September 2011 Archives

GEOGRAPHY COFFEE HOUR FRI. 30 SEPTEMBER 2011:
JSA Rm (Blegen 445), Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm

[Associate Professor in the School of Journalism & Mass Communication,
University of Minnesota]

What role can visual representations, and photography in particular,
play in research in the social sciences and humanities? Photography
has been used as an adjunct to research since its invention, and the
romantic nineteenth century view that the medium is a transparent
window on the world persists, even in the age of Photoshop. My aim is
not to suggest that the inherent manipulability of the medium makes it
suspect. What I will argue is that like any other communicative
medium, photography is governed by cultural codes and conventions, and
that any image a photographer produces is a statement, not a neutral
transcription of the world in front of the lens. What does that mean
with respect to the use of photography as a mode of investigation and
as a medium for communicating ideas? My talk will respond to this
question using two photographic projects as examples: On the Nest and
In the Kitchen. Each explores the relationships among domestic space,
social behavior and the transmission of culture from one generation to
the next. And each provides a starting point for discussion of how
photographic representation can best function as a vehicle for
discovery and communication.

http://www.donaschwartz.com/

Professor August Nimtz
Department of Political Science, University of Minnesota

"What is to be done? Lenin's Electoral Strategy--A New Appreciation for Our Times"

Friday 30 September at 1:30 p.m. in the
Lippincott Room, 1314 Social Sciences Building.

Abstract:
Though neglected and/or minimized in even sympathetic accounts of his life, "parliamentary work" was a major weapon in Lenin's revolutionary arsenal. From the Revolution of 1905 to the Guns of August in 1914, Lenin devoted, arguably, more time and effort--certainly pages--to "Duma work" than any other task. He argued and fought for a course of action that challenged the claim of anarchists and latter-day apologists for Social Democracy that participation in the electoral arena inevitably leads to opportunism. His perspective and actions stand squarely on the shoulders of Marx and Engels. According to Trotsky, Bolshevik success in 1917 was due in many ways to what Lenin had achieved through these efforts.

Please visit http://www.polisci.umn.edu/centers/theory/ for more
information on the 2011-2012 Colloquium's description, current
schedule, and reading/study groups.

Unpaid Caregiving in the Development Process

Professor Greta Friedemann-Sánchez

Humphrey School of Public Affairs

will speak on:

Unpaid Caregiving in the Development Process

12:45 - 2:0 pm
Tuesday, September 27

170 HHH - Stassen Room

Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Taking care of the family and raising children is the most tangible "output" of unpaid labor and care work by preparing present and future workers needed for economic growth and human development. Yet, traditional measures of development render invisible the production of services and goods that occurs within the context of unpaid labor and caregiving in large part because it is not monetized. Demographic and economic changes in developing nations have had an effect on the distribution of housework versus care work, with the former diminishing and the later increasing. As a result, more attention is being paid to caregiving. The two concepts however, continue to be treated in the development literature as if they were interchangeable. While the contributions that unpaid caregivers provide are beneficial to society, they can have negative consequences on the caregiver: they erode physical and mental health, inhibit educational and training opportunities, and contribute to gender inequality. Drawing on the existing evidence from developed and developing nations, the seminar will define caregiving more narrowly, present a framework for understanding its effects on caregivers, highlight gaps in knowledge for developing nations, and

present outstanding research questions and policy implications.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

University of Georgia - Assistant Professor

The Department of Sociology, University of Georgia, invites applications for an Assistant Professor in social psychology, to begin Fall 2012. Email cover letter, CV, research statement, statement of teaching experience and interests, samples of written work, and three letters of recommendation to: Natasha Brown, Attn: Recruitment Committee. Direct questions to Chair of the Recruitment Committee: Prof. Dawn Robinson.
Deadline: Wed. Oct. 20. Open until filled

University of Texas-El Paso - Two Assistant Professorships

University of Texas-El Paso - Two Assistant Professor

The Sociology and Anthropology Department, University of Texas-El Paso, invites applications for two Assistant Professors, to begin Fall 2012.ABDs will be considered but PhD required by Aug. 2012. Email cover letter; CV; three letters of recommendation; one sample of written work; and evidence of teaching proficiency.
1) Specializations: transnationalism, migration, labor, gender, community engagement and applied sociology. Email application to: Prof. Aurolyn Luykx, Search Committee Chair,
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas-El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968
2) Specializations: sociology of health, especially risks and risky behaviors, in conjunction with transnationalism, borders, and/or Latino/as. Email application to: Prof. Sara Grineski, Search Committee Chair, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968
Deadlines for both positions: Sat. Oct. 1. Open until filled.

Wesleyan University - Assistant Professor

The Department of Sociology, Wesleyan University, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position, to start July 1, 2012, in economic sociology; or criminology, incarceration, law, and society. PhD required. Apply online. Posting number 8000289.
Deadline: Fri. Sept. 30

Wisconsin Law School - Postdoc Fellowship

One-year fellowship for early-career scholars who work in law and society and who will be competing for university-level teaching jobs in the U.S. market. Apply online.
Deadline: Jan. 9, 2012

A Children and Youth Special Issue

Research Committee 34, Sociology of Youth, International Sociological Association, invites papers for a Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (annual volume published by Emerald Publishing, UK) special issue, "Youth Engagement: The Civic- Political Lives of Children and Youth." Email papers (30 page max) to Sandi Nenga, SU Box 7421, Southwestern University, 1001 E. University Avenue, Georgetown, TX 78626. Publication date: Spring 2013.
Deadline: Jan. 20, 2012

Rutgers Journal of Sociology

The Rutgers Journal of Sociology: Emerging Areas in Sociological Inquiry, invites submissions for its annual edition. Focus is on Knowledge in Contention.
Deadline extended for papers and abstracts: Sat. Oct 15

Princeton - Faculty Visiting Fellowships

Princeton - Faculty Visiting Fellowships

The University Center for Human Values, Princeton University, invites applications for 2012-13 Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellowships.
Deadline: Mon. Nov. 7

University of Missouri - Two Assistant Professors

University of Missouri - Two Assistant Professors

The Department of Sociology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, invites applications for two tenure-track Assistant Professor positions specializing in:
1) Assistant 54032 - Demography. ID 5582
Specialization in urban or aging/gender/life course studies.
Deadline: Tues. Sept. 27

2) Assistant 53867 - Qualitative Methods. ID 5672
Deadline: Wed. Oct. 5
Apply online for both positions. For questions, contact: Prof. Deborah Smith, Director, Family Studies Program, 208 Haag Hall. 5120 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110-2499; (816)235-2529.

"Enemies of the People" Film Screening

Tuesday, October 11, 4:00 PM
Mondale Hall (Law School), Room 25
229 19th Avenue S.
University of Minnesota West Bank


This award-winning documentary follows the story of Thet Sambath, a Cambodian journalist intent on uncovering the secrets of the Khmer Rouge regime whose policies resulted in the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians between 1975 and 1979. Among the dead were Sambath's parents and his brother. To learn the highly protected secrets of the Khmer Rouge, Sambath had to earn the trust of Nuon Chea, the highest ranking Khmer Rouge still alive today.

A discussion with director Rob Lemkin will follow the film.

GWSS Colloquium, Friday Sept. 30, Regina Kunzel

"In Treatment: Sexuality and Psychiatric Scrutiny in the Mid-20th-Century U.S."

Regina Kunzel

Friday September 30, 2011

400 Ford Hall

2-3:30 pm

Regina Kunzel explores the encounter of sexual- and gender-variant people with psychiatry and psychoanalysis in mid-twentieth-century America and examines the role of psychiatric scrutiny and stigma in the making of modern sexuality.


Regina Kunzel is Chair and Professor of the Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies and Paul R. Frenzel Land Grant Chair of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota. Kunzel is author of Criminal Intimacy: Prison and the Uneven History of Modern American Sexuality (University of Chicago Press, 2008), winner of the American Historical Association's John Boswell Prize, the Modern Language Association's Alan Bray Memorial Book Award, and the Lambda Literary Award.

GWSS Fall 2011 Colloquium Schedule: Save the Dates!

Dear all,
Be sure to save the dates for several exciting talks happening in GWSS in Fall of 2011. All GWSS Colloquiums take place on Fridays from 2:00-3:30pm in 400 Ford Hall on the East Bank. Light refreshments will be provided. You are encouraged to print and post the attached flier, as well as forward to your respective list-serves.
We look forward to seeing you there!
Best wishes,
Zenzele Isoke


September 30, 2011

Regina Kunzel, Professor of History and Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

"In Treatment: Sexuality and Psychiatric Scrutiny in the Mid-20th Century U.S."


October 28

Catherine Squires, Cowles Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication

"Revisiting bell hooks"


November 18

Yuichiro Onishi, Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies

"Abbey Lincoln's Japan: Africanity and the Creation of the 1973 Albums"



December 9

Jigna Desai, Associate Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies

"Cinema of Exception, Cinema of Insecurity: Race and Terror in Post-9/11 Media"


Professor Greta Friedemann-Sánchez

Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Will speak on: Unpaid Caregiving in the Development Process


12:45 - 2:0 pm
Tuesday, September 27

170 HHH - Stassen Room

Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Taking care of the family and raising children is the most tangible "output" of unpaid labor and care work by preparing present and future workers needed for economic growth and human development. Yet, traditional measures of development render invisible the production of services and goods that occurs within the context of unpaid labor and caregiving in large part because it is not monetized. Demographic and economic changes in developing nations have had an effect on the distribution of housework versus care work, with the former diminishing and the later increasing. As a result, more attention is being paid to caregiving. The two concepts however, continue to be treated in the development literature as if they were interchangeable. While the contributions that unpaid caregivers provide are beneficial to society, they can have negative consequences on the caregiver: they erode physical and mental health, inhibit educational and training opportunities, and contribute to gender inequality. Drawing on the existing evidence from developed and developing nations, the seminar will define caregiving more narrowly, present a framework for understanding its effects on caregivers, highlight gaps in knowledge for developing nations, and

present outstanding research questions and policy implications.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Ford Foundation Fellowships Program

Starting September 1, 2011 Applications will be accepted for the 2012 Ford Diversity Fellowships Program for Achieving Excellence in College and University Teaching. Full eligibility information and online applications are available on our website at: http://nationalacademies.org/ford


Eligibility Requirements:

* U.S. Citizen or National
* Planning a career in teaching and research at the college or university level in a research-based filed of Science, social science or humanities
*

Stipends and Allowances:

* Predoctoral--$20,000 to the fellow, institutional allowance of $2,000 for three years
* Dissertation--$21,000 for one year
* Postdoctoral--$40,000 for one year, $1,500 employing institution allowance, to be matched by employing institution
*

Awardees have expenses paid to attend one Conference of Ford Fellows.


Approximately 60 predoctoral, 35 dissertation, and 20 postdoctoral fellowships sponsored by the Ford Foundation and administered by the National Research Council of the National Academies.


Application Deadline Dates:

* Predoctoral: November 14, 2011
* Dissertation: November 17, 2011
* Postdoctoral: November 17, 2011
*

For Further information please contact:

Fellowships Office
National Research Council of The National Academies
500 Fifth Street NW
Keck 576
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: 202.334.2872
Fax: 202.334.3419
Email: infofell@nas.edu

Diversity Networking and Scholarship Event

Join the Office for Equity and Diversity and University Career Services for the Diversity Networking and Scholarship Event on Thursday, October 6, 2011 from 3 - 5 p.m. at the University Minneapolis Hotel (formerly the Radisson University Hotel). This event is an opportunity for diverse undergraduate students at the U to:

* Meet and network with representatives from Twin Cities employers who are interested in increasing their organizational diversity
* Talk to scholarship experts on-site to help answer your questions
* Learn about internship opportunities with local corporations and government agencies.

Undergraduate students who identify with one or more of the communities served by the Office for Equity and Diversity (GLBT, students of color, women, and students with disabilities) are encouraged to attend.To learn more and to register, visit http://z.umn.edu/diversityevent.

GEOGRAPHY COFFEE HOUR FRI. 23 SEPTEMBER 2011: JSA Rm (Blegen 445), Coffee & Cookies 3:15 pm, Talk 3:30 pm


[Inaugural Cowles Chair for the Study of Public Service at the University of Minnesota, with faculty positions in the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Dept. of Political Science and Dept. of Sociology]


My talk will focus on devolution as a facet of neoliberal poverty governance, clarifying its role in efforts to discipline the poor. The politics of scale in contemporary poverty governance, I will argue, are deeply entwined with the politics of race and ethnicity. Federalism functions in this area of governance as a key mechanism for the production of racial inequalities. The recent turn toward policy devolution has also produced a variegated system of poverty governance in which state and local regimes are closely calibrated to the features of geographically diverse political economies. The devolution settlements that operate in poverty governance today, however, should not be misunderstood as a hand-off of policy discretion from higher- to lower-level jurisdictions. They operate as a system of power relations designed to foster particular kinds of governing mentalities. Key features of relations across scale -- such as outcome benchmarks, performance measures, asymmetric choice structures, incentives, penalties, and so on -- work to discipline lower-level authorities as governing subjects so that can be relied on to carry out the work of disciplining the poor.


slavery and human trafficking in minnesota

Greetings from Across the River (Macalester College)

Jean Kilde (Classics and Near Eastern Studies) and Lisa Norling ( History) have suggested to me that information regarding local efforts now underway to combat human trafficking and slavery might be of interest to you, particularly in light of your upcoming screening of your film.

My name is Jim Stewart, Emeritus in History at Macalester College and I'll be speaking on your campus on Friday Oct 21 to open the Calvin and Caroline Roetzel endowed lecture series for the Classics and Near Eastern Studies Department.

This message's aim is not to boost attendance for my talk ( you're already warmly invited) which will be about slavery today as well as in the past.

Instead I'd like to draw your attention to efforts underway at Macalester to organize a substantial antislavery movement here in Minnesota.

Our efforts are sponsored by a national organization, Historians Against Slavery, with over 400 members on campuses across the United States. Its mission is to create linked networks of campus-based antislavery societies that sponsor new scholarship, create new curriculum, stimulate awareness and that promote involvement with the wider community. The link to its website is http://historiansagainstslavery.org

Minnesota's introduction to this initiative will take place on October 20 at Macalester the evening before my appearance on your campus. Mac-Antislavery, ( our new antislavery society), is sponsoring a major public event featuring Joy Friedman, survivor of more than 25 years of sexual enslavement, a leading figure in St. Paul antislavery work and nationally acclaimed as an extraordinarily powerful and informative speaker.

Our "tag' is "Mac-Antislavery knows no campus boundaries" and we are working hard from the start to involve other campuses.
So you are indeed being warmly encouraged to attend our event and will be receiving publicity about it as Oct. 20 draws closer

If this message piques your interest and if you'd like to know more, please feel free to contact me.

Most Cordially,

Jim Stewart.

James Brewer Stewart
James Wallace Professor of History Emeritus
Macalester College
651-696-6496
Coordinator, Historians Against Slavery
http://historiansagainstslavery.org/
http://antislaverybugle.blogspot.com/
http://diverseeducation.com/article/15706/

Religion, Gender and AIDS: What's Wrong with Patriarchy?

ICGC Distinguished Lecture Series presents


Dr. Miranda Pillay

University of the Western Cape

20 September 2011
Lippincott Room, 1314 Social Sciences Tower
3:30-5pm
Reception to follow

This lecture reflects on the reality of many women and girl‐children who are not in a position (in terms of culture, economics or religion) to negotiate safer sex or challenge male headship in an AIDS era. It also reflects on the powerlessness of many women (not only) in South African society resulting from the power and privilege given to men in a patriarchal society - power that is justified and sanctified by culture and religion. All religions impact on how men and women understand themselves as sexual beings (explicitly or implicitly) but in this lecture I speak as a Christian woman, and as such will limit my focus to Christianity. Throughout the lecture I will explore, illuminate and challenge the question which underpins this lecture, "What's wrong with patriarchy? - it works!" from a feminist theo‐ethical perspective.


Okechukwu Nwafor

Department of History and Center for Humanities Research,
University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa
ICGC Fellow, University of Minnesota, Fall 2011

FRIDAY 16 SEPTEMBER
537 HELLER HALL
12 PM

In this presentation, I seek to problematize prevailing views of what is known as aso ebi in Nigeria which place emphasis on solidarity and conviviality. In its most common import, Aso ebi refers to uniformed solidarity dressing worn by friends and family members to distinguish themselves from the rest during important social events such as weddings, street parties, birthday parties, among others. By challenging the moral economy of intimacy, I show that aso ebi's solidarity is constructed along bodily attire rather than along its purported claims to 'real' friendship or unity. The presentation shows that aso ebi's type of friendly and political solidarities are mere rhetoric. They are also indirectly forceful and exclusionary. Their exclusionary tendencies could have been informed by a social convention that recognizes uniform as the only yardstick for measuring solidarity, friendship and oneness. By employing Herbert Blumer's theoretical models of espirit de corps, and Marcel Mauss' logic of the gifts, I both engage the discourse of solidarity and gift-giving in aso ebi practice.

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