Recently in Call for papers Category

We are pleased to announce the fourth call for submissions for Reconsidering Development, an interdisciplinary
E-journal based at the University of Minnesota. The journal is theme-based and contributors are encouraged to be creative in integrating themes of each issue into their submissions.

The first issue of Volume III, Reconsidering Development and Human Rights will be launched in the spring of 2012 and the deadline for submissions is February 1, 2012. We seek submissions that explore the relationship between human rights theory and practice and international development.

We seek submissions that push theoretical boundaries. We do not believe this requires the explicit language of theory but we encourage authors to address disciplinary and theoretical assumptions. We offer the following questions and encourage that submitters use the following core questions as guides to help our audience understand development from your theoretical, disciplinary, or practical perspective:

How does an interdisciplinary perspective (or a novel disciplinary approach) shift our conceptualization of human rights (legal framework, policy, practice) in development and how does this perspective on human rights shape the theory, practice, and/or experience of international development?
What trends and issues affect the pursuit of human rights in international development contexts?
What is the future of international development? In what ways, if at all, will the relationship between human rights and the international community shape the future of development projects?

We seek submissions from multiple theoretical and practical perspectives, disciplines, vantage points, and sectors expressed through innovative formats, including but not limited to video, audio, written, and artistic forms of media. For each submission, international development issues must be made central. Additionally, we seek submissions that engage a broad audience. Submissions will be accepted based on the following criteria:

- Fit with Call for Submissions- Submitters must be explicit in the abstract and arguments made in the submission about how their piece fits with the theme of the issue.
- Clarity of argument - Submitters must be clear about the argument they are making with the piece.
- Application to general audience- Our readership includes academics and practitioners from a wide variety of fields. We seek pieces that clearly elaborate how the argument being made affects multiple readers.
- Significance of contribution- The "So what?" question must be addressed in each piece. Who is your audience? Why does your piece matter to your audience? What does your contribution add to the theory and practice of development?

The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2012

Submissions can be uploaded at http://rdj.ipid-umn.org
*Note: if submissions include different media types, i.e. text, video, audio, photos, each file should be uploaded separately. Submissions may also be emailed to rdj-editor@ipid-umn.org.

Please forward this call to any colleagues, students, or practitioners who may be interested in publishing with Reconsidering Development.

Professor Edward Goetz

Humphrey School of Public Affairs and Director, Center for Urban and Regional Affairs
will speak on:

"Urban Planning Challenges in Sub-Saharan Africa:The Case of Dar es Salaam"

Many urban areas in sub Saharan Africa are growing rapidly and straining the public sector's s ability to provide sufficient housing, transportation, and other infrastructure. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania is typical in this respect. Professor Goetz will consider how well infrastructure needs are being met and the challenges that remain.

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, October 25
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Reconsidering Development Call for Submissions

We are pleased to announce the third call for submissions for Reconsidering Development, an interdisciplinary E-journal based at the University of Minnesota. The journal is theme-based but contributors are encouraged to be creative in integrating themes of each issue into their submissions.

Our third issue, Reconsidering Development and the "Institutions," will be launched in the fall of 2011. We seek submissions that explore both institutions of development (i.e., trade, bilateral aid, military, charity organizations) and development institutions (i.e., World Bank, United Nations).

Submissions are encouraged to use the following core questions as guides to help our audience reconsider development from interdisciplinary perspectives:

1. How does an interdisciplinary perspective (or a specific disciplinary approach) shift our conceptualization of institutions of development or of the role of development institutions in shaping the theory, practice, and/or experience of international development?
2. What are the trends and issues affecting current "institutions" of international development?
3. What is the future of international development, including the relationship between 'institutions of development' and 'development institutions' and the international community?

We seek submissions from multiple theoretical and practical perspectives, disciplines, vantage points, and sectors expressed through innovative formats, including but not limited to video, audio, written, and artistic forms of media. For each submission, international development issues must be made central. Additionally, we seek submissions that engage a broad audience.

Submissions can be uploaded at http://rdj.ipid-umn.org

*Note: if submissions include different media types, i.e. text, video, audio, photos, each file should be uploaded separately. Submissions may also be emailed to rdj-editor@ipid-umn.org.

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2011

For the full Call for Submissions, go to : http://journal.ipid-umn.org/node/96



About Us

Reconsidering Development is an innovative, open-access journal that aims to create an equitable space for the flourishing of dialogue and discussion concerning the theory and practice of international development. We aim to advance theoretical momentum through the inclusion of voices representing those individuals, communities, and institutions affected by and affecting development. We hope that this deliberate fusion of experiences will help to transform and push the boundaries of the knowledge around which development theory and practice has been built.

Reconsidering Development particularly encourages submissions that reflect the diverse perspectives of underrepresented voices, creative methodologies, and contemporary forms of expression in order to reconsider the broader field of development. We intentionally target and seek to include an international audience by creating an easily-loadable and readable format that is easily accessed regardless of Internet bandwidth limitations.

[ISDPA] Call for Papers - Sports in Africa

Friends and Colleagues,

Here is the call for papers for the 8th Sports in Africa Conference. This year conference is early April and incorporates the Global South.

If you have any question, suggestion or comment please send me an email at akindesg@ohio.edu.


A Children and Youth Special Issue

Research Committee 34, Sociology of Youth, International Sociological Association, invites papers for a Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (annual volume published by Emerald Publishing, UK) special issue, "Youth Engagement: The Civic- Political Lives of Children and Youth." Email papers (30 page max) to Sandi Nenga, SU Box 7421, Southwestern University, 1001 E. University Avenue, Georgetown, TX 78626. Publication date: Spring 2013.
Deadline: Jan. 20, 2012

Rutgers Journal of Sociology

The Rutgers Journal of Sociology: Emerging Areas in Sociological Inquiry, invites submissions for its annual edition. Focus is on Knowledge in Contention.
Deadline extended for papers and abstracts: Sat. Oct 15

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Contingent Belongings: Queer Reflections on Race, Space, and the State

University of Minnesota, September 16-17, 2011

Keynote speakers:

Christina Hanhardt, Department of American Studies, University of Maryland

Christina Hanhardt will speak about her forthcoming book, Safe Space:
The Sexual and City Politics of Violence, which examines U.S.-based
LGBT activism against violence since the mid-1960s in the context of
the race- and class-stratified city.

Nayan Shah, Department of History, University of California, San Diego

Nayan Shah will speak about his forthcoming book, Stranger Intimacy:
Contesting Race, Sexuality and the Law in the North American West.
Shah is the author of Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San
Francisco's Chinatown.

The field of queer studies has made important contributions to
interrogating the notion of belonging as a technology of cultural,
social, and political membership. Yet scholarship in sexuality studies
has not always attended to the multiple contingencies that structure
belonging, particularly in relation to the unevenness of spatial and
racial formations that shape access to cultural and national
citizenship. Recent discussions of homonormativity and homonationalism
have demonstrated the importance of understanding how social and
political belonging are contingent upon the exclusion of certain
bodies and practices. The recent repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell and
the criminalization of immigration with the passage of SB1070
illustrate the contradictory logics of national, sexual, and racial
belonging.

This conference examines the contingencies of belonging in relation to
racial and sexual imaginaries and practices. How can we understand the
desire to belong? What are the costs of belonging, and who can refuse
to belong? Who gets to determine the framework for belonging? What
does resistance look like under these conditions?

We hope to create a vibrant space for intellectual exchange with an
emphasis on interdisciplinary scholarship. We welcome submissions from
faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars from a wide range
of fields, including gender and sexuality studies, ethnic studies,
American studies, geography, history, education, media and
communication, and cultural studies, among others.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

- immigration, citizenship, and law

- space, movement, and diaspora

- intimacy, kinship, and family

- affect and desire

- U.S. empire and settler colonialism

- labor, neoliberalism, and biopolitics

- culture as a site of critique/resistance/knowledge production

- activism and coalition

- queer world-making and alternative practices

- aesthetics and decolonization

- race, place, and identity

Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief bio of no more
than 100 words to contingentbelongings@gmail.com by JUNE 20, 2011.
Conference applicants will be notified by July 15th.

The Black Atlantic: Colonial and Contemporary Exchanges

Stanford University, California
October 28-29, 2011
DEADLINE: June 1, 2011

The Stanford Forum for African Studies (SFAS) invites proposals for papers by graduate
students, scholars, and faculty on the topics of slavery, migration and the African Diaspora, and how each of these affect social, economic, and political development in Africa in the past and present.

Interested participants should submit abstracts by email to stanfordfas@gmail.com.
Please also include your name, affiliation and contact details.

This interdisciplinary conference aims to examine the vestiges of the slave trade, and economic and cultural exchanges more broadly, both within and from Africa. Scholars and activists have traditionally addressed matters relating to economic inequality, hierarchical racial segregation and ideology, the transfer of cultural realities presented in art, music, and rituals. The symposium seeks, therefore, to shed light on the effect of forced and voluntary migration on identity and culture, and on social, economic, and political development in Africa and in the African Diaspora. We are soliciting proposals that combine insights, methods, and research from both the social sciences and the humanities, including the fields of anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature, political science, and psychology among others.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

· Identity formation in the Diaspora
· The spread and influence of African culture, art, and music
· The role of technology in connecting migrants to their home countries
· Regional integration and the economic effects of migration within Africa
· Brain drain out of Africa
· Migration and its relation to political and economic development in Africa
· The role of remittances in modern day Africa
· The slave trade present in literature and/or music in the Americas

Please contact Melina Platas at mplatas@stanford.edu with any further questions.

*Student Speaker Conference Call for Submissions*

IPID is a student-led initiative that brings together graduate students from across the University who are actively engaged in development studies. On the afternoon of Friday, April 22, 2011 IPID will host its second Student Speaker Conference. The theme for this semester's event is:


"Power, Participation, and Development: Who's In Control?"


We are soliciting papers and visual art (such as photo essays) from graduate students across all departments in the University that demonstrate an advanced level of critical and creative thinking, up to five of which will be selected for presentation. At the event, each selected student will give a 15-20 minute presentation based on his or her paper or artistic piece, followed by a brief Q&A. After all speakers have made their presentations, there will be a moderated panel session with all presenters and open discussion to tie together the ideas presented. The conference will be recorded and the papers and artistic pieces will be published on IPID's website (http://blog.lib.umn.edu/ipid/ipid/).

The event's theme is intentionally broadly defined. IPID seeks submissions from a diversity of theoretical and practical perspectives and disciplines, regarding any relevant issue, event, population, or geographic area to the theme. The moderated panel will explore linkages between papers and works based on theoretical questions such as the following; however, when considering topics to submit, please do not feel limited by these ideas:

How does an interdisciplinary perspective, and your particular disciplinary perspective, affect our conceptualization of who holds power, how power is wielded, and who can participate in the discourse or practice of international development?
What role do particular groups of participants have in international development, and how can they be identified, studied, aided, contested or otherwise engaged via specific disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives?

What are the trends and issues affecting current approaches to power and participation in international development?


Please submit abstracts of up to 500 words (including paper title), or a link to your photo(s) and an accompanying written piece of up to 500 words (either as an attached essay or as captions to each photo) along with a short bio, to Peter Ehresmann (ehres014@umn.edu) with the subject line: "IPID Submission."

Deadline: noon on Sunday March 27th, 2011

IPID is putting out Call For Submissions, including visual art submissions for our Spring Student Speaker Conference. - Deadline is noon Sunday Mar 27th, so time is short. Please tell everyone and post the attached doc everywhere, though submissions are limited to University of Minnesota graduate students.

The conference will be held Friday April 22nd 2-6pm place TBA.

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