Recently in Workshops Category


Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy


Professor Ruth Okediji

Law School

will speak on:

Innovating Around Intellectual Property: Culture, Traditional Knowledge and

Trade in the Goods that Embody Them

12:45 - 2:00 pm, Tuesday, December 6

170 HHH - Stassen Room Humphrey School, West Bank UMN Campus

The process and substance of efforts to protect the traditional knowledge (TK) of indigenous communities--both at the national and multilateral levels--reflect the resilience of the entrenched assumptions that sustain the global intellectual property (IP) system. For some observers, TK protection is simply another regime of proprietary rights that lacks appropriate mechanisms to support the production of public goods needed for economic development. Importantly, there remains a persistent notion that the two regimes can and will remain in distinct (if related) spheres and will realize independently verifiable objectives. Professor Okediji will argue that this is highly unlikely. Indeed, while negotiations over a TK treaty are advancing, there also has been an acceleration of efforts to strengthen the global network of IP regimes in ways that explicitly undermine innovation and heighten barriers to access to those very goods aimed at improving public welfare. The multilateral space for trade regulation is increasingly designed around strong legal protection for knowledge goods; in light of this TK protection as currently constructed may undermine the public welfare values of IP policy and simultaneously devalue the public interest norms around which TK is ideally organized.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Rashmi Singh on The National Mission for the Empowerment of Women
November 1, 2011 11:30--12:30 Lunch and Informal Discussion

12:45--2 A Global Policy Workshop Lecture

Room 180, Humphrey Center Lunch Provided: RSVP finne006@umn.edu

Rashmi Singh was one of Delhi's first administrative officers selected to study in

Minnesota through the Government of India's Ministry of Personnel and Training. She is back in Minnesota this fall to receive the University of Minnesota's prestigious International Leadership Award for her work in the poorest neighborhoods of New Delhi. Her latest effort, the National Mission for the Empowerment of Women, builds on the game changing initiative she founded, Mission Convergence, to substantially re-engineered the delivery of human services in New Delhi.

Co-sponsored by The Center on Women and Public Policy and the Freeman Center for International Economic Policy

Global Spotlight Workshop: Developing a grants budget, Nov. 4th

Looking for grants? Building a clear budget is an essential part in developing a strong grants proposal.

Developing a Grants budget proposal workshop will train applicants to prepare an accurate and responsible budget:

- Budget justifications
- Clarifications on what to include or exclude from a budget

- Budgeting for research abroad and what to consider
- University resources to support grant development

This workshop is open to all interested students, with Global Spotlight grant applicants especially encouraged to attend.


Friday, November 4, 2011, 3:00 - 4:00 pm
100 University Int'l Center (map)

RSVP here (RSVPs optional but helpful)

For more information on the Global Spotlight 2012 Grants Program, visit - http://global.umn.edu/spotlight/grants/students.html#doctoral


The Medieval and Early Modern Interdisciplinary Graduate Workshop (ie Ye Olde Workshoppe) eagerly announces its inaugural meeting for the 2011-12 school year. This Friday at 10am in Heller 1024 we will be discussing Katie Sisneros's (English) dissertation chapter "Tories and Turks: Propaganda and the Battle of Vienna in English Broadside Ballads" with Prof. Giancarlo Casale (History) providing a comment. Copies of the chapter will be available in the History TA office (Heller 930) or digitally. If you have any questions or wish to have a digital copy of the paper, please contact Ann Zimo (zimox001@umn.edu).

Come join the discussion and enjoy some bagels and coffee!


Equity and Diversity Spring 2011 Workshop Series

The Office for Equity and Diversity (OED) has posted its educational calendar for Spring 2011. Workshops focus on a wide range of equity and diversity issues in higher education. For more information and to register.


Spring 2011 workshops:

GLBT Ally Training I - Feb 17

Equity and Diversity in the Search Process - Feb 22

Sexual Harassment Awareness & Prevention: General Introduction - Mar 8

Religious Accommodation at the U of M - Mar 15

(Bi)Sexuality 101 - Mar 23

Appreciating Differences - Apr 5

Addressing Bullying Behavior in the Workplace - Apr 14 (NEW)

GLBT Ally Training II - Apr 19

Building Capacity: Engaging Allies and Challenging Burnout - April 22 (NEW - details and registration available soon)

Developing Intercultural Skills & Competency (Using the IDI) - Apr 28

Help, I.m Being Discriminated Against - May 5 (NEW)

Resolving Conflict Across Cultures - May 24

Workshop on Global Policy

Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Professor Mani Subramani

Carlson School of Management

will speak on:

Changing Motives for Global Sourcing: From Labor Arbitrage to Innovation

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 26
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus


One of the key drivers for global sourcing has been the ability to leverage the lower costs - typically lower labor costs - overseas. While increased competitiveness through the lowering of costs continues to be an important goal, it is increasingly becoming evident that overseas suppliers and a firm's overseas operations can also contribute to firm competitiveness by enhancing the level of innovation in new product development and in business process execution. There are a number of firms on the leading edge of this movement such as GE, Boeing, and PepsiCo and their initial successes offer a variety of
lessons for both large and medium sized firms to take advantage of these
new opportunities created by the global diffusion of capabilities.

Professor Subramani is a faculty member in the Carlson School and teaches an MBA course titled "Managing Globally" that incorporates a field trip to India with the students. He will draw on his experience of the changes he and the students have witnessed in over the past seven years to share his views on how global sourcing can be an important driver of a firm's innovation.


All are welcome! Refreshments will be served


Freeman Center for International Economic Policy,
Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs,
presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Neerada Jacob
Belfer Center, Kennedy School, Harvard University

will speak on:

Can Sanctions Prevent the Spread of Nuclear Weapons?

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 12
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Economic sanctions have long been derided as ineffective instruments of foreign policy. At the same time, however, they continue to remain a principal tool for preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons by nations. Drawing on the cases of Iraq and Libya, Ms. Jacob will show that sanctions tend to be more successful when they are one component of an overall coercive strategy. The talk will address factors affecting the impact of sanctions on nuclear programs. Research from the case studies of Taiwan and Iran will also be briefly discussed, ultimately laying out the complexities involved.


All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Gender/Asia Seminar Series & Sociology Workshop Series
present

Professor Raka Ray University of CA-Berkeley

*Professor Lisa Park, respondent

This talk examines the ways in which the servant-employing middle and upper classes in Kolkata produce and reproduce class at home through the maintenance and cultivation of distinction. The operations of distinction make natural and normal the relationship of exploitation which undergirds the institution of domestic servitude in India and elsewhere. In Kolkata's culture of servitude, distinction can take myriad forms, but the trope of distance between employers and servants - be it physical/spatial or metaphorical/emotional - is critical. In the spatiality of the old order - the big house with servants' quarters - servants are said to be everywhere and nowhere, and their presence unobtrusive. In the relatively curtailed space of the flat, servants are considered to be underfoot and infringing on privacy. Employers try to maintain distinction from servants by segregating the servant body through the politics and practices of eating, sitting, sleeping, bathing, and clothing. Employer anxieties and servant aspirations come to the fore as distinctions begin to blur with emerging discourses of democracy and rights in the home and the city.


Wednesday, April 13
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
710 Social Sciences


Sponsors: Institute for Global Studies, Dept. of Sociology & Institute for Advanced Studies

Emerging Global Order colloquium

28-29 April 2011 at the University of Minnesota Practicing Science, Technology and Rhetoric: The North-South Divide in an Emerging Global Order

Colloquium on Technology, Culture, & Communication

Description. This colloquium will highlight work being done at the University of Minnesota exploring the interdependent and global nature of contemporary science and technology practices. Participants will explore how those who work within institutions of science and/or employ emerging technologies, like (but not limited to) new information and communication technologies (ICTS), frame political, economic, cultural, and environmental arguments about the impacts of their practices on "others". In particular, we will focus on how the diffusion of contemporary science and technology practices plays out in transnational projects that span the divide between countries in the global North and South.

See full description and call for participation

Thursday, April 28: Institute for Advanced Study Thursday at Four
presentation in Nolte 125
Friday, April 29: Interdisciplinary Center for Global Change sponsored
in Studio E Rarig Center

Please contact Bernadette Longo (blongo@umn.edu) for additional information.

See description of collection planned as a result of this April colloquium.

See Call for Papers relating to the colloquium for a special issue of Science, Technology & Human Values

The Freeman Center for International Economic Policy sponsors a Global Policy Seminar/Workshop series every other Tuesday from 12:45 to 2:00 pm. All sessions are held in the Stassen Room (Room 170) of the Humphrey Center. The remaining talks for the semester are: April 12 - Nareeda Jacob on Sanctions and Nuclear Weapons April 26- Mani Subramani on Global Outsourcing Freeman Center for International Economic Policy, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a Workshop on Global Policy

Neerada Jacob
Belfer Center, Kennedy School, Harvard University

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, April 12
170 HHH - Stassen Room
Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

Economic sanctions have long been derided as ineffective instruments of foreign policy. At the same time, however, they continue to remain a principal tool for preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons by nations. Drawing on the cases of Iraq and Libya, Ms. Jacob will show that sanctions tend to be more successful when they are one component of an overall coercive strategy. The talk will address factors affecting the impact of sanctions on nuclear programs. Research from the case studies of Taiwan and Iran will also be briefly discussed, ultimately laying out the complexities involved.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served


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