April 2011 Archives

Please join as at the Political Theory Colloquium this Friday (4/29),
for a talk by Banu Bargu (Assistant Professor of Political Science,
New School), followed by a discussion. Professor Bargu will present
her work "From the Margins: Materialism of the Encounter and Political
Spectacle."

Abstract
In a piece that dates back to 1962, Althusser discusses El Nost Milan,
a play by Bertolazzi staged by the Piccolo Teatro of Milan under the
direction of Strehler. His discussion of theater, curiously anchored
among the theoretical essays that comprise the groundbreaking
collection For Marx, remains relatively tangential to his overall
philosophical project. However, the analysis of the structure of the
Bertolazzi play contains important indications for the extremely
interesting theory of aleatory materialism Althusser develops in the
1980s. In this paper, I read Althusser's "Piccolo Teatro" as an essay
in which his analysis of a theatrical performance anticipates elements
that make up his aleatory materialism, focusing particularly on the
concept of the encounter. I trace the implications of Althusser's
analysis of El Nost Milan for Althusser's oeuvre and, in the spirit of
an aleatory materialist analysis, to extend this analysis toward the
understanding of our contemporary political conjuncture marked by
spectacular political acts (such as self-immolations in North Africa
and the Middle East). Althusser's "Piccolo Teatro" presents us with a
rich resource for political thinking, not only for understanding
political conjunctures marked by evental ruptures but also for carving
a role for critique in these conjunctures.

As usual, the colloquium will be at 1:30 in 1314 Social Sciences;
coffee will be served.

Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy


Professor Mani Subramani
Carlson School of Management

will speak on:

Changing Motives for Global Sourcing: From Labor Arbitrage to Innovation

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 26
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

One of the key drivers for global sourcing has been the ability to leverage the lower costs - typically lower labor costs - overseas. While increased competitiveness through the lowering of costs continues to be an important goal, it is increasingly becoming evident that overseas suppliers and a firm's overseas operations can also contribute to firm competitiveness by enhancing the level of innovation in new product development and in business process execution. There are a number of firms on the leading edge of this movement such as GE, Boeing, and PepsiCo and their initial successes offer a variety of
lessons for both large and medium sized firms to take advantage of these
new opportunities created by the global diffusion of capabilities.

Professor Subramani is a faculty member in the Carlson School and teaches an MBA course titled "Managing Globally" that incorporates a field trip to India with the students. He will draw on his experience of the changes he and the students have witnessed in over the past seven years to share his views on how global sourcing can be an important driver of a firm's innovation.


All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Verdad, Justicia, y Reparación
Truth, Justice, and Reparation


A talk by Spanish Investigating Judge Baltasar Garzón

Monday, April 25
2:00pm
25 Mondale Hall
University of Minnesota, West Bank

Judge Baltasar Garzón served for many years on Spain's central criminal court, the Audiencia Nacional, which has jurisdiction over the most important criminal cases in Spain, including terrorism, organized crime and money laundering, as well as universal jurisdiction for violations of international law. He first came to international attention in 1998 when he sought the extradition of former Chilean president, General Augusto Pinochet, from England to Spain for the alleged deaths and torture of Spanish citizens by his regime.

In 2008, Garzón initiated an investigation into the crimes committed by the Franco regime in Spain. He has since been temporarily suspended from his position in the Audiencia Nacional, awaiting trial on accusations from right-wing groups of having exceeded his authority. Since May 2010, he has been working in the International Criminal Court in The Hague, and he will shortly begin working as an advisor to the Organization of American States mission to Colombia.

Lecture in Spanish with simultaneous translation provided - reception to follow

Talk organized by the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese Studies and Political Science.
Co-sponsors include: European Studies Consortium, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Institute for Global Studies, Human Rights Program, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change, Law School, Global Spotlight

The Black Atlantic: Colonial and Contemporary Exchanges

Stanford University, California
October 28-29, 2011
DEADLINE: June 1, 2011

The Stanford Forum for African Studies (SFAS) invites proposals for papers by graduate
students, scholars, and faculty on the topics of slavery, migration and the African Diaspora, and how each of these affect social, economic, and political development in Africa in the past and present.

Interested participants should submit abstracts by email to stanfordfas@gmail.com.
Please also include your name, affiliation and contact details.

This interdisciplinary conference aims to examine the vestiges of the slave trade, and economic and cultural exchanges more broadly, both within and from Africa. Scholars and activists have traditionally addressed matters relating to economic inequality, hierarchical racial segregation and ideology, the transfer of cultural realities presented in art, music, and rituals. The symposium seeks, therefore, to shed light on the effect of forced and voluntary migration on identity and culture, and on social, economic, and political development in Africa and in the African Diaspora. We are soliciting proposals that combine insights, methods, and research from both the social sciences and the humanities, including the fields of anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature, political science, and psychology among others.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

· Identity formation in the Diaspora
· The spread and influence of African culture, art, and music
· The role of technology in connecting migrants to their home countries
· Regional integration and the economic effects of migration within Africa
· Brain drain out of Africa
· Migration and its relation to political and economic development in Africa
· The role of remittances in modern day Africa
· The slave trade present in literature and/or music in the Americas

Please contact Melina Platas at mplatas@stanford.edu with any further questions.

International Development Student Group

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

If you're interested in being more involved with IPID next school year, consider running for office! IPID will elect new executive officers (president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, and at-large member) April 28, 2011.

Committee chair elections (for the programming, finances, outreach, framing and documentation, and IT committees) will take place in the fall to ensure that incoming students have opportunities for leadership and involvement.

The goal of IPID is to enrich the University of Minnesota with broad interdisciplinary activities related to international development while providing graduate students with opportunities to develop skills in leadership and scholarly activities.

Nominations will be accepted until Sunday midnight April 24!

Elections Quick Facts:
-Voting will begin at noon, April 25 and end at noon, April 29
-Results of the elections will be announced via the IPID listserv on the afternoon of April 29

To Self-Nominate Yourself As A Candidate
-Send your self-nomination to ipid@umn.edu to be posted on the IPID web site
-Nomination materials include:

* Your name, academic program and year
* The office for which candidacy is sought
* One paragraph describing your interest and experience in international development, your goals for IPID, and briefly answer one of the following framing IPID questions:
o How does an interdisciplinary perspective shift our conceptualization of international development?
o What are the trends and issues affecting current approaches to international development?
o What is the future of this interdisciplinary field (including the role of the international community)?

Officer Responsibilities

-Must be a registered U of M student
-Must commit to the mission of IPID
-Must be able to commit for 1 year
-Must be able to commit 1.5-2.5 hrs per week

More information about the executive officer roles and responsibilities may be found on the IPID web site:

*IBID Student Speaker Conference*

Power, Participation, and Development: Who's In Control?

THIS Friday, April 22nd 2011 2:30-6:30pm Wilkins Room (215) at the Humphrey School (West Bank)

Agenda:
2:30 - 2:35 Brief Introduction of IPID
2:40 - 3:05 Speaker 1: Devin Hogan "Know Book": Power and Participation of the Liberian Diaspora in Institutional Capacity Building.
3:10 - 3:35 Speaker 2: Zachary Casey - Teacher Bashing and Power in Educational Policy: The Increasing Voicelessness of P-12 Educators in the United States.
3:40 - 4:05 Speaker 3: Patrick Finnegan - Rethinking Development Policy in Ethiopia: What should NG NGO's Do?
4:05 - 4:20 Break
4:20 - 4:45 Speaker 4: Heidi Eschenbacher - Welcome to our world: Reflections on collaborative work in Southern Sudan.
4:55 - 5:15 Speaker 5: Mike Osberg & Lindsey Wollschlager - Working Across Networks: Co-creating Knowledge with the Waste Analysis Matrix (Humphrey Capstone group)
5:15 - 6:30 Dinner and Moderated Panel with all student speakers.

Moderator: Brandon Wu
Dinner Provided

IPID = Interdiciplianry Perspectives on International Development


Workshop on Global Policy

Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Professor Mani Subramani

Carlson School of Management

will speak on:

Changing Motives for Global Sourcing: From Labor Arbitrage to Innovation

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 26
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus


One of the key drivers for global sourcing has been the ability to leverage the lower costs - typically lower labor costs - overseas. While increased competitiveness through the lowering of costs continues to be an important goal, it is increasingly becoming evident that overseas suppliers and a firm's overseas operations can also contribute to firm competitiveness by enhancing the level of innovation in new product development and in business process execution. There are a number of firms on the leading edge of this movement such as GE, Boeing, and PepsiCo and their initial successes offer a variety of
lessons for both large and medium sized firms to take advantage of these
new opportunities created by the global diffusion of capabilities.

Professor Subramani is a faculty member in the Carlson School and teaches an MBA course titled "Managing Globally" that incorporates a field trip to India with the students. He will draw on his experience of the changes he and the students have witnessed in over the past seven years to share his views on how global sourcing can be an important driver of a firm's innovation.


All are welcome! Refreshments will be served


April 27th, 2:30 PM, 614 Social Science Building

Presented by Dr. Guillaume De Rouge, a research fellow from the Institute de Rechererche Strategique de L'Ecole Militaire (IRSEM) in France

EUROPE IN THE NEWS (April 27 Libya).pdf

Reading Chicano Like a Queer by Sandra Soho

"Reading Chican@ Like a Queer"
Friday, April 22, Noon, Walter Library 405

Literary and cultural studies scholars have long approached Chican@ texts through two overlapping presuppositions: they offer instructive reflections of the material social processes that racialize and oppress peoples of Mexican descent living in the US; and, they help constitute and mobilize an oppositional Chican@ public for politically contesting racism in the US. What happens when we ease these burdens of transparent reflection and of an identity politics squarely focused on race? When reflection is shattered? When Chican@ representations thwart our desires for mastery (of knowledge, of agency)? When what they offer up instead is the unknowable, unthinkable, unsayable? In "Reading Chican@ Like a Queer" Sandra K. Soto revisits key texts with these questions in mind.

What's Wrong with Arizona by Sandra Soto

What's Wrong with Arizona?
Thursday, April 21, 6:00PM-8:00PM
Nolte Hall 125

"Arizona is ground zero... the front line in the struggle for justice."
--Cornel West


In "What's Wrong with Arizona," Sandra K Soto describes and analyzes what her colleague K. Tsianina Lomawaima has aptly coined Arizona's "regressive suite of legislation." Seeking to further marginalize the growing Latino community in the state (especially the foreign born), these laws and bills curtail mobility, solidarity, education, and even Constitutional rights:
SB 1070 (the "show-me-your-papers-law")
HB 2281 (the "anti-ethnic studies law)
HB 2561 (the "anchor-baby law" repealing rights accorded by the 14th Amendment)

Soto provides close, analytic readings of these laws in accessible language. She also links them and their authors/sponsors together to show how the promotion of one buttresses the other. She also will talk about the usefulness of queer theory and queer politics not only for reading the norms produced by--and productive of--the legislation, but for questioning some of the "family-values" based activist responses to the legislation.


In the second half of the talk, Soto discusses the vibrant activist defense of Ethnic Studies and of (im)migrants' rights both within and beyond Tucson, focusing especially on Chican@ youth.

The Art of Honoring Leadership Development Mentoring Program is designed for first generation female, junior and senior or graduate students of color.

It is an 8-month program, meeting once a month from 9am-12:30pm, and the kick-off is October 6, 2011. The mentors are leaders within top corporations (3M Company, Wells Fargo, Boston Scientific, HealthPartners, Target) and the mentees are chosen from year Universities (U of M, Carlson School of Management, St. Catherine University, Bethel University, Hamline University, Metropolitan State University and Augsburg College) based on a specific criteria (see www.honoringwomenworldwide.org/content/view/54/83/ for more information). Many students participating in the program have gotten jobs and internships as well as mentors have gotten promotions.

We have received amazing results in the last two years. Students will grow their professional networks and build relationships with managers and recruiters at Fortune 500 companies.
The mentoring organizations contribute funding for each mentor and the colleges also contribute a small amount for each mentee, which covers materials, room rentals, refreshments and facilitators' fees.

If you are interested, please send a letter expressing your interest and background by Friday, April 22 to the Women's Center at the University of Minnesota at women@umn.edu.

----- For faculty, staff and administrators, if you would like to sponsor a student or students in your unit or department for this program, please contact Nancy Stephan at: 651-730-0900 or nancy@honoringwomenworldwide.org.
Ricardo Dominguez
Associate Professor of Visual Arts
University of California, San Diego

April 26, 2011
4 - 5:15pm Social Sciences Building room 1114

Dominguez is an artist, scholar, and co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group that developed Virtual-Sit-In technologies in 1998 in solidarity with the Zapatista communities in Chiapas, Mexico. The EDT recently developed the Transborder Immigrant Tool--a GPS cell phone safety net tool for migrants crossing the Mexico/U.S border and has achieved international recognition for this project. Dominguez is also co-Director of Thing (thing.net), an ISP for artists and activists. Dominguez's tenure is under fire as a result of his successful coordination of a virtual sit-in at the University of California Office of the President alongside student protests, concerning statewide budget cuts and racially-motivated hate crimes on the UCSD campus. Event Sponsors: U of M Department of Sociology, the Institute for Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy (IDEA), Scholars for Academic Justice
The last of the semester's Gender/Asia Seminar Series presentations, by Satish Poduval, will take place this Wednesday, April 20th. We hope that many of you will be able to attend. Thank you for helping to make this new series a success during its first semester, and best wishes for a smooth end to all of your spring terms, too.

Wednesday, April 20th:

"The Remaking of Gender and Class in Post-1970s Indian Cinema"

Satish Poduval (English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad) Respondent: Christine Marran (UMN - Asian Languages & Literatures)

3:30 - 5:00 P.M. 710 Social Science

A significant counter-point to the staging of subaltern impatience and revolt that characterized popular Hindi cinema of the 1970s was the staging of middle-class desire and domesticity, away from the generic conventions of the "Social." Satish Poduval argues that during the 1970s this "desire for modernity" was often supplemented with a determination to secure it, and this necessarily involved newer forms of engagement and disengagement with the symbolic pact that had instituted modernity in India during the Nehruvian conjuncture. The emergence of a new and popular cycle of domestic comedies/melodramas is traced by focusing on selected films of Hrishikesh Mukherjee (Abhimaan and Namak Haraam) and Basu Chatterji (Rajnigandha and Chhoti si Baat), which might be seen as putting into play a newer narrative contract that later enabled (through tele-serials made by these influential directors during the 1980s) the desiring/consuming screen subjects of the post-liberalization Hindi film narratives.

Satish Poduval is Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Studies, at the English and Foreign Languages University (Hyderabad). He has contributed to the Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinema (1998), edited Re-Figuring Culture (2005), and is completing a monograph on the new political documentary film in India.

Social Justice and the Quality of Education in Africa

Professor Leon Tikly.pdf

Director of the EdQual Research Programme and Director of Research in the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol


Thursday, April 28, 2011, 4 pm

Coffman Union 325

This talk will provide a critique of dominant human capital and rights-based approaches for researching the quality of education in low income countries. An alternative, context-led framework based on social justice principles will be explained in relation to three intersecting contexts, namely policy, school, and home/community.


Questions and RSVPs can be directed to Aryn Baxter, baxte085@umn.edu.

Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Development student group and Department of Organizational Leadership, Development, and Policy

Water for Peace Panel Discussion:

Water Conflict in Iraq and the Middle East


When: Wednesday, April 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Where: Room 101, Walter Library, University of Minnesota (Map)

_______________________________

Water Conflict in Iraq and the Middle East will bring expert panelists together to discuss water rights, access to clean water, and regional conflict around water issues in Iraq and the Middle East.

The panel is part of the Earth Day Network's Global Day of Conversation and is co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota graduate school student group, Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Development.

Panelists will include:

Basil Mahayni: Water Crises and Political Conflict: Local and Transnational Waters in Perspective

Marc Dettman: Climate Change and water resource resilience in the Middle East and North Africa

Barry Reisch: How a small group of dedicated people can make a difference: Veterans For Peace Iraq Water Project

_______________________________

According to the United Nations, at least six million people in Iraq
have no access to clean water

_______________________________

Dr. Mustafa Kibargolu of Bilkent University in Turkey cautions that, "unless some old water policies are purged and new ones introduced, it is a real possibility that this region will become a time bomb in terms of water rights."

For further information, please contact IARP. For more information about Water for Peace, visit http://reconciliationproject.org.

Culture Corps Presents: "Implications of China's Single Child Policy"

Culture Corps sponsors a global discussion group session about the implications of the 30 years old "Single Child Policy" in the People's Republic of China. How have demographic patterns changed? What are the perspectives of social conditions, coupling and migrations due to these changes in the demographic structure? Join Prof. Deborah Levison (Humphrey School of Public Affairs) and the co-speaker Lu Han, an international graduate student at the U of M to talk about this important global topic.

Date: Thursday, April 21, 2011

Time: 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.

Place: 614 Social Sciences Building, West Bank

Light refreshments will be served.

Migration Futures in a Warmer World


presented by
Richard Black
Professor of Human Geography, Head of School of Global Studies,
Sussex Centre for Migration Research, University of Sussex, UK

Thursday, April 14, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
120 Andersen Library

Bring a bag lunch, beverages will be provided. Free and open to students, faculty, and the public. Directions are available on the Web.

Global Race Ethnicity and Migration Series

Co-sponsored by Department of Geography,
Department of Sociology & Interdisciplinary Center
For the Study of Global Change

Please join us this Friday (4/15) for the political theory colloquium.
We will host Professor Paul Rahe (Hillsdale College) who will briefly
present his paper "Montesquieu's Natural Rights Constitutionalism,"
followed by a longer discussion. The colloquium will be in 1314
Social Sciences at 1:30; coffee will be served.

Professor Rahe's paper

Professor Rahe's visit is made possible by the Tocqueville Fund, a
small endowment administered by the board of the Minnesota Association of Scholars. MAS will also be hosting Professor Rahe for a talk on Thursday, April 14 at 7:30 at the Fort Snelling Officer's Club. To
sign up or ask questions contact Terry Flower at 651-690-6598 or
e-mail contact@intellectualtakeout.org.

Freeman Center for International Economic Policy,
Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs,
presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Neerada Jacob
Belfer Center, Kennedy School, Harvard University

will speak on:

Can Sanctions Prevent the Spread of Nuclear Weapons?

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 12
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Economic sanctions have long been derided as ineffective instruments of foreign policy. At the same time, however, they continue to remain a principal tool for preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons by nations. Drawing on the cases of Iraq and Libya, Ms. Jacob will show that sanctions tend to be more successful when they are one component of an overall coercive strategy. The talk will address factors affecting the impact of sanctions on nuclear programs. Research from the case studies of Taiwan and Iran will also be briefly discussed, ultimately laying out the complexities involved.


All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

final_logo_wdmk_box.jpg

ICGC Brown Bag

Presented by Virgil Slade PhD Candidate, History Department and Researcher and Narrative Designer, District Six Museum,
Cape Town, South Africa.

Offside: Kick Ignorance Out, Football Unites, Racism Divides

(Offside) was launched in June 2010 and is a joint project between the District Six Museum, the British Council, Football Unites, Racism Divides (FURD) and Kick Racism Out of Football (KIO). It is hosted at the District Six Museum's Homecoming Center in Cape Town, South Africa, and highlights the different forms of discrimination that are still resident in the 'beautiful game'. Football (soccer) exhibitions have, almost as a rule, taken on a very specific form both in the South African context and further abroad. Generally, sport displays have adopted the "Hall Of Fame" model that allows very little critical space. In contrast, the main aim of Offside is to provide a counter-narrative to the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (commonly known as FIFA) rhetoric as it constituted itself in the build up to the first ever football world cup hosted on African soil. This brownbag will focus on two aspects of the exhibition. Firstly, it will explore why this exhibition has made such an important contribution to public history. Secondly, this discussion will unpack the editorial decisions made by the exhibition team in creating its narrative through a very measured usage of text, audio-visuality, art and space.

Friday, April 15, 2011 · 12:00 p.m · 537 Heller

A lecture by Spanish Investigating Judge Baltasar Garzón

"Verdad, Justicia y Reparación" ("Truth, Justice and Reparation")

Lecture in Spanish with translation provided

Monday, April 25th
2:00pm
25 Mondale Hall (Law School)

Reception to follow lecture

Co-sponsors:
The Humphrey School of Public Affairs
The Institute for Global Studies
The Human Rights Program
The Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change
The European Studies Consortium
The Law School
The Global Spotlight within Global Programs and Strategy Alliance


What's Wrong With American Education - A Panel Discussion

On Wednesday, April 13th at 6:30 pm in the Rapson Hall Auditorium, Students For Education Reform-Minnesota will be hosting a panel discussion with some of the state's top K-12 education reformers.

Moderator: Daniel Sellers, Teach For America-Twin Cities Executive Director

Panelists:
Brenda Cassellius ,Minnesota Education Commissioner
Rob Clark , Sr. Director of State Government Affairs & MinnCAN Board Member Pat Garofalo ,Chairman of the Education Finance Committee Representative
Al Fan, Charter School Partners Executive Director
Terri Bonoff , Minnesota State Senator (District 43)


Light refreshments will be provided. More information can be viewed at http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=201445393221922


Hope to see you there!

Alternative Narratives or Denial? Wednesday, April 13 4:00 p.m. Humphrey Forum, Humphrey Center


Godard's Wars Philip Watts, Associate Professor of French, Department Chair, Columbia University


There has been much controversy about French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard's relation to the Jews and the Holocaust. Godard was recently accused of anti-Semitism. Philip Watts will return to this recent affair by focusing on Godard's filmic representation of WWII, the Middle East conflict and the Holocaust.

Thoughts on Giorgio Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive
Jeffrey Mehlman, Professor of French, Department of Romance Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston University

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben has argued in several books that the concentration camp has become the paradigm of our life in modern, liberal democracies. His work has a vast influence on many different fields and disciplines: legal scholarship, social sciences (especially political science), and literary studies in the US, Europe and beyond.

Jeffrey Mehlman will examine the perils engaged and not always avoided when Italy's pre-eminent philosopher, perched between Heidegger and Benjamin, Foucault and Arendt, hurls the pre-eminent discourses of European modernity at the pre-eminent catastrophe of the twentieth century in what never quite coheres as the pre-eminent epistemological encounter of modern times.

Event Flyer (PDF)

"Hate in the Past Tense: Understanding the Origins of Armenian Genocide Denial as a Problem of Contemporary Reconciliation"


Keith David Watenpaugh, Associate Professor and historian, University of California-Davis Thursday, April 14, 2011 4:00 p.m. Room 710 Social Science Building


Dr. Watenpaugh will explore how aspects of Armenian Genocide denial first emerged around a discrete historical moment, in particular international humanitarian relief efforts on behalf of Armenian Genocide survivors in the early interwar period. Thinking about denial in this fashion creates a space in which to reflect critically about how history as both a discipline and practice operates in the spheres of power and public opinion, especially across political and cultural divides.

Professor Watenpaugh will also present "Hate in the Past Tense" in an abbreviated format at 7:00 p.m. at the St. Sahag Armenian Church, 203 North Howell Street, St. Paul.

On Friday, April 15, Professor Watenpaugh will present his paper "Finding the Lost: The League of Nations' Rescue of Armenian Genocide Survivors and the Paradoxes of Modern Humanitarianism" at 3:30 p.m. in room 1210 Heller Hall.

Event Flyer (PDF)

Final Meeting of the CHGS Reading Discussion Group


The final meeting of the 2011 CHGS Reading Discussion Group will be on Thursday, April 14. The group will meet at 12pm in room 201A in Wilson Library. The discussion will be led by Dr. Keith David Watenpaugh, historian and Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights and Peace who teaches in the Religious Studies program at UC-Davis.



We will be discussing chapters 10, 11 and 12 of Remembrance and Denial: The Case of the Armenian Genocide, edited by Richard G. Hovannisian. The excerpts are available on-line on the CHGS Reading Discussion blog.


Space is limited, and reservations are required. If you are interested in attending, please send an email to chgs@umn.edu with your name, email address and phone number (please put RDG in the subject line), or call 612-624-0256.

Event Flyer (PDF)

Gender/Asia Seminar Series & Sociology Workshop Series
present

Professor Raka Ray University of CA-Berkeley

*Professor Lisa Park, respondent

This talk examines the ways in which the servant-employing middle and upper classes in Kolkata produce and reproduce class at home through the maintenance and cultivation of distinction. The operations of distinction make natural and normal the relationship of exploitation which undergirds the institution of domestic servitude in India and elsewhere. In Kolkata's culture of servitude, distinction can take myriad forms, but the trope of distance between employers and servants - be it physical/spatial or metaphorical/emotional - is critical. In the spatiality of the old order - the big house with servants' quarters - servants are said to be everywhere and nowhere, and their presence unobtrusive. In the relatively curtailed space of the flat, servants are considered to be underfoot and infringing on privacy. Employers try to maintain distinction from servants by segregating the servant body through the politics and practices of eating, sitting, sleeping, bathing, and clothing. Employer anxieties and servant aspirations come to the fore as distinctions begin to blur with emerging discourses of democracy and rights in the home and the city.


Wednesday, April 13
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
710 Social Sciences


Sponsors: Institute for Global Studies, Dept. of Sociology & Institute for Advanced Studies

Coffee Hour 8 April with Abdi Samatar

GEOGRAPHY COFFEE HOUR FRI. 8 APRIL 2011:
Blegen 445, Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm

'The Politics of Piracy in Somalia: The Rich versus the Poor' - Abdi I. Samatar

[Professor and Chair of Geography, The University of Minnesota]Samatar coffee hour poster 4.8.11.pdf

Women's Center E-News, April 7, 2011

Greetings!

April is Sexual Assault Awareness month. The Women's Center is proud to be a co-sponsor of the Aurora Center's programming that aims to increase awareness of sexual assault on campus and support survivors. Please show your support by attending a variety of the free activities. For more information, please visit: http://www1.umn.edu/aurora/events/index.html


On Our Minds

All campus community members are invited to the grand opening of a new lactation room in Appleby Hall, Rm 220, on April 21 at 12:30! This much-needed resource for staff and student mothers is the result of the joint efforts and funding from the Student Parent HELP Center, the Women's Center and the Office for Student Affairs. Thanks to the Office for Equity and Diversity for an additional contribution. Research shows that workplace lactation spaces positively influence the health of the mother and the child , and are a cost-saving measure for employers by: reducing health insurance premiums and health care costs; decrease absenteeism; increasing job satisfaction, productivity, and employee retention (http://www.breastfeedingworks.org/econ.htm). We can assume this is also true in terms of the positive impact on student attendance and academic performance.

The Appleby Lactation Room is available on a first come, first served basis. Contact the SPHC at 6-6015 or the Center at 5-9837 for a key, and/or to join the Lactation Committee which supports women who elect to breastfeed. For more information: http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/worklife/lactation.

See you there,

Susan Warfield, SPHC Program Director


Women's Center Awards & Scholarships

*The Carol E. Macpherson Memorial Scholarship:* A private family scholarship that was established in the 1970's in Carol's memory to assist "non-traditional" women in completing their education at the University. The scholarship deadline is 4:30 PM, Wednesday, April 27th, 2011. Please visit: http://www1.umn.edu/women/awardsMacpherson.html for more information and to obtain an application.

Upcoming IHRC events

The exhibition "A Heart Connects Us" will close on Friday, April 8. Make sure to view the gallery before then!

Thursday, April 14, 12-1:30 p.m., 120 Andersen Library. Global REM Seminar will feature Richard Black presenting "Migration Futures in a Warmer World." Beverages will be served.

Tuesday, April 26, 4-5:30 p.m., 120 Andersen Library. Global REM Seminar will feature IHRC Showcase on Undergraduate Research. Presenters will be: the Collective SHEEKO Project, Mia Overly, Keit Osadchuk & John Ziegler. Graduate student commentators: Virgil Slade, Arta Ankrava & Ilze Garoza.

Thursday, April 28, 12-1:30 p.m., 308 Andersen Library. Global REM Seminar will feature Michele DeGregorio presenting "Arditi Rossi, Legionaries and Blackshirts in USA, 1921-1927." Beverages will be served.

Friday, April 29, 4-5:30 p.m., 135 Nicholson Hall. Lily Cho will present "Diasporic Counterpublics: Institutions and Installations." Sponsored by Asian American Studies, co-sponsored by Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature and the Immigration History Research Center.

Center for the Study of Politics and Governance

EVENT RESCHEDULED

The House will be in session during today's scheduled event time, so we are rescheduling the event to accommodate Speaker Zellers' schedule. The new day and time will be next Monday, April 11th, 2011 from 12:30-1:45 p.m.


Before the Negotiations Begin: Minnesota's Budget Deficit and Possible Solutions

Monday, April 11th, 2011
12:30-1:45 p.m.
Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School
301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis

Minnesota has a projected $5 billion deficit over the next biennium. The House and Senate propose reduced spending without tax increases, while the governor's proposal includes a mixture of spending cuts and an additional tax increase on the state's highest earners.

Is there a common ground to be found between their two plans? Will tax increases drive Minnesotans and Minnesota jobs away? Will spending reductions have a disproportionate affect on lower and middle income individuals? Leaders of the state legislature and governor's cabinet will assess the budget decisions and consequences, in addition to giving us a snapshot of how this great difference in positions can be bridged.

Please join us for a lively conversation with the following panelists:

Amy Koch, Minnesota Senator Majority Leader
Kurt Zellers, Minnesota House of Representatives Speaker
Myron Frans, Commissioner, Department of Revenue
Jim Schowalter, Commissioner, Minnesota Management and Budget

The event will be moderated by Steve Sviggum, legislative fellow with the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

These events are free and open to the public. For more information or to request disability accommodations, please call 612-625-2530 or email cspg@umn.edu.

The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

Special advance reading by German novelist Eugen Ruge, winner of the 2009 Alfred Doeblin Prize, at the U of M. The reading will be in German and English. The novel tells the history of communism/ socialism as an East German family's history.

What: English/ German reading from In Zeiten des abnehmenden Lichts
Who: German author Eugen Ruge; translator Jerome Samuelson; and GSD host Matthias Rothe

When: Tuesday, April 12, 12:00-1:15 PM, 125 Nolte (Library)

refreshments will be served

Sponsors: CGES, GSD, the Dept. of English, and IAS

Details:
In 2008, playwright, screen writer, literary translator of Anton Chekhov, and former mathematician Eugen Ruge took a big gamble. He decided to try his hand at a novel to see if he could capture the truth of lived communism in the GDR. The story, he believed, needed the broadest of canvasses. It needed to connect the GDR to the Soviet Union and to other places in the world. It needed to show the range and contradictions of individuals' experiences. It needed to present readers with a mosaic of perspectives. He set to work.

In 2009, Ruge's debut novel won the biennial Alfred Doeblin Prize, one of Germany's most coveted literary awards. Guenter Grass, 1999 Nobel Laureate for Literature, had created the award to honor and support daring new manuscripts by accomplished German novelists. Stylistically, Ruge connects to the tradition of great narrative storytellers. His daring is about what he shows--four generations of a political East German family: a son who flees the Nazis for the Soviet Union, almost dies in one of Stalin's gulags, and returns to the GDR to work as a researcher in a state historical institute; parents who at war's end return from political exile in Mexico to help build socialist East Germany; a grandson who flees the GDR just as the Wall comes down; and a great-grandson for whom the first generation's political struggles are but the stuff of boring history lessons.

CGES invited Eugen Ruge to Minnesota for an advance reading and discussion of his In Zeiten des abnehmenden Lichts. The German publisher Rowohlt Verlag granted special permission for an English/German reading.The novel will be published in September and is billed as Rowohlt's top new book for the fall season.

Neighbors for Nations launch at City Hall


On April 13th, 2011 we are launching a groundbreaking partnership that leverages the potential of the local Somali Minnesotan community to enact change in Somalia and here at home. Mayor R.T. Rybak, United Way and the Internally Displaced Somalis Advisory Council will join us in forging this innovative initiative that is quickly gaining both local and global support.

I invite you to join me as a special guest for this exciting event that will draw community leaders from across the Twin Cities. The event will be held at Minneapolis City Hall on April 13th at 6pm. Somalia is in crisis right now and our own Somali neighbors have issues living here in the US, please turn out and learn how you can get involved. Thanks!

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MN Made: A Showcase of Minnesota's Creativity

Emerging Global Order colloquium

28-29 April 2011 at the University of Minnesota Practicing Science, Technology and Rhetoric: The North-South Divide in an Emerging Global Order

Colloquium on Technology, Culture, & Communication

Description. This colloquium will highlight work being done at the University of Minnesota exploring the interdependent and global nature of contemporary science and technology practices. Participants will explore how those who work within institutions of science and/or employ emerging technologies, like (but not limited to) new information and communication technologies (ICTS), frame political, economic, cultural, and environmental arguments about the impacts of their practices on "others". In particular, we will focus on how the diffusion of contemporary science and technology practices plays out in transnational projects that span the divide between countries in the global North and South.

See full description and call for participation

Thursday, April 28: Institute for Advanced Study Thursday at Four
presentation in Nolte 125
Friday, April 29: Interdisciplinary Center for Global Change sponsored
in Studio E Rarig Center

Please contact Bernadette Longo (blongo@umn.edu) for additional information.

See description of collection planned as a result of this April colloquium.

See Call for Papers relating to the colloquium for a special issue of Science, Technology & Human Values

Center for the Study of Politics and Governance

Getting Americans Back to Work: Why We Need to Do it and How We Can

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011
12-1:15 p.m.
Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School
301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis

Unemployment remains at an extremely high level and is projected to subside only slightly, to about 8%, by the end of 2012. This means that five years after the recession began we would still face unemployment higher than the worst month of the prior two recessions. Yet, both parties seem to want to look the other way, talking about competitiveness and scaling back government, neither of which will help much to fill the current 11.4 million job shortfall. Lawrence Mishel, president of Economic Policy Institute, will explain the path not being taken. The forum will be moderated by Chris Farrell, chief economics correspondent for Minnesota Public Radio.


Before the Negotiations Begin: Minnesota's Budget Deficit and Possible Solutions

Wednesday April 6th, 2011
12-1:15 p.m.
Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School
301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis

Minnesota has a projected $5 billion deficit over the next biennium. The House and Senate propose reduced spending without tax increases, while the governor's proposal includes a mixture of spending cuts and an additional tax increase on the state's highest earners.

Is there a common ground to be found between their two plans? Will tax increases drive Minnesotans and Minnesota jobs away? Will spending reductions have a disproportionate affect on lower and middle income individuals? Leaders of the state legislature and governor's cabinet will assess the budget decisions and consequences, in addition to giving us a snapshot of how this great difference in positions can be bridged.

Please join us for a lively conversation with the following panelists:

Amy Koch, Minnesota Senator Majority Leader
Kurt Zellers, Minnesota House of Representatives Speaker
Myron Frans, Commissioner, Department of Revenue
Jim Schowalter, Commissioner, Minnesota Management and Budget

The event will be moderated by Steve Sviggum, legislative fellow with the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

These events are free and open to the public. For more information or to request disability accommodations, please call 612-625-2530 or email cspg@umn.edu.

Just Revelations: The Rwandan Genocide on Stage Prof. Laura Edmondson Dartmouth College

Hope Azeda's Echoes of a Thousand Hills. Photo: Mariah Coley


Friday April 8th 4:30-6pm Barker 100 followed by reception


The representation of the 1994 Rwandan genocide is an act fraught with tension
given the charged politics of the Great Lakes region in East Africa. This
lecture focuses on the work of Hope Azeda, a leading figure in the Rwandan
theatre scene, and how she negotiates Rwandan and Western understandings of the
genocide in light of her transnational background as a Rwandan Tutsi who grew
up in neighboring Uganda. The talk places Wendy Brown's theory of "wounded
attachments" in dialogue with Michael Taussig's concept of the "public secret"
to theorize the tensions and silences that permeate her work.


Laura Edmondson is an Associate Professor of theatre studies at Dartmouth
College. Her publications on East African theatre and performance include
Performance and Politics in Tanzania: The Nation on Stage (Indiana UP, 2007).
She is currently working on a book on transnational narratives of violence in
Uganda, Rwanda, and the DRC.

The Freeman Center for International Economic Policy sponsors a Global Policy Seminar/Workshop series every other Tuesday from 12:45 to 2:00 pm. All sessions are held in the Stassen Room (Room 170) of the Humphrey Center. The remaining talks for the semester are: April 12 - Nareeda Jacob on Sanctions and Nuclear Weapons April 26- Mani Subramani on Global Outsourcing Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Neerada Jacob
Belfer Center, Kennedy School, Harvard University

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 12
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Economic sanctions have long been derided as ineffective instruments of foreign policy. At the same time, however, they continue to remain a principal tool for preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons by nations. Drawing on the cases of Iraq and Libya, Ms. Jacob will show that sanctions tend to be more successful when they are one component of an overall coercive strategy. The talk will address factors affecting the impact of sanctions on nuclear programs. Research from the case studies of Taiwan and Iran will also be briefly discussed, ultimately laying out the complexities involved.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served


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