, and the ability to hear differences in songs and music.

Snacks:
Monday: apples and crackers
Wednesday: rice chex and milk
Friday: Granola bars

Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 3AM Classroom
Week of 9/30
Ayuko, Katrina, Heidi, and Sara Co-Lead Teaching

Overview: As the children are beginning to adjust and settle into our classroom routine and environment, we are starting to see budding relationships. They are starting to see the physical and social similarities and differences in each other. Many children are also talking about their homes, family, and their siblings. This time of year is also a great opportunity to dig deeper into the seasonal change that is happening at this moment. How does this weather affect us and the environment? We will be focusing on these themes that have been developing naturally in the classroom and the world around them: Fall/Autumn, My Home, and My Family. The curriculum areas are arranged to promote these themes. Morning large group times will also consist of well-known songs and songs that include languages spoken in their own homes in order to provide familiarity and help the children's transitions throughout the morning.

Expressive Arts
•Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and red, orange, and yellow color paints.
Rationale: To explore brush strokes, color mixing and fall colors.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
•Materials: Playdough, cookie cutters of homes and leaves, and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To support the children's interest in homes and fall and produce an outlet for creative expression and social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.
•Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, bingo markers, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.


Sensory
•Materials: Basters, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To begin experimenting with another tool that holds water. To develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
•Materials: Mini rain sticks and sparkle sticks.
Rational: To promote experimentation with cause and effect, sound, and how to produce sound.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
•Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home,
pictures of gourds and pumpkins, and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children
to share, feel, observe, sort, and compare and become aware of the similarities and
differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication.
*Materials: colored see through blocks, and laminated leaves on the light table.
Rationale: To explore shape, color, and transparency of the laminated leaves and colored
see through blocks. To encourage children to observe and compare the similarities and differences
of the blocks and leaves.
Skills: Observation, classification, comparison, and fine motor.


Dramatic Play
•Materials: Dollhouse with common household furniture and people dolls.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play and symbolic play with familiar house materials in manipulative form. To foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, pictures of students families, and books about families.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items and dump trucks and cement trucks.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Skirts, capes, scarves, aprons, and a mirror.
Rationale: To support pretend play, body awareness, foster social interactions, and notice similarities and differences amongst each other and help recognize the ability to change appearance with the use of the dress up clothes.
Skills: Role-play, communication, compare and contrast, cooperation, and social skills.


Math and Manipulatives
•Materials: Pictures of the children in 3x5 frames.
Rationale: To continue to encourage relationships between classmates and foster their awareness of each other. Framed pictures of the children will be placed in a visible part of the classroom where they are encouraged to notice them and examine them closer.
Skills: Social skills, turn taking, visual discrimination, communication.
•Materials: Shape sorters, puzzles, pictures of student's families,
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: visual discrimination, fine motor control, social interaction, one to one correspondence, patterning, turn taking.


Language and Literacy
•Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
*Materials: Hollow, foam, cardboard blocks, visuals of homes and buildings.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To stimulate the construction of houses with possible incorporation of construction vehicles and/or people dolls nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, fine motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts, symbolic representation.


Large Motor
•Materials: Indoors - Basket hoop, climbing equipment, monkey bars, stairs, slide, and row boats. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, rakes, shovels, broom, buckets, yellow race cars, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, and teeter totter.
Rationale: To promote social interaction, experiment with how our bodies move, and.support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development. To promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness), and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility), taking turns, negotiating, social awareness.


Large group
•Materials: name and hello songs, books, preparing for the field trip/nature walk on Wednesday, highlighting particular curriculum areas, demonstration of activities.
Rationale: To familiarize the children with each other's names, promote awareness of a variety of languages spoken at home, and begin introducing some curriculum themes that will begin to develop this week. To discuss what we might see on a nature walk and familiarizing themselves with the school environment.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music
•Materials: Piano, song lists, and music demo from the piano.
Rationale: To incorporate songs that the children might be more familiar with in order to help them feel more comfortable in the classroom. To promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction. To hear music (the different tempos, volumes, feeling associated with the
song) and respond with various body movements and scarves to interpret the music.
Skills: turn taking, mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns, body awareness, large and fine motor abilities, social interactions, and the ability to hear differences in songs and music.

Snacks:
Monday: apples and crackers
Wednesday: rice chex and milk
Friday: Granola bars

Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 3AM Classroom
Week of 9/30
Ayuko, Katrina, Heidi, and Sara Co-Lead Teaching

Overview: As the children are beginning to adjust and settle into our classroom routine and environment, we are starting to see budding relationships. They are starting to see the physical and social similarities and differences in each other. Many children are also talking about their homes, family, and their siblings. This time of year is also a great opportunity to dig deeper into the seasonal change that is happening at this moment. How does this weather affect us and the environment? We will be focusing on these themes that have been developing naturally in the classroom and the world around them: Fall/Autumn, My Home, and My Family. The curriculum areas are arranged to promote these themes. Morning large group times will also consist of well-known songs and songs that include languages spoken in their own homes in order to provide familiarity and help the children's transitions throughout the morning.

Expressive Arts
•Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and red, orange, and yellow color paints.
Rationale: To explore brush strokes, color mixing and fall colors.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
•Materials: Playdough, cookie cutters of homes and leaves, and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To support the children's interest in homes and fall and produce an outlet for creative expression and social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.
•Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, bingo markers, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.


Sensory
•Materials: Basters, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To begin experimenting with another tool that holds water. To develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
•Materials: Mini rain sticks and sparkle sticks.
Rational: To promote experimentation with cause and effect, sound, and how to produce sound.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
•Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home,
pictures of gourds and pumpkins, and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children
to share, feel, observe, sort, and compare and become aware of the similarities and
differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication.
*Materials: colored see through blocks, and laminated leaves on the light table.
Rationale: To explore shape, color, and transparency of the laminated leaves and colored
see through blocks. To encourage children to observe and compare the similarities and differences
of the blocks and leaves.
Skills: Observation, classification, comparison, and fine motor.


Dramatic Play
•Materials: Dollhouse with common household furniture and people dolls.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play and symbolic play with familiar house materials in manipulative form. To foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, pictures of students families, and books about families.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Familiar household kitchen items and dump trucks and cement trucks.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
•Materials: Skirts, capes, scarves, aprons, and a mirror.
Rationale: To support pretend play, body awareness, foster social interactions, and notice similarities and differences amongst each other and help recognize the ability to change appearance with the use of the dress up clothes.
Skills: Role-play, communication, compare and contrast, cooperation, and social skills.


Math and Manipulatives
•Materials: Pictures of the children in 3x5 frames.
Rationale: To continue to encourage relationships between classmates and foster their awareness of each other. Framed pictures of the children will be placed in a visible part of the classroom where they are encouraged to notice them and examine them closer.
Skills: Social skills, turn taking, visual discrimination, communication.
•Materials: Shape sorters, puzzles, pictures of student's families,
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness. To promote an awareness of different families, and the idea of a family unit. To promote a sense of identity as one's self in the context of one's family.
Skills: visual discrimination, fine motor control, social interaction, one to one correspondence, patterning, turn taking.


Language and Literacy
•Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
*Materials: Hollow, foam, cardboard blocks, visuals of homes and buildings.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To stimulate the construction of houses with possible incorporation of construction vehicles and/or people dolls nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, fine motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts, symbolic representation.


Large Motor
•Materials: Indoors - Basket hoop, climbing equipment, monkey bars, stairs, slide, and row boats. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, rakes, shovels, broom, buckets, yellow race cars, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, and teeter totter.
Rationale: To promote social interaction, experiment with how our bodies move, and.support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development. To promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness), and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility), taking turns, negotiating, social awareness.


Large group
•Materials: name and hello songs, books, preparing for the field trip/nature walk on Wednesday, highlighting particular curriculum areas, demonstration of activities.
Rationale: To familiarize the children with each other's names, promote awareness of a variety of languages spoken at home, and begin introducing some curriculum themes that will begin to develop this week. To discuss what we might see on a nature walk and familiarizing themselves with the school environment.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music
•Materials: Piano, song lists, and music demo from the piano.
Rationale: To incorporate songs that the children might be more familiar with in order to help them feel more comfortable in the classroom. To promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction. To hear music (the different tempos, volumes, feeling associated with the
song) and respond with various body movements and scarves to interpret the music.
Skills: turn taking, mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns, body awareness, large and fine motor abilities, social interactions, and the ability to hear differences in songs and music.

Snacks:
Monday: apples and crackers
Wednesday: rice chex and milk
Friday: Granola bars

FALL SESSION Lesson Plan 9-30-2013

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apples.jpg


Weekly Lesson Plan for Ross' Class
September 30 October 4, 2013
Lead Teaching These Weeks: Team-teaching Round 1

Overview: The first two weeks of school have been filed with many exciting developments! The children have quickly settled into the daily schedule and routines: easily following the flow of the day. We have also observed a quickly growing sense of classroom community - with friendships from last year picking up right where we left off, and new social connections and friendships blossoming every day! Speaking of the connections, we would love to know whom your child is talking about at home. Also, we're curious to know what recounts you are hearing from your child about the daily activities. Feel free to send an email or chat with one of the teachers briefly during drop-off and/or pick-up. The teachers have been focusing heavily on helping the children connect with one another - facilitating play themes in the dramatic play, block, and clay tables; leading daily name songs and games to help the children make the connections between the pictures they see on the picture page at home and the faces they see at school; including pictures of the children in many areas of the room (e.g. peg people in the block area, picture drawers at the writing table, "action" pictures in the content areas, etc.). And oh yes...the wild turkeys! Read more about them in the sections below!

Expressive Arts (paint, collage, clay)
• Materials: easel - primary colored paints; art table - primary colored water, pipettes, clear mixing trays, various natural and "beautiful" materials for collage (e.g. wood shavings, pinecones, seed pods, cinnamon sticks, etc.), markers, crayons, paper; clay table -clay, supportive tools (rolling pins, mallets, wood knives, pizza cutters)
• Rationale: Colored water mixing and painting at the easel have been a hit! In order to continue supporting the children's creativity and artistic expression/exploration, we will have the same materials available this week. The children's comfort levels with using the materials continues to increase, and as we know, the children will explore these materials further with repeated experiences. An effort to foster social relationships and collaboration will also be made by continuing to foster and facilitate conversations between the children at the water-mixing station.
• Skills: color recognition, creativity, fine-motor strength/coordination, artistic expression, symbolic representation, social skills, imaginative/creative play, collaborative problem solving

Sensory (water table)
• Materials: pitchers, small and large bottles/jugs, small-large funnels, funnels with transparent hoses attached, funnel stand
• Rationale: Last week, the children poured water and filled up all of the jugs at the water table. Adding funnels and hoses to their play added an exciting element of watching the water move through to the funnel or hose and come pouring out. Sharing these tools allows for opportunities to interact socially by requesting a turn, working together to fill a jug, and talking through new ideas.
• Skills: enhancing existing social connections/friendships, large/fine motor, hand-eye coordination, math concepts including spatial awareness/measurement/counting/comparing-contrasting

Science
• Materials: picture board with our class pictures, large mirrors, black markers, paper, computer (with the "Our class pictures" slideshow scrolling across the screen)
• Rationale: We started looking at the "Who am I?" question by looking at ourselves and classmates, as well! In small groups with a teacher, the children have been playing a game at the computer - trying to remember the names of the classmates as their pictures pop up on the screen (big smiles can be seen when your child sees their own picture!). While watching the pictures, many children also became inspired to start using the black markers and drawing - often drawing pictures of themselves on the paper provided. We will continue this exploration this week - taking a closer look at ourselves in relation to our classmates.
• Skills: scientific awareness building and investigation skills, observation skills, strengthening home-to-school connection, foster sense of school/classroom community, foster growing sense of self/autonomy

Dramatic Play (including the "Nook" and the cave)
• Materials: "house" furniture (e.g. stove, fridge, sink, and cupboard), plates, pretend food, shoes, fabric, stuffed animals, baby-dolls and care supplies (these are in the Nook), stuffed animals and habitat materials
• Rationale: Many children have found the dramatic play area, and continue to create new stories daily. The currently topic is revolving around "cat families." This play is bringing many children together through fun and imaginative stories! Others have found the large dollhouse another great way to recreate and tell familiar home-related stories; again, bringing many small groups of children together to play.
• Skills: imaginative/creative play, symbolic representation, fostering social relationships

Math and Manipulatives
• Materials: various seriated pegboards, nesting cups, puzzles, connectors, colored animal sorting set
• Rationale: The puzzles were a hit at the table, however we can see some are ready for new challenges. We have added new, more challenging puzzles, as well as an animal sorting set to stimulate the children's thinking related to problem solving, categorizing, and sorting. These activities also create great opportunities for children to work collaboratively.
• Skills: color recognition, seriation (i.e. stacking highest to lowest), patterning, counting, one-to-one correspondence, sorting, opportunities for collaborative problem solving

Language and Literacy
• Materials: pencils, markers, paper, envelopes, staplers, tape, Classmate Picture Drawer
• Rationale: Note writing and picture making was the popular activity at the writing table last week. We will continue to support that by adding more envelopes, but also highlight the "Classmate Picture Drawers." This is an organizer that holders individual pictures of all the children and teachers that are in/work with our class. We will talk about how using these pictures to "address" letters and pictures will help others know who the item is for and/or who it is from.
• Skills: pre-/early-literacy skills, letter recognition, introduction to storytelling, fine-motor coordination/endurance (as children hand muscles grow stronger with holding writing utensils)

Blocks
• Materials: Multi-shaped unit blocks, ramps, large hollow blocks, large marbles
• Rationale: Ramp building has been taking off in our classroom and allows for investigation of various building and science concepts; speed, balance, and gravity just to name a few. Ramp building also provides an opportunity to work on problem solving skills as children figure out how to make different track arrangements that will get their marble from the start to the finish. Children also get to work on collaboration and negotiation skills as a whole group of students create one functioning ramp together.
• Skills: large-/fine-motor skills, concepts of balance and gravity, problem solving skills (trial and error), hypothesis creating and testing

Large Motor
• Materials: in the GYM: slide and stair climber, jumping station (bolster/uneven walk to padded donut landing zone), climbing wall, monkey bars, rocking boats, beanbag throwing area
on the PLAYGROUND: climber, slides, swings, and lush grasses and tress provided by Mother Nature
• Rationale: The gym has quickly become another favorite area for most (if not all) of our children. The children have really enjoyed the teacher-led games called "Sleeping Children" and "Pop Right Up." We had a new set-up introduced last week, with running and "long-jumping-into-the-donut" area, as well as a beanbag throwing station - challenging children to aim and throw their beanbag through a high or low basket. We will continue to venture to the gym every day. As for the playground, we have had a huge development with the wild turkeys joining us on the playground! The first day we found them on our playground we helped cheer and clap them to safety off the playground. The following day, we did some careful observing - trying to figure out why they wanted to come to our playground. When continue to share our developments as the session continues!
• Skills: large-motor strength/coordination/endurance, eye-to-hand and eye-to-foot coordination, body in motion (i.e. jumping and sliding), cardiovascular strength, depth perception, turn taking, social

Special Interest (large group, music, cooking, fire drill, etc)
• The first PAC meeting is coming soon: Monday, October 7 from 7-8.30p. Be sure to look at the PAC tab on the school website (as well as in your school handbook) for more info about the PAC, as well as how to get involved.
• We have some exciting upcoming classroom events this week. On Tuesday, we will go for a walk around the school to see if we can find out where else the turkeys that "play" on our playground like to go. Also possibly on Tuesday (or later in the week), we will help one of the research teams with a game in the gym. It's not for formal recording/data collection purposes - we're just helping them get their equipment (cameras) ready for another study they hope to start soon. On Wednesday, we will make applesauce in the classroom, and have a taste-test comparing our class-made applesauce to store-bought applesauce.
• With the variable autumn weather, please continue sends jackets/sweatshirts so child can stay covered on playground if needed.

Snack
Monday - Apple slices and crackers
Tuesday - Rice cakes
Wednesday - Applesauce taste test (with homemade graham crackers)
Thursday - Rice Chex
Friday - Granola bars (possible made with Sheila!)
*All snacks served with milk/water unless otherwise noted*

Overview
The children seem to be settling into the routines of the day and have formed relationships with the teachers. Relationships between children are also beginning to form, so we are supporting these connections throughout the day as well as through specific community building activities. We have intentionally planned activities, such as the soup making, that highlight individuals and also bring children together to do something as a classroom community. Classroom community building as part of our curriculum development is especially important at this time of year when children are getting to know one another and are learning what it means to be a member of a group. Another area of focus for our curriculum will be seasonal change. The fall is rich with opportunities for observing nature's transition from warmer to cooler temperatures. To begin, we will focus on the harvesting of vegetables that have grown all summer long. The children are keenly aware of this in part because of the soup making, but also because of the playground gardens, and their experiences outside of school. A third area of focus for our curriculum focuses on stories. The children all love being read to and also act out "stories" in their dramatic play. We also notice that many works of art tell imaginative tales. We will carefully select books that connect to the children's interests and classroom topics, will promote conversation, and support creative dramatics.

Expressive Arts
-Materials: thin paint brushes, circle shapes with glue for collage, mirrors
-Rationale: To promote representational creativity, to increase awareness of circles, to provide materials that will inspire looking at the self and finding novel means of self-expression. Specifically, we hope to inspire children to study themselves in mirrors and then use found circle shapes such as bottle and jar caps to create self-portraits. This will promote community-building by highlighting similarities and differences between children's expression of themselves. The thin brushes at the easels will allow for more line detail to be incorporated into the children's paintings.
-Skills: fine motor development, representational creativity, self-expression

Sensory
-Materials: water, cups, pitchers, bottles, funnels, and containers with lids.
-Rationale: Many children have taken interest in the water table and using the materials in the water. We have noticed the children seem specifically interested in various containers with caps that they can mix and match while filling them with water.
-Skills: sensory stimulation and pleasure, fluency with objects, beginning understanding of conservations, logical reasoning and hypothesizing.

Science
-Materials: magnifying lenses, a book about vegetables, apples, pumpkin, assorted vegetables, sunflower w/seeds, Boxy the turtle, and Bart the python.
-Rationale: By creating an environment rich in natural materials children will gain awareness of Fall and the harvest season. The new items in the center will also build on interest in vegetables that was formed during our soup making process and allow the children to explore using a more scientific approach. They will be able to explore the insides and outsides of various items and start to formulate theories about seeds and growing patterns. Boxy and Bart will continue to be a focus of conversations since children are highly interested in them and their habits, such as eating.
-Skills: observing, sorting, hypothesizing, asking questions, and logical reasoning.

Math and Manipulatives
-Materials: color/shape sorter, color/shape bingo
-Rationale: We are continuing to sort and classify by shape and color in order to practice recognition and labeling. Our emphasis is currently circles. This thoughtful concentration will help us to work through each stage of the learning cycle (awareness, exploration, inquiry, utilization) before we move on to a new shape.
-Skills: Color and shape recognition, matching, one to one correspondence and whole/part relationships, fine motor development

Dramatic Play and Blocks
Materials: Three Billy Goats Gruff book, furry dress-up fabrics and hollow blocks. In the dollhouse will be a Goldilocks doll and three bear figures along with the Goldilocks and the Three Bears storybook. The unit block area will have The Three Little Pigs book with a variety of building materials.
Rationale: To encourage pretend play that is related to the theme or structure of the corresponding storybook. In both the dramatic play and doll house areas, character roles and story lines will be promoted by comparing play to the storybooks.
Skills: Role-play, pretend-play, peer-interaction, creating imaginary scenarios, comparing and contrasting, construction skills, communication, and collaboration.

Literacy/Language
Materials: Various storybooks that promote our curriculum themes such as: One, a color, shape and number book that emphasizes community, and Rainbow Fish, a story that promotes friendships, sharing and community.
Rationale: All the children in the class seem to have a love of reading and being read to so we are incorporating various stories into the other curriculum themes and learning centers throughout the classroom.
Skills: Receptive and expressive language, listening and story structure.

Large Motor/Playground
-Materials: Gym-baskets, slide, beanbags, monkey bars, donut hole, stacked mats, bolsters, climbing bars, small beanbags for throwing. Playground-Climber, garden, natural areas for exploration
-Rationale: To provide opportunities for social interaction during large motor play. In the gym the equipment is set up to support of jumping and throwing skills. On the playground we are encouraging the children to explore the gardens to observe the plants that have vegetables ready to harvest. The children have also been very interested in the milkweed plants that have gone to seed. We are facilitating conversation and wonder about seed travel.
-Skills: Throwing, hand-eye coordination, depth perception, spatial awareness, balance, jumping, upper and lower body strength, cooperative play, core strength, observation and inquiry of natural phenomena


Snack
Monday - Applesauce & graham crackers
Tuesday - Apple slices & crackers
Wednesday - Rice cakes & milk
Thursday - Rice chex & milk
Friday- Granola bars

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Weekly Lesson Plan: September 30-October 3, 2013

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Team Teaching
September 30-October 3, 2013


Overview: As the children continue to grow more comfortable with the classroom materials, routines, and expectations, very few changes are made to our weekly plan. A few enriching materials are added to different areas of the classroom to extend to play themes the children have demonstrated in the first days of school. For example, a strong group interest in making clay pizzas have led to the addition of pizza cutters and other tools that will assist in the further exploration of the play topic. Additionally, the strong interest in self-portraiture that emerged in the Science area has led to the addition of more mirrors and drawing instruments to be added to the art area as well. Meanwhile, as the student teachers begin to take more responsibility in the classroom, all teachers will continue to focus on fostering peer relationships and establishing a sense of community in our classroom.


Expressive Arts
(paint, collage, clay)

Materials: primary colors (blue, red, yellow) at the easel, natural materials for collage, markers, crayons, colored pencils, scissors, hinged mirrors, pencils and fine-tip markers. Clay: pizza cutters, spatulas, bottle caps for cutting clay.

Rationale: to explore with hands and tools to promote sensory awareness, to increase fine motor skills, to observe characteristics about our own faces and bodies, and to foster social relationships as children observe and work together with their peers. To build on previous experiences (i.e. eating or making pizza) and share ideas and experience with peers and teachers.

Skills: fine motor development (strength, coordination), creativity, symbolic representation, sensory input, color recognition, self awareness/recognition

Sensory (water table)

Materials: Water with measuring cups and miscellaneous containers for scooping and pouring, basters, and whisks

Rationale: to cooperatively work together while exploring a familiar sensory experience. To gain initial experience with a variety of science and mathematical concepts.

Skills: sensory awareness, large and fine motor development, cooperative play, social relationship building, sharing materials, hand-eye coordination, knowledge of conservation, introductory measurement concepts, cause and effect relationships.

Science

Materials: mirrors, magnifying glasses, clipboards, pictures of children's favorite foods in computer slideshow.
Rationale: to support children's curiosity about themselves and others. To create sense of identity related to personal preference. To build awareness of similarities and differences between self and others while engaging in beginning concepts of comparing and contrasting.

Skills: observation, scientific investigation and inquiry, making comparisons, emotion identification, hypothesizing, developing curiosity, drawing connections, developing identity.

Dramatic Play

Materials: housekeeping materials (furniture, dishes, food) and dress-up fabric and shoes; the nook is set as bedroom with "beds," baby dolls, and baby-care items. One cave contains stuffed woodland animals in a woodland scene. Doll house with furniture and dolls is also available near cave area.
Rationale: to allow for the expression of family life and to encourage social interaction and creative role-play while playing with familiar props.

Skills: creative role-play, peer interaction, social problem solving, symbolic representation, imaginative transformation, use of expressive and receptive language.


Math and Manipulatives

Materials: new puzzles, seriation stacker, bristle blocks, pegs and peg board, nesting cups.

Rationale: to encourage children to work with open-ended materials where they can develop understanding of size, shape, quantity, and numerals. To provide opportunities for both independent, parallel, and cooperative work. More challenging puzzles have been included to support shape and color recognition and geometrical awareness.


Skills: color recognition, shape recognition, seriating (i.e. stacking largest to smallest), one-to-one correspondence, counting, fine motor development, geometrical awareness.

Language and Literacy

Materials: the writing center has a variety of writing utensils, paper, envelopes, staplers, tape, scissors, computer/word processing program.
Rationale: to foster experiences with the alphabetic principle. To give children the opportunity to create their own stories, writings, and correspondence.
Skills: fine motor, pre-writing, letter recognition, symbolic reasoning, expressive language.

Materials: the library has books that might be familiar to the children on topics about homes, school, families, and friendship.
Rationale: to encourage cozy reading time with friends and teachers as we build relationships and rapport.

Skills: receptive language, phonological awareness, early literacy, listening, community building


Blocks

Materials: large hollow blocks, small multi-shaped unit blocks, translucent blocks, peg people, wooden cars addition: Carpet scraps for road building.

Rationale: to support children's creativity and problem solving skills, to develop mathematical skills/awareness of geometry, and to allow for opportunities for social interaction as children collaborate and build together, to support imaginative and creative exploration. Due to interest in roads and vehicles, carpet scraps are added this week to support road building and increase focus on small block building which involves fine motor skills.

Skills: large motor development, expressive creation, symbolic representation, spatial (3-D) reasoning, cooperative play, problem solving, mathematical reasoning (part-whole relationships, geometry, symmetry), fine motor skills.


Large Motor

Materials: gym--Rocking boats, wall mounted ladders, monkey bars, mat and bolster climbing station, steps and slide.
Rationale: a slightly different gym setup fosters turn-taking as well as confidence in large motor abilities.

Skills: Risk taking, climbing, coordination, upper body strength, depth perception, balance, jumping and landing, propulsion skills, balance.

Materials: playground--shovels, buckets, bikes, and wagons

Rationale: to support basic motor skills, and to promote social interaction and role play as children dig, haul, run, and pedal

Skills: upper and lower body development, physical fitness, coordination, and perceptual motor skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness)


Snack

Monday: Rice chex and dried apricots

Wednesday: apples and crackers

Thursday: granola bars

Weekly Documentation: Week of September 23, 2013

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Lesson Plan Sept. 30 - Oct. 11

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Lesson Plan Marie's Class September 30 - October 11 Marie Lead Teaching

Overview
As we move into the school year, the teachers have been delighted to see the children becoming more comfortable and confident in the classroom. While we will continue to focus on fostering peer relationships and establishing a sense of community in our classroom, we are also beginning to focus more intentionally on our curriculum. Over the next few weeks we will be bringing fall into the classroom! As teachers support the children's awareness of the changing seasons we will provide a myriad of opportunities for them to observe, explore and investigate the changes occurring around them. Cooking projects, a fall walk, and new materials at the art and science areas will provide opportunities for children to explore the concept of "fall" both inside and outside of the classroom.

Expressive Arts
-Materials: Construction paper, markers, colored pencils, crayons, tape, chalk, staplers, and glue sticks. Table top easels with red, yellow, and blue paint. A variety of circular shaped collage materials.

-Rationale: Teachers want to continue to provide a variety of materials that will inspire expression of ideas and creative design. With that in mind we have added a variety of loose parts for the children to use as collage materials at the art center. Teachers hope that the new materials will provide a unique and engaging way for the children to explore the properties of circles and spheres.

-Skills: Self-expression, creative risk-taking, understanding of shape, fine motor development, symbolic representation.

Sensory
-Materials: Water, cups, pitchers, bottles, and funnels. Small containers with caps and spouts.

-Rationale: This has been a popular area of the classroom! We will continue to have the water table in the classroom to provide a soothing sensory experience that is familiar and promotes social interactions as children negotiate sharing ideas and materials.

-Skills: Experimentation, sensory stimulation and pleasure, fluency with objects, sensory input, knowledge of physical properties

Science
-Materials: A variety of natural materials associated with the new fall season; pumpkins, gourds, a variety of fall vegetables, beautiful leaves. Magnifying glasses, paper, and colored pencils. Bart Starr the snake is now living in the science area as well!

-Rationale: Fall is (mostly) here! The teachers have added new materials to the science area to provide an opportunity for the children to explore and investigate the changes that come with the new season. Teachers will guide the children's hands-on exploration of the materials provided in the classroom and will help the children think more deeply about the changes they are observing outside by asking them a variety of prompting questions. "What changes do you notice happening outside? Do the trees look different in the summer and fall? What can we do with a pumpkin? What happens to the animals that live outside when it gets colder?" are all questions we will explore with the children.

-Skills: Observation, inquiry, knowledge about the natural world, asking questions, hypothesizing, comparing, descriptive language, reasoning

Math and Manipulatives
-Materials: Interlocking puzzles, circle stackers, mirror, number pegs, Legos

-Rationale: We will continue to provide a variety of circular manipulatives in this area of the classroom to support the children's ongoing exploration of the shape. Teachers have added Legos and wheels to the area to provide an opportunity for the children to construct their own vehicles and experience the usefulness of circles (i.e. wheels) in an organic and engaging manner.

-Skills: Number recognition, one to one correspondence, counting, color and shape recognition, matching, whole/part relationships, fine motor strength

Language and Literacy
-Materials: A variety of writing implements, paper, notebooks, and a posting of the upper and lower case alphabet. Staplers, tape dispensers, scissors. A well-stocked library with books about fall, snakes, and shapes. Red, yellow, orange and brown paper.

-Rationale: The library continues to be a popular place in the classroom. The children enjoy spending time with teachers and one another looking at books and exploring the tools at the writing center. We have added new books that reflect the children's emerging interests and will continue to support the children's exploration of the materials and tools provided.

-Skills: Tool use, letter recognition, prediction and hypothesis, reasoning, listening and receptive abilities, fine motor control, familiarity with symbol systems

Blocks
-Materials: Hollow blocks and unit blocks with small wooden cars. A variety of construction vehicles, paper, scissors and markers.

-Rationale: Several of the children in our classroom have been very interested in the construction project taking place across the street from our school. To reflect and support that interest, teachers have added construction vehicles to the block area. By adding paper, markers and scissors teachers are providing an opportunity for students to create their own street/traffic/construction signs to complement their large motor play.

-Skills: Symbolic representation, creative risk taking, construction skills, dramatic play, problem solving

Dramatic Play
-Materials: Kitchen with dishes, fruits and veggies, and open-ended fabrics that can be turned into all manner of dress up clothes. The loft pillows, stories, felt board and felt board pieces to use for storytelling. There is a dollhouse with furniture and small dolls representing family members. In the animal cave there are stuffed dogs and cats with pet homes and beds.

-Rationale: This has been a popular area of the classroom over the last few weeks. Teachers will continue to provide the materials listed above so that the children have a chance to explore this area and engage with the materials more deeply. The dramatic play area provides a rich context for social problem solving and peer negotiation.

-Skills: Role-play, peer interaction, social problem solving, creating imaginary scenarios

Large Motor
-Materials: Baskets, slide, beanbags, monkey bars, donut hole, stacked mats, bolsters, climbing bars, small beanbags for throwing

-Rationale: To provide opportunities for social interaction during large motor play. TO support jumping and throwing skills.

-Skills: Throwing, hand-eye coordination, depth perception, spatial awareness, balance, jumping, upper and lower body strength, cooperative play, core strength


Snack

Monday: Rice Checks and dried apricots
Wednesday: Granola bars
Thursday: Homemade applesauce

Fall Session 2013

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* Classroom Book readers! Come on into the classroom and read a book during large group! Share your child's favorite book from home, or choose a great book from our vast collection!

* Snack dishes! We have dish duty every Thursday afternoon. Helping us out with dishes gives the teachers extra collaboration time in the classroom. Plus, the steam off of the industrial dishwasher acts as an inexpensive facial ;)

* Organizing classroom outings! This can be a great way to build community and relationshuips outside of school. Is your family headed to the park over the weekend? Going apple picking? E-mail me with info. and we can make it a casual group event!

Weekly Documentation Sept. 23 - 27, 2013

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Your participation is one way show your child that you value their school experience and it adds richness and meaning to their activities. For those of you who have schedules that make coming into school difficult, there are other ways to participate that are conducive to creating a home-school connection. For example, there will be "homework" assignments or suggestions for connecting the school experience with what happens at home.

Some examples of ways to participate in the classroom are: facilitate special activities, share a special talent or interest, chaperone field trips, come in and prepare a snack with the children, read stories, help dress for outdoor play (snowpants/boots season), help wash snack dishes, and take laundry home to wash and dry. With respect to other involvement, I will send requests in my weekly email. I am also very open to you and hope that you come to me if you have expertise or an interest in helping facilitate activities that relate to our topics of study as outlined in the weekly plans. I would like to work together with you to find a way for you to participate in a way that is meaningful to you, your child, and the class as a whole.

Overview
It was lovely to see so many of you at the Open House! Home visits and the Open House are great ways to begin the relationship building process that will be a primary focus these first few weeks of school. Those meetings help make the transition to school easier for the children, parents and teachers. This first abbreviated week will be a period of adjustment for everyone. Getting up early and heading off to school may be exciting the first day, but may be difficult for the rest of the week. I will be taking cues from the children to figure out what kind of support each of them needs. Please talk to me if you have concerns about your child's adjustment to school.

Expressive Arts
-Materials: paint, colored pencils, markers, construction paper, scrap paper
-Rationale: To provide a variety of materials that will inspire expression of ideas and creative design.
-Skills: self-expression, creative risk-taking, fine motor development

Sensory
-Materials: water, cups, pitchers, bottles, and funnels
-Rationale: Warm water is a soothing sensory experience that is familiar and promotes social interactions as children negotiate sharing ideas and materials.
-Skills: experimentation, sensory stimulation and pleasure, fluency with objects, and beginning understanding of the concept of conservation

Science
-Materials: boxy the turtle, mystery terrarium, natural materials, magnifying lenses. On the playground we will encourage exploration of the natural areas and draw children's attention to the vegetable garden, plant and animal life.
-Rationale: Through these hands-on experiences, conversations with other children, and interactions with adults, your child will formulate their own theories and develop foundational knowledge about the natural world.
-Skills: observation, sorting, asking questions, hypothesizing, interpreting and reasoning about events

Dramatic Play
-Materials: Kitchen with dishes, fruits and veggies, and dress-up fabrics. In the animal cave there are stuffed cats, dogs, fish and bunnies.
-Rationale: To encourage social interaction and the expression of children's knowledge of family life by taking on familiar roles. The cave provides a cozy close place that promotes small group interaction.
-Skills: Role-play, peer interaction, social problem solving, creating imaginary scenarios

Math and Manipulatives
-Materials: colored circle stackers, peg boards, inset puzzles emphasizing color/shape, interlocking puzzles reflecting natural themes such as animals, plants, fruits and vegetables
-Rationale: We are starting with sorting and classifying by shape and color not only to emphasize recognition and labeling, but also to lay a foundation for later mathematical concept development.
-Skills: Color and shape recognition, matching, one to one correspondence and whole/part relationships, fine motor development

Language and Literacy
-Materials: A variety of writing implements, paper, and a posting of the upper and lower case alphabet. A well stocked library with books about animals, friends, school and families.
-Rationale: The library is placed near the couch for cozy reading time with new friends and teachers. Throughout the room there will be many opportunities to enjoy the spoken and written word.
-Skills: Letter recognition, listening and receptive abilities, fine motor control

Blocks
-Materials: hollow blocks and unit blocks
-Rationale: Children use creativity and problem solving while developing their awareness of geometry through building. Communal building with hollow blocks encourages cooperation.
-Skills: Construction skills, dramatic play, symbolic representation, problem solving

Large Motor
-Materials: Slide climber, wall mounted ladders, monkey bars, mini-trampoline, A-frame jumping station. The playground will be open for large motor activity and exploration of the natural environment.
-Rationale: A simple set-up in the gym is inviting and allows us to assess gross motor abilities and confidence.
-Skills: Risk taking, climbing, coordination, upper body strength, depth perception, balance, jumping and landing. On the playground there are opportunities for digging, hauling, pedaling, running.

Special Interest
-Morning Meeting: Music and rhythmic movement will be used to help the children learn each other's names and the classroom routines. The morning meeting also emphasizes togetherness and fosters the building of classroom community.

Daily Schedule

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7:45 - 8:30 Teacher preparation of environment and discussion

8:30 - 9:00 Children's Arrival/Discovery Time 

Teachers walk children into school and help them start the day. Children 
choose activities in the front of the room: art, sensory table, playdough or clay, science center, library, writing center, puzzles, games, building sets, blocks, or the "caves."

9:00 - 9:15 Morning Meeting/Large Group Time 

The whole class comes together to share music, movement, puppets and literature as well as new information relating to class activities, interests and projects.

9:15 - 9:30 Focus activities and Gym 

The teachers will divide the children into groups to facilitate an activity at a learning center or in the gym. The activities and groupings are chosen based on curriculum goals as well as the individual goals and interests of the children. Teachers may bring an open ended question to the group to spark curiosity and encourage exploration and inquiry related to the activity. At times a specific skill will be addressed through play based activities. One group will start in the gym before their focus activity, and others will rotate in throughout free play after their focus groups. Large motor skill development is facilitated by teachers through encouragement and engagement in motor challenges and games.

9:30 - 10:15 Free Play 

Children and teachers play together in learning centers throughout the classroom. Teachers observe, facilitate and support children's play and interactions.

10:15 - 10:25 Clean up, bathroom, and handwashing

10:25 - 10:45 Whole group snack and dress for outdoor play

10:45 -11:15 Outdoor play on the playground

The teachers intentionally set up the outdoor environment and plan activities that incorporate the children's play preferences while providing motor challenges. Specific large motor skills are addressed through group games.

11:15 -11:30 Pick-up time/End of day story reading 

Teachers wait with children and read stories until parents arrive. Children are brought to their cars for departure.

11:30 -1:00 Teacher clean up and discussion

When small groups begin, they will meet from 9:15 to 9:35 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.

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Weekly Documentation: Week of 9.17.13

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Daily Schedule 2am

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2-Day Daily Schedule
Tuesday and Friday
Ayuko's Class


7:45-8:30 Set-up and planning with assistant teachers. This includes the classroom, gym, playground and snack.

8:30-8:55 Arrival and exploration time. Self-directed activities from various learning centers will be available in front of the room. These centers include the art table, sensory table, manipulalatives, discovery and science table.

8:55-9:10 Large Group. Activities include, singing songs (good morning, name songs, etc), doing movement activities, and sharing and discussing information about interests, events, and projects that are developing during this time.

9:10-10:00 Focused activity and free play from various learning centers. Children are encouraged to participate in a specific learning center for a period of time to explore, investigate, and discover a variety of materials that are available in that area. Once the children are ready to transition, they may return to the front of the room and finish an activity started during arrival/exploration time or choose activities in the back of the room: dramatic play and block building. Music and movement spontaneously occur during the day.

10:00-10:10 Clean up and toileting.

10:10-10:15 Large group (regrouping time): The children will sing songs and/or discuss the schedule for the rest of the day.

10:15-10:30 Large motor activities in the gym (Room 40)

10:30-10:45 Hand washing and Snack. The children will begin to learn to pass out napkins and cups, pour their own drinks and serve their own snacks.

10:45-10:50 Transition from snack to the playground

10:50 -11:15 Outdoor play

11:15-11:30 Dismissal and Good-byes.

11:30-1:00 Clean up and daily meetings by teachers.

Daily schedule 3am

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3-Day Daily Schedule
Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday
Ayuko's Class

Non- small group days

7:45-8:30 Set-up and planning with assistant teachers. This includes the classroom, gym, playground and snack.

8:30-8:55 Arrival and exploration time. Self-directed activities from various learning centers will be available in front of the room. These centers include the art table, sensory table, manipulalatives, discovery and science table.

8:55-9:10 Large Group. Activities include, singing songs (good morning, name songs, etc), doing movement activities, and sharing and discussing information about interests, events, and projects that are developing during this time.

9:10-10:00 Focused activity and free play from various learning centers. Children are encouraged to participate in a specific learning center for a period of time to explore, investigate, and discover a variety of materials that are available in that area. Once the children are ready to transition, they may return to the front of the room and finish an activity started during arrival/exploration time or choose activities in the back of the room: dramatic play and block building. Music and movement spontaneously occur during the day.

10:00-10:10 Clean up and toileting.

10:10-10:15 Large group (regrouping time): The children will sing songs and/or discuss the schedule for the rest of the day.

10:15-10:30 Large motor activities in the gym (Room 40)

10:30-10:45 Hand washing and Snack. The children will begin to learn to pass out napkins and cups, pour their own drinks and serve their own snacks.

10:45-10:50 Transition from snack to the playground

10:50 -11:15 Outdoor play

11:15-11:30 Dismissal and Good-byes.

11:30-1:00 Clean up and daily meetings by teachers.


Small Group days (Wednesday and Thursday)

*Note: the schedule will change slightly once "small groups" begin.

7:45-8:30 Set-up and planning with assistant teachers.

8:30-8:55 Arrival and exploration time.

8:55-9:10 Large Group.

9:10-9:30 Small Groups.

9:30-10:05 Focused activity and free play.

10:05-10:15 Clean up and toileting.

10:15-10:30 Large motor activities in the gym.

10:30-10:45 Handwashing and Snack

10:45-10:50 Transition from snack to the playground

10:50 -11:15 Outdoor play

11:15-11:30 Dismissal and Good-byes.

11:30-1:00 Clean up and daily meetings by teachers.

Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 2AM Classroom
Weeks of 9/17 and 9/24
Ayuko Lead Teaching

Overview: The first couple of weeks will be focused on supporting the children's adjustment to the school environment, creating a positive and comfortable space where they feel safe to say goodbye to their families. As the children explore and investigate the classroom, we hope they begin to think positively of the teachers and school. Slowly we will begin to learn the routines of the classroom and give the children the support they need to make transitions throughout the morning. The materials and play areas are arranged to promote these goals, create familiarity, and encourage the development of positive relationships with classmates and teachers.


Expressive Arts
• Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and primary color paints
Rationale: To explore brush strokes and color mixing.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
• Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.
• Materials: Playdough and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To produce an outlet for creative expression and promote social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.


Sensory
• Materials: Water, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To encourage a practice of pouring and filling and develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
• Materials: Noise sticks and water/glitter sticks.
Rationale: To promote experimentation with sound and how to produce sound. To challenge children's thinking while creating a satisfying cause and effect game with teachers and peers.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
• Materials: Our Turtles, Tuck and Rainbow.
Rationale: To observe the turtles in the terrarium. To begin discussing the idea of caring for these pets as a class: What care does it entail?
Skills: Observation, prediction, comparison, classification.
• Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children to share, feel, observe, and compare and become aware of the similarities and differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication


Dramatic Play
• Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, scarves, pillows, and trucks and cars.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote social interaction, peek-a-boo games, and provide a room/cozy area to read and relax.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
• Materials: Stuffed household pets: dogs and turtles.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play with familiar animals they know or have at home. To promote social interaction among the children and teachers.
Skills: Social skills, cooperation, communication, turn taking, and role play.


Math and Manipulatives
• Materials: shape sorters, seriation and color stackers, and puzzles.
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness.
Skills: visual discrimination, turn taking, fine motor control.


Language and Literacy
• Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
• Materials: Hollow, foam, and cardboard blocks.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To be incorporated into buildings or roads for the vehicles located nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts.


Large Motor
• Materials: Indoors - Climbing equipments, stairs, slide, and trampoline. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, slide, and tools for digging and molding sand.
Rationale: To support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development and promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness) and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility).


Large group
• Materials: name songs, books, fingerplay.
Rationale: To begin a routine, familiarize the children with each other's names, and promote a beginning sense of group, community, and collaboration.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music - Music will be apparent throughout the day to support transitions and encourage participation.
• Materials: Piano
Rationale: to promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction.
Skills: turn taking, fine motor development, and mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns.


Snacks:
Tuesday 9/17 and Friday 9/20 - rice cakes
Tuesday 9/24 and Friday, 9/27: TBD

Daily Schedule

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Daily Schedule for Elizabeth's PM Class
(Shortened Day Schedule)

12:30- 12:50 Arrival and discovery time
12:50 - 1:05 Large Group
1:05 - 1:45 Free Play
1:45 - 1:55 Gym
2:00 - 2:20 Snack
2:20 - 2:30 Outside time and departure


Daily Schedule for Elizabeth's PM Class -
*This schedule does not include Small Groups, which will start during week 4 or 5 of this session.

11:45-12:30 Teacher Preparation of Environment and Discussion

12:30-12:55 Children's Arrival and Discovery Time
12:55-1:10 Large Group

1:10-2:05 Activity Time and Clean Up

2:05-2:20 Gym Time/Large Motor Time

2:20-2:40 Hand Washing and Whole Group Snack

2:40-3:15 Dress for Outdoor Play and Outdoor Play on the Playground

3:15-3:30 Pick-up and End of Day Story Reading

3:30-5:00 Teacher Clean Up and Discussion

Weekly Lesson Plan: September 18-26

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Overview: Welcome to a new school year! As we the children return to school or come for the very first time, the classroom is set up to support an enjoyable and comfortable experience for all. Simple and familiar materials are offered to encourage exploration of the classroom environment as well as facilitate connections between individuals. Each day, the teachers will attend closely to assisting the children as they build relationships with one another and establish new friendships. The classroom materials also support individual and group exploration as the children seek to answer the question "Who are we?" This question provides the children with an opportunity to delve deeply into a meaningful topic and extend their thinking about themselves, their peers, their family, and their community as the year unfolds. In the first weeks of school, the environment is thoughtfully planned to stimulate investigation as well as promote a sense of belonging, familiarity, comfort, and joy.


Expressive Arts
(paint, collage, clay)

Materials: primary colors (blue, red, yellow) at the easel, natural materials for collage, clay, markers, crayons, colored pencils, scissors

Rationale: to explore with hands and tools to promote sensory awareness, to increase fine motor skills, and to foster social relationships as children observe and work together with their peers

Skills: fine motor development (strength, coordination), creativity, symbolic representation, sensory input, color recognition

Sensory (water table)

Materials: Water with measuring cups and miscellaneous containers for scooping and pouring

Rationale: to cooperatively work together while exploring a familiar sensory experience. To gain initial experience with a variety of science and mathematical concepts.

Skills: sensory awareness, large and fine motor development, cooperative play, social relationship building, sharing materials, hand-eye coordination, knowledge of conservation, introductory measurement concepts, cause and effect relationships.

Science

Materials: mirrors, magnifying glasses, clipboards, varied "flesh tone" markers.
Rationale: to support children's curiosity about themselves and others. To identify personal characteristics related to appearance. To build awareness of similarities and differences between self and others.

Skills: observation, scientific investigation and inquiry, making comparisons, emotion identification, hypothesizing, developing curiosity.

Dramatic Play

Materials: housekeeping materials (furniture, dishes, food) and dress-up fabric and shoes; the nook is set as bedroom with "beds," baby dolls, and baby-care items. One cave contains stuffed woodland animals in a woodland scene. Doll house with furniture and dolls is also available near cave area.
Rationale: to allow for the expression of family life and to encourage social interaction and creative role-play while playing with familiar props.

Skills: creative role-play, peer interaction, social problem solving, symbolic representation, imaginative transformation, use of expressive and receptive language.


Math and Manipulatives

Materials: puzzles, seriation stacker, bristle blocks, pegs and peg board, nesting cups.

Rationale: to encourage children to work with open-ended materials where they can develop understanding of size, shape, quantity, and numerals. To provide opportunities for both independent, parallel, and cooperative work.

Skills: color recognition, shape recognition, seriating (i.e. stacking largest to smallest), one-to-one correspondence, counting, fine motor development, geometrical awareness.

Language and Literacy

Materials: the writing center has a variety of writing utensils, paper, envelopes, staplers, tape, scissors, computer/word processing program.
Rationale: to foster experiences with the alphabetic principle. To give children the opportunity to create their own stories, writings, and correspondence.
Skills: fine motor, pre-writing, letter recognition, symbolic reasoning, expressive language.

Materials: the library has books that might be familiar to the children on topics about homes, school, families, and friendship.
Rationale: to encourage cozy reading time with friends and teachers as we build relationships and rapport.

Skills: receptive language, phonological awareness, early literacy, listening, community building


Blocks

Materials: large hollow blocks, small multi-shaped unit blocks, translucent blocks, peg people, wooden cars

Rationale: to support children's creativity and problem solving skills, to develop mathematical skills/awareness of geometry, and to allow for opportunities for social interaction as children collaborate and build together, to support imaginative and creative exploration.

Skills: large motor development, expressive creation, symbolic representation, spatial (3-D) reasoning, cooperative play, problem solving, mathematical reasoning (part-whole relationships, geometry, symmetry).


Large Motor

Materials: gym--A-frame jumping station, wall mounted ladders, monkey bars, trampoline, steps and ladder.
Rationale: a simple set-up in the gym is inviting and allows the children to explore gross motor abilities and gain confidence

Skills: Risk taking, climbing, coordination, upper body strength, depth perception, balance, jumping and landing

Materials: playground--shovels, buckets, bikes, and wagons

Rationale: to support basic motor skills, and to promote social interaction and role play as children dig, haul, run, and pedal

Skills: upper and lower body development, physical fitness, coordination, and perceptual motor skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness)


Special Interest

Large Group Meeting--music and movement will be used to help the children learn each other's names and the classroom routines. This time together emphasizes togetherness and fosters the building of classroom community.

Fall Schedule 2013

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Daily Schedule for Marie's PM Class
This schedule will start on Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

Monday
11:45-12:30 Teachers meeting, environment preparation
12:30-1:00 Arrival and free exploration time
1:00-1:15 Large group
1:15-1:35 Gym
1:35-2:20 Free play
2:20-2:30 Clean up and washing hands
2:30-2:45 Snack
2:45-3:15 Get ready and outdoor play!
3:15-3:30 Pick up and Good-byes
3:30-5:00 Teachers clean up and discussion

Wednesday
11:45-12:30 Teachers meeting, environment preparation
12:30-1:00 Arrival and free exploration time
1:00-1:20 Large group
1:20-2:20 Free play
2:20-2:30 Clean up and washing hands
2:30-2:45 Snack
2:45-3:15 Get ready and outdoor play!
3:15-3:30 Pick up and Good-byes
3:30-5:00 Teachers clean up and discussion-planning meeting

Thursday
11:45-12:30 Teachers meeting, environment preparation
12:30-1:20 Arrival and free exploration time / cooking activity
1:20-1:40 Large group
1:40-2:20 Free play
2:20-2:30 Clean up and wash hands
2:30-2:45 Snack
2:45-3:15 Get ready and outdoor play!
3:15-3:30 Pick up and Good-byes
3:30-5:30 Teachers clean up and discussion-classroom set up


* Please note that we will have gym only once a week, on Mondays. We want to make sure that we take advantage of the outdoors as much as possible.

* This schedule does not include Small Group Work (we will start small group work later this session)

Lesson Plan Sept. 18 - Sept. 27

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Lesson Plan
Marie's Class
September 18- 27, 2013
Marie Lead Teaching

Overview
The materials in the classroom at the beginning of the school year are meant to be appealing and familiar to the children to help ease their transition into the new environment. Over the course of the first few weeks the student teachers and I will be observing the children and taking note of their developmental capabilities, their preferred styles of socialization and interaction, and themes that we see emerging in their play. Initially we will focus on establishing and strengthening relationships, both between children and teachers, and amongst the children themselves. As the year progresses we will begin to incorporate individual and group goals, as well as the children's ideas and interests, into our classroom curriculum. This year we will be exploring the broad
question "What Can I Do?" The teachers hope to use this question to focus on empowering the children and promoting their self-efficacy as they explore materials and engage in experiences in the classroom, the school, the community and the world around them.

Expressive Arts
-Materials: Construction paper, markers, colored pencils, crayons, tape, chalk, staplers, and glue sticks. Table top easel with red, yellow, and blue paint.
-Rationale: To provide a variety of materials that will inspire expression of ideas and creative design.
-Skills: Self-expression, creative risk-taking, fine motor development, symbolic representation.

Sensory
-Materials: Water, cups, pitchers, bottles, and funnels
-Rationale: Warm water is a soothing sensory experience that is familiar and promotes social interactions as children negotiate sharing ideas and materials.
-Skills: Experimentation, sensory stimulation and pleasure, fluency with objects, and beginning understanding of the concept of conservation

Science
-Materials: A variety of beautiful natural materials (shells, acorns, seeds, bark) and prompting questions inviting the children to examine the materials closely. Magnifying glasses, pencils, clipboards, and colored pencils. An empty animal home and prompting questions inviting the children to hypothesize about who might be coming to live in our classroom.
-Rationale: Throughout the year we will be inviting the children to closely observe and explore the world around them. The variety of beautiful natural materials in the science area provide an introduction to that investigative process. Teachers hope that the variety of patterns and textures in the materials will serve as an intrinsically motivating way to engage the children's interest and pique their curiosity. Teachers also expect that the empty animal cage will stimulate the children's interest and prompt them to ask questions. Teachers will encourage children to develop their scientific thinking skills by asking prompting questions; Who do you think will live in this cage? What do animals need to live? Could an elephant live here? Why or why not? Questions such as these provide opportunities for students to develop reasoning and critical thinking skills.
-Skills: Observation, inquiry, sorting, asking questions, hypothesizing, comparing, interpreting and reasoning about events

Math and Manipulatives
-Materials: Interlocking puzzles, circle stackers, mirror, number pegs
-Rationale: We are starting with sorting and classifying by shape and color not only to emphasize recognition and labeling, but also to lay a foundation for later mathematical concept development. We are beginning the year with a focus on "circles" and will continue to focus on specific shapes at different times throughout the year in order to provide the children with an opportunity to investigate shape and dimensions more closely.
-Skills: Color and shape recognition, matching, one to one correspondence and whole/part relationships, fine motor development

Language and Literacy
-Materials: A variety of writing implements, paper, notebooks, and a posting of the upper and lower case alphabet. A well stocked library with books about starting school, families, and friends.
-Rationale: The library is placed near the couch for cozy reading time with new friends and teachers. Throughout the room there will be many opportunities to enjoy the spoken and written word.
-Skills: Letter recognition, listening and receptive abilities, fine motor control, familiarity with symbol systems

Blocks
-Materials: Hollow blocks and unit blocks with small wooden cars.
-Rationale: Children use creativity and problem solving while developing their awareness of geometry through building. Communal building with hollow blocks encourages cooperation.
-Skills: Construction skills, dramatic play, symbolic representation, problem solving

Dramatic Play
-Materials: Kitchen with dishes, fruits and veggies, and open-ended fabrics that can be turned into all manner of dress up clothes. The loft pillows, stories, felt board and felt board pieces to use for storytelling. There is a dollhouse with furniture and small dolls representing family members. In the animal cave there are stuffed dogs and cats with pet homes and beds.
-Rationale: To encourage social interaction and the expression of children's knowledge of family life by taking on familiar roles. The cave provides a cozy close place that promotes small group interaction.
-Skills: Role-play, peer interaction, social problem solving, creating imaginary scenarios

Large Motor
-Materials: Slide climber, wall mounted ladders, monkey bars, mini-trampoline, and jumping station. The playground will be set up with shovels, buckets, bikes, and wagons. On the playground we will also encourage exploration of the natural areas and draw children's attention to the vegetable garden, plant and animal life.
-Rationale: A simple set-up in the gym is inviting and allows us to assess gross motor abilities and confidence.
-Skills: Risk taking, climbing, coordination, upper body strength, depth perception, balance, jumping and landing. On the playground there are opportunities for digging, hauling, pedaling, running.

Special Interest
-Large group meeting: Music and rhythmic movement will be used to help the children learn each other's names and the classroom routines. The large group meeting also emphasizes togetherness and fosters the building of classroom community.

Snack
Monday - No School
Wednesday- Rice cakes
Thursday - Rice cakes

FALL SESSION Lesson Plan 9-27-2013

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Weekly Lesson Plan for Ross' Class
September 17-27, 2013
Lead Teaching These Weeks: Ross

Overview: And so begins another year at the Lab School! As you will notice the room is filled (or rather, not so filled), with many familiar materials. At the beginning of the school year, I feel it's extremely important that the children feel comfortable with coming to school. Even the "veterans" of the Lab School sometimes need some adjustment time to get back into the routines of coming to school every day. That is why we start the year with many familiar materials. Also, I feel it is vital that the children begin connecting with one another rather than the materials in the room. A key element to supporting the learning in early childhood revolves around the social relationships of the child, and that is why building relationships is a primary focus of the fall session. Our goals for the first few weeks are to help your child be excited about coming to school, feel like the Lab School is a safe and fun place to be while they are here, and get to know their peers (hopefully establishing new and/or reigniting old friendships). Our overarching question for the year is "Who am I?" and you will see this theme represented in many areas of the classroom.

Expressive Arts (paint, collage, clay)
• Materials: easel - primary colored paints; art table - primary colored water, pipettes, clear mixing trays, various natural and "beautiful" materials for collage (e.g. wood shavings, pinecones, seed pods, leaves, etc.), markers, crayons; clay table - clay, supportive tools (rolling pins, mallets, and wood knives)
• Rationale: To foster creativity and artistic expression, we will have a variety of familiar/intriguing materials. We also plan to create opportunities for children to work together/observe the work of their peers by inviting groups of children to work together at the art table; initiating/fostering social relationships.
• Skills: color recognition, creativity, fine-motor strength/coordination, artistic expression, symbolic representation, social skills

Sensory (water table)
• Materials: pitchers, small/large bottles and containers
• Rationale: Exploring the physical properties of water is extremely engaging for children. It also allows for many opportunities for children to play together: working cooperatively to fill containers, excitedly pouring the contents out, as well as creating opportunities for the start of various dramatic play storylines.
• Skills: large-/fine-motor strength, eye-to-hand coordination, math conceptions related to counting/measurement/comparing-contrasting, fostering new/existing social relationships

Science
• Materials: picture board with our class pictures, large mirrors, black markers, paper, computer (with "Our class pictures" slideshow scrolling across the screen
• Rationale: To begin answering our "Who am I?" question, we want to help build the children's awareness of themselves, as well as their fellow classmates. Here, the children will get to find their picture as well as begin to identify the pictures of their peers. The drawing supplies and mirrors are they to elicit the children observations of themselves in "real time:" watching their own movements and expressions while having the possibility to start drawing what they observe. Eventually, we plan to broaden the questions from "Who am I?" to "Who are we?"
• Skills: scientific awareness building and investigation skills, observation skills, strengthening home-to-school connection, foster sense of school/classroom community, foster growing sense of self/autonomy

Dramatic Play (including the "Nook" and the cave)
• Materials: "house" furniture (e.g. stove, fridge, sink, and cupboard), plates, pretend food, shoes, fabric, stuffed animals, baby-dolls and care supplies (these are in the Nook), stuffed animals and habitat materials
• Rationale: Playing house is one of the most common themes for young children to play, as it is what they know the best! This will help support the children's growing comfort with coming to school as well as with each other as they can play with familiar props and storylines. The stuffed animals in the cave offer a similar opportunity for representational story play: using the animals as a means to express/tell their stories.
• Skills: imaginative/creative play, symbolic representation, fostering social relationships

Math and Manipulatives
• Materials: various seriated pegboards, nesting cups, puzzles, connectors
• Rationale: These open-ended materials allow the children to sort, order, and arrange the materials in various ways while allowing the teachers to ask specific content questions that help us learn more about what your child knows. They also create great opportunities for children to work together, which has been proven to show strong learning potential when children work in groups.
• Skills: color recognition, seriation (i.e. stacking highest to lowest), patterning, counting, one-to-one correspondence, sorting, opportunities for collaborative problem solving

Language and Literacy
• Materials: pencils, markers, paper, envelopes, staplers, tape
• Rationale: Many children have already shown an interest in writing during the home-visits, and we feel it is imperative to support the pre-/early-literacy skills involved with writing. We also want to begin the year off with opportunities to tell and create stories with the children, and the writing center will (hopefully) become a hub for creation of stories (from both the teachers and the children!).
• Skills: pre-/early-literacy skills, letter recognition, introduction to storytelling, fine-motor coordination/endurance (as children hand muscles grow stronger with holding writing utensils)

Blocks
• Materials: large hollow blocks, multi-shaped unit blocks, peg people, wooden dollhouse, translucent color blocks
• Rationale: Blocks (large and small) offer amazing opportunities for children to create and represent the world as well as how they make sense of it! The vast building potential allows for children to symbolically represent almost anything: planes, trucks, homes, planets, and even math problems! Blocks are also a seminal component to building/supporting social relationships between the children. The addition of the peg-people (wood dowels with a picture of each child/teacher on them) will help create great opportunities for the children to comfortably play/form relationships with one another - using the peg people initiate interactions.
• Skills: large-/fine-motor skills, symbolic representation, concepts of balance, counting, comparing/contrasting skills, social relationships, opportunities for endless dramatic play

Large Motor
• Materials: in the GYM: A-frame, slide, jumping station with padded donut landing zone, climbing wall, monkey bars, trampoline
on the PLAYGROUND: climber, slides, swings, and lush grasses and tress provided by Mother Nature
• Rationale: The gym is another great venue to help the children get to know one another by observing peers try the various equipment, participating in group activities, taking turns, and often finding someone who enjoys the same activities. The gym also lends itself to be a space for fun teacher-facilitated activities! To begin the year, we will play a few games during the week that will help the children meet one another. On the playground we will keep the buckets, shovels, and tricycles in the shed for the first few days, letting the children explore playground and discover all the amazing things it has to offer!
• Skills: large-motor strength/coordination/endurance, eye-to-hand and eye-to-foot coordination, body in motion (i.e. jumping and sliding), cardiovascular strength, depth perception, turn taking, social

Special Interest (large group, music, cooking, fire drill, etc)
ENROLLMENT FORMS - if you still have any forms to turn in, please bring them with you on your child's first day.
• Just a reminder, there will be no curbside drop-off on Tuesday or Wednesday.
• With the cooler temps seemingly on their way, be sure to send the appropriate clothes with your child. Our room does stay warm, so having your children wear a few layers may help them stay comfortable as they travel from inside and out.

Snack (As we are still waiting for the last of the allergy information to come in this week, snack will remain quite simple...it will change for next week.)
Monday - No School
Tuesday - Rice cakes
Wednesday - Rice cakes
Thursday - Pretzels
Friday- Graham crackers & raisins
*All snacks served with milk/water unless otherwise noted*

Daily Schedule for Ross' Class

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Typical Daily Schedule

7.30-8.30 Teachers arrive, set up the environment, and discuss the day

8.30-9.00 Arrival/Exploration Time/Gym: teachers walk children into the building, and help them start the day. Children choose an activity in the front of the room: art, puzzles, manipulatives, sensory table, playdough, computer, science exploration, writing center, or "the caves"

9.00-9.15 Large Group: children come together to share music, stories, as well as new information pertaining to classroom interests, events, or projects

9.15-10.15 Focus Groups/Free-play: children will join a teacher-facilitated group with their peers and participate in an activity relevant to the topics being explored in the room; afterwards they may finish an activity they started during arrival/exploration time or choose from additional activities throughout the room

10.15-10.25 Clean-up and hand-washing

10.25-10.45 Whole-group snack: a daily community-building experience that allows teachers and children to connect with one another; reflecting on the day, as well as sharing information/stories to help strength social relationships

10.45-11.15 Toileting, getting ready to go outside, and playing on the playground

11.15-11.30 Pick-up/end of the day story reading

11.30-12.30 Teachers clean-up the room and discuss the day


Small group days - Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
(Groups typically start during wk 4 or 5 of each session and end wk 9)

8.30-9.05 Arrival/Exploration Time/Choice Gym

9.05-9.20 Large Group

9.20-9.40 Small Groups: similar to "Focus Groups" from above, however these group members remain the same for their continued meetings; following the collective interest of the group (as well as facilitation from the teacher) to help guide the learning and discovery (actual times will varie group-to-group)

9.40-10.35 Focus Groups and Free-play / Open snack

10.35-10.45 Clean-up

10.45-11.15 Toileting, getting ready to go outside, and playing on the playground

11.15-11.30 Pick-up/end of the day story reading

Lesson Plan-Ayuko's 3AM Classroom
Weeks of 9/16 and 9/23
Ayuko Lead Teaching

Overview: The first couple of weeks will be focused on supporting the children's adjustment to the school environment, creating a positive and comfortable space where they feel safe to say goodbye to their families. As the children explore and investigate the classroom, we hope they begin to think positively of the teachers and school. Slowly we will begin to learn the routines of the classroom and give the children the support they need to make transitions throughout the morning. The materials and play areas are arranged to promote these goals, create familiarity, and encourage the development of positive relationships with classmates and teachers.


Expressive Arts
• Materials: Wooden paint brushes, paper, and primary color paints
Rationale: To explore brush strokes and color mixing.
Skills: Fine motor control, observation, and hand-eye coordination.
• Materials: Paper, markers, crayons, stickers, and scissors.
Rationale: To explore the properties of a variety of art materials.
Skills: Fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.
• Materials: Playdough and a variety of molding tools.
Rationale: To produce an outlet for creative expression and promote social interaction.
Skills: Fine motor development (squeezing, poking, and pinching), observation, generating ideas, and sensory input.


Sensory
• Materials: Water, measuring cups, funnels, large and small jars.
Rationale: To encourage a practice of pouring and filling and develop the concept of empty and full, less and more, and in and out. To encourage social awareness as children notice what those across from them are doing with the same materials
Skills: Observation, math skills (volume and spatial relations), comparison, prediction, and fine motor.
• Materials: Noise sticks and water/glitter sticks.
Rationale: To promote experimentation with sound and how to produce sound. To challenge children's thinking while creating a satisfying cause and effect game with teachers and peers.
Skills: Physical coordination, observation, and sensory input.


Science
• Materials: Our Turtles, Tuck and Rainbow.
Rationale: To observe the turtles in the terrarium. To begin discussing the idea of caring for these pets as a class: What care does it entail?
Skills: Observation, prediction, comparison, classification.
• Materials: Fall harvesting materials such as gourds and pumpkins brought from home and magnifying glasses.
Rationale: To observe and feel the texture of gourds and pumpkins. To encourage children to share, feel, observe, and compare and become aware of the similarities and differences of the objects. To begin creating a home-school connection.
Skills: Observation, exploration, record, try out, and comparison, classification, communication


Dramatic Play
• Materials: Familiar household kitchen items, baby items, multiethnic babies, various dress-up clothes, scarves, pillows, and trucks and cars.
Rationale: To support pretend play, symbolic play, foster social interaction and cooperative play. To promote social interaction, peek-a-boo games, and provide a room/cozy area to read and relax.
Skills: Communication, cooperation, turn taking, role play, symbolic representation, and social skills.
• Materials: Stuffed household pets: dogs and turtles.
Rationale: To stimulate pretend play with familiar animals they know or have at home. To promote social interaction among the children and teachers.
Skills: Social skills, cooperation, communication, turn taking, and role play.


Math and Manipulatives
• Materials: shape sorters, seriation and color stackers, and puzzles.
Rationale: To promote fine motor development, shape and color differentiation, and hand-eye coordination for spatial awareness.
Skills: visual discrimination, turn taking, fine motor control.


Language and Literacy
• Materials: Signs, questions, and related books posted in various curriculum areas and a variety of books on the book shelf.
Rationale: To support their development in language and literacy and emergent reading, such as the process of independently turning pages in a book and dictating a story from the pictures.
Skills: Listening, speaking, phonological awareness, vocabulary expansion.


Blocks
• Materials: Hollow, foam, and cardboard blocks.
Rationale: To support mathematical skills, social interaction, and collaborative building. To be incorporated into buildings or roads for the vehicles located nearby.
Skills: Communication, collaboration, large motor, expressive creation, mathematical and scientific concepts.


Large Motor
• Materials: Indoors - Climbing equipments, stairs, slide, and trampoline. Outside - Gardening bed with fruit and vegetables, natural materials such as tall grass, stumps, plants, and trees, wooden house, picnic table, slide, and tools for digging and molding sand.
Rationale: To support basic skills such as jumping, climbing, balance, coordination, and upper and lower body development and promote social interaction and role play.
Skills: Perceptual Motor Skills (spatial, temporal, directional, and body awareness) and physical fitness (cardio vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and agility).


Large group
• Materials: name songs, books, fingerplay.
Rationale: To begin a routine, familiarize the children with each other's names, and promote a beginning sense of group, community, and collaboration.
Skills: fine motor development, hand eye coordination, listening, speaking, patience, taking turns, communication, and social skills.


Music - Music will be apparent throughout the day to support transitions and encourage participation.
• Materials: Piano
Rationale: to promote exploration of sound, volume, rhythm and social interaction.
Skills: turn taking, fine motor development, and mathematical concepts such as beats and patterns.


Snacks:
Wednesday 9/18 and Thursday 9/19 - apple slices and whole wheat crackers.
Monday 9/23, Wednesday 9/25 Thursday, 9/26: TBD

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