MIRC presents Sarah Parkinson, Oct. 28

Dear all,

We are pleased to announce that on Monday, October 28th, Dr. Sarah Parkinson of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs will be speaking at MIRC. The talk will be held at 1:30 PM in 1314 Social Sciences.

Dr. Parkinson will be presenting a talk entitled "The Old Guard and the Die Hards: Generational Effects, Money, and Cohesion in Militant Organizations." An abstract for the talk can be found below, and a copy of the event poster is attached. If you would like to read a hard copy of the paper prior to the talk, copies are available in 1414 Social Sciences, outside of 1208 Social Sciences, and outside of 245 Humphrey.

Please feel free to disseminate this announcement to anyone who might be interested. All are welcome!

Best,
The MIRC Team


Abstract:
How does access to external funding affect militant organizations' structures and behaviors? Recent events in the Middle East have spurred extensive debate over the impact of providing financial support and non-lethal aid to insurgencies in countries such as Libya and Syria. These deliberations not only force scholars to examine the causes and geopolitical consequences of economic intervention in civil war, but also to study the relationship between rebel finance and militants' long-term adaptive trajectories. Drawing on over nine months of organizational ethnography among Fateh cadres in Lebanon, this paper argues the ways that militants talk about money provide key insights into their conceptualization of organizational membership and into their reflexivity as political and social actors. I demonstrate that in Fateh, money-centered discourse--specifically, money talk transmitted through rumors, complaints, and jokes--flows across gender, age, family, and subunit divisions and produce different organizational "generations" depending on time of recruitment. This paper thus challenges extant research on the economics of rebellion by examining non-material aspects of finance and by connecting money talk to militant behavior.

Parkinson_Poster_10.28.13.pdf

Please join one of Germany's sustainability leaders and a group of Minnesotans for an engaging and informative talk on "Carbon-Neutral Germany: Imagining the Possible" on Monday, Oct. 28, 3:30-5:00 PM at Cowles Auditorium in the Humphrey School.

Who: A guaranteed engaging speaker from Germany and some Minnesota sustainability heavy weights

Dr. Harry Lehmann, head of sustainability, Germany's Federal Environment Agency (UBA)
MN state Rep. Melissa Hortman, chair, House Energy committee
MN state Sen. John Marty, chair, Senate Environment & Energy Policy committee
Rolf Nordstrom, exec. director, Great Plains Institute
Frances Lawrenz, associate vice president for research, U of M
Steve Kelley, deputy director, Center for Integrative Leadership

What: "Carbon-Neutral Germany: Imagining the Possible"
When: Monday, Oct. 28, 3:30-5:00 PM
Where: Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
http://www1.umn.edu/twincities/maps/HHHSPA/

FREE and open to the public

ABSTRACT:
Germany is betting on renewable energy as an engine for regional economic development. At Germany's federal Environment Agency, policy experts and researchers are modeling renewable energy solutions that will transform life across Germany. Is it possible to imagine 100% sustainability solutions? Dr. Harry Lehmann, head of the agency's sustainability division, presents the most recent data. He is joined on stage by a group of Minnesota energy policy experts who discuss opportunities in Minnesota for picking up on some of Germany's most exciting strategies. Be part of the conversation!

https://events.umn.edu/030955

--
DAAD Center for German & European Studies
University of Minnesota
214 Social Sciences Building
267 19th Ave. South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: (612) 626-7705
Fax: (612) 625-0528
Email: cges@umn.edu
www.cges.umn.edu


The Center for German& European Studies is host of the annual "American& German Healthcare Forum," a unique venue for direct exchange on health policy and best practices between Minnesotans and Germans. Conference documentation and other materials are available at: http://www.cges.umn.edu/outreach/forum.htm

The Freeman Center for International Economic Policy sponsors the Global Policy Seminar/Workshop series every other Tuesday. The sessions are held from 12:45 to 2:00 pm in the Stassen Room (Room 170) of the Humphrey School. The next two presentations are:

November 5 - Sherry Gray on China Today

November 19 - Paul Vaaler on Diaspora Institutions

-----------------------------------

Freeman Center for International Economic Policy,
Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, presents a
Workshop on Global Policy

Professor Sarah Parkinson

Humphrey School

will speak on:

The Old Guard and the Die Hards: Generational Effects, Money, and Cohesion in Militant Organizations

12:45 - 2:00 pm
Tuesday, October 22

The Stassen Room (Room 170)

Humphrey School, West Bank Campus

How does access to external funding affect militant organizations' structures and behaviors? Recent events in the Middle East have spurred extensive debate over the impact of providing financial support and non-lethal aid to insurgencies in countries such as Libya and Syria. These deliberations not only force scholars to examine the causes and geopolitical consequences of economic intervention in civil war, but also to study the relationship between rebel finance and militants' long-term adaptive trajectories. Drawing on over nine months of organizational ethnography among Fateh cadres in Lebanon, this paper argues that the ways militants talk about money provide key insights into their conceptualization of organizational membership and into their reflexivity as political and social actors. Professor Parkinson demonstrates that in Fateh, money-centered discourse--specifically, money talk transmitted through rumors, complaints, and jokes--flows across gender, age, family, and subunit divisions and produces different organizational "generations" depending on time of recruitment. This paper thus challenges extant research on the economics of rebellion by examining non-material aspects of finance and by connecting money talk to militant behavior.

All are welcome! Refreshments will be served

Erasures: Gender, Violence and Human Rights

International Human Rights Symposium


DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH & PORTUGUESE STUDIES
International Symposium
Erasures: Gender, Violence and Human Rights

This significant symposium will address violence against women as a human rights violation, the erasure of gender violence in cultural debates about human rights, and the epistemic revolts of the rethinking of violence from a gender perspective.


Thursday & Friday, October 24th & 25th
9:00am to 5:00pm
Maroon & Gold Room, McNamara Alumni Center

Speakers presenting include, Susana Trimarco (Plenary Speaker), Rosa Linda Fregoso, Karina Ansolabehere, Héctor Dominguez Revalcaba, Susan Berk-Seligson, Maria Sonderéguer, Greta Friedemann-Sánchez, Raul Marrero Fente, Ana Amado, Ileana Rodriguez, Shannon Drysdale Walsh and Kimberley Theidon
Flyer Attached

Erasures flyer.pdf

Joe Cirincione, President, Ploughshares Fund



Tuesday, October 15, 2013
4:30 - 6 p.m.
Cowles Auditorium

Joe Cirincione is widely seen as the foremost nuclear non-proliferation advocate in the United States. An accomplished author and member of the Secretary of State's International Security Advisory Board, he has worked in Congress, at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, at the Stimson Center, and at the Center for American Progress. Cirincione will address nuclear proliferation challenges--and avoidance of nightmares--surrounding Iran, North Korea, India, Pakistan, and other parts of the world.


This event is part of the Humphrey School's Autumn Global Policy Series, reflecting the school's commitment to public engagement on critical issues of international relations, human security, and global civic engagement. This fall, we will host four distinguished experts and advocates on issues relating to human rights, citizen involvement in global movements, non-proliferation, and the Middle East.


Event is free and open to the public
For parking and directions please go to:
http://www.hhh.umn.edu/contact/parking.html
To request disability accommodations, please call 612-625-5309 or email hhhevent@umn.edu
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer

Oct 11 Same Sun Happy Hour features Humphrey International Fellow
Andrés Pérez on transparency & accountability in Colombia' s security
sector

Friday, October 11 3-­‐4:30pm
International Fellowship Program Lounge HHH 55

Mr. Pérez is currently a Police Officer with the National Police of
Colombia. He is an adviser to the General Director of the Police,
focusing on the management of the police information system. Mr. Pérez
received a degree in business administration from EAN University, a
degree in police management from National Police Academy "General
Santander" in Bogotá, and a master's in Management with specialization
in organizations research from Université Pierre Mendès in Grenoble,
France. His main duties include designing strategic planning
methodologies to monitor the performance of public safety policy, and
guidelines for transparency and accountability for each one of the
decentralized units in the country.

This week's topic: Transparency and Accountability in the Colombian
Security Sector

You are invited to join the Humphrey International Fellows for the
Same Sun Happy Hour Same Sun flyer Oct 11.pdf

Same Sun flyer Oct 11.pdf

October 16: Lecture by Professor Mel Chen, UC Berkeley

Please join the Graduate Interdisciplinary Group in Sexuality Studies for a lecture
by Mel Chen, Associate Professor of Gender & Women's Studies, U.C. Berkeley

Wednesday, October 16, 2013
5:30-6:30pm
1210 Heller Hall

Mel Chen, Associate Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at UC Berkeley will be presenting on their latest book, Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering and Queer Affect. Professor Chen's work examines how objects are animated to serve in racialized, sexualized, and queered narratives about "invasion," disability and illness. Chen's work has been published in GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, Women's Studies Quarterly, and Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture.


Sponsored by: Graduate Interdisciplinary Group in Sexuality Studies Coca-Cola Activities Initiative Grant Women's Student Activist Collective Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies Department of American Studies

Association of Black Woman in Higher Education

Sam Daley-Harris: Reclaiming Our Democracy

Reclaiming Our Democracy Sam Daley-Harris Founder of the international development advocacy group, RESULTS and CEO, Center for Citizen Empowerment & Transformation

Wednesday, October 9, 2013
5:30 - 7 p.m.
Cowles Auditorium

sam-daley-harris.pngSam Daley-Harris--author, activist, and social entrepreneur--discusses the role of citizens' organizations in global movements involving microfinance, child survival, and climate change. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary edition of his work, Reclaiming Our Democracy, he will reflect on the efforts by ordinary citizens around the world to transform hopelessness into powerful advocacy. Humphrey School Senior Fellow and resident grassroots democracy philosopher Dr. Harry Boyte will offer comments.

Register

Global Policy Series:
This event is the second in the Humphrey School's Autumn Global Policy Series, which will also include leading experts on non-proliferation and the Middle East.
Please join us for our other events:

Joe Cirincione: October 15
Shibley Telhami: November 5

All events are free and open to the public
For parking and directions please go to:
http://www.hhh.umn.edu/contact/parking.html
To request disability accommodations, please call 612-625-5309 or email hhhevent@umn.edu
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer

Dear all,
The Political Theory Colloquium will host the first of our grad student-led reading groups this Friday (Lippincott--social science 1314) from 1:30-3:00. Our discussion this week will focus on settler colonialism and the dynamics of settler-Indigenous conflict within our broader thematic of "disordering empire." We'll be reading the below texts as a way of guiding our conversation, so for those who plan to attend, please have these read by the meeting.

David Temin will open up the meeting and conversation with a few brief remarks on settler colonialism as a framework for investigating different imperial-settler sites and the diverse set of questions such a lens helps us to raise about power, Indigeneity, empire, democracy, and decolonization. Then we'll focus our discussion on the following texts suggested by Adam Dahl on settler colonialism in New Zealand:

The Treaty of Waitangi: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/politics/treaty/read-the-treaty/english-text. Please read the treaty, as well as the following sketch of the differences between the Maori and English versions of the treaty: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/politics/treaty/read-the-Treaty/differences-between-the-texts

JGA Pocock, "Law, Sovereignty, and History in a Divided Culture: The Case of New Zealand and The Treaty of Waitangi" from The Discovery of Islands (please find attached)

We look forward to a productive discussion as we kick off our reading groups this semester and continue our conversation about empire.

As usual, fresh-brewed coffee will be served.

Best,
Minnesota Political Theory Colloquium

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