November 2012 Archives

Issues Facing Our Global Youth

| No Comments

I argue the most serious issue facing our global youth today is war and oppression. Our world is filled with war and violence. In Africa there are wars, violence and oppression in Darfur, Somalia, The Republic of Congo, Libya, Nigeria, Sudan, etc. In Asia there is Burma-Myanmar, Sri Lanka, etc. In the Middle East there is Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Afghanistan, Turkey, Syria, Palestine, etc. Furthermore, there is so much horrific violence in the United States. We have disgustingly high high amounts of murder, rape and further violence. How are our global youth to thrive when they live in a world so torn over ignorance and fear? What is a world like the one we live in teaching them?

Furthermore, women and children are most often the worst victims of war, violence and oppression. Whether it be from the war itself (bombs, mass slaughters, etc) or lack of food, water, work/income, thus suffering from overall poverty. Unfortunately, war, violence and oppression happen so often, they are simply apart of all of our lives (some more than others). As a world of many nations, we have adapted to our dysfunction, internalized the oppression we face and afflict on others. So, I ask again, what our we teaching our youth?

To demonstrate the issue of war, violence and oppression. I have chosen a spoken word artist Staceyann Chin and her poem "All Oppression is Connected". I agree with Chin and her words. All oppression is connected. Everyday we all are apart of it. Whether we buy items from clothing stores that are operated under sweatshops, whether we purchase nice homes and cars, go on vacations that once had a culture, and simply pay our taxes. We support it and live it everyday. Some of us, more than others.

With this said, here is Chin's poem.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkkhWg3gBno

STACEYCCHin

Chin is speaking from the self-outward and goes beyond sexist and racist representations. She is speaking from her place of marginality to critique the broad privilege of capitalist consumerist society and the many shapes this dominant system manifests itself in (sexism, racism, transphobia, homophobia, heterosexism, xenophobia). She is using hip-hop as a tool to hold accountable the hetero-patriarchal ideology that perpetuates the system of domination. She is critiquing war, violence and oppression. Go Chin!

Blog Four - Ian Foster

| No Comments

I believe the crisis that will face the new generation of young people is having clean water for drinking and for other purposes. The population of the earth continues to rise, and I believe that within the next 40 years it will be a major issue facing people of every country across the world. Massive migrations due to lack of food or water will be imminent with wars fought for access to water. Also, I believe price gouging by those controlling the water will be a major issue. If the economic crisis of 2008 has taught us anything, it is that the world is precariously unstable. I believe that the boom bust cycle of economics happens every 30 to 40 years. I think that the next bust in the years 2040-2050 will be incredibly problematic. The last crisis was narrowly saved from being a complete collapse of the system. The world economic output in 40 years will be too complex to save with some fancy accounting and therefore I am fearful for the consequences of the next recession/depression. Water is going to be central to the problems. Here is a video of Jay-Z doing some water related things.

Issues of Global Youth

| 1 Comment

I think that the biggest issue that our youth face today is education disparity. Education is so important in our world, and I highly doubt that anyone would dispute that. It is the means by which we attain opportunities for success and advancement. However, our educational system is totally driven by social class. People from lower social classes have fewer opportunities and often receive a lower quality education than people from higher social classes. Tracking is one example of this. Schools place students onto tracks based on perceived ability and social class. College preparatory and vocational tracks are the only tracks that have any real value or benefit and these tracks are often filled by students from middle and upper class families. Even if a middle-class student has little perceived ability, their parents are able to utilize their cultural capital and advocate for their children to be placed in these higher tracks. Most of these students are the individuals who occupy the primary and upper secondary tier of the work world. They have access to benefits, opportunities for advancement, higher salaries and job security. Many of the students placed on lower tracks or come from lower class families have few job opportunities and many do not even graduate high school which significantly lowers their prospects for jobs. Race is also inherently connected to education because schools that primarily service areas occupied by minorities (who are often from lower classes) have less money and less access to resources such as computers, books, facilities and teachers. These schools often have teachers who are much less qualified than teachers who are employed in a middle-class white neighborhood. Our global education system perpetuates inequality among different races and classes and gives fewer opportunities to those who are not fortunate enough to be high on the income totem pole.

Blog #4

| 1 Comment

In my opinion, the biggest issue facing the new generation is racial inequality. Oppression of a certain group of people is the only way another group can survive or it is a way express the rejection of a foreign entity. synonymously to Darwinism. Having been the target of bullying, I know from experience that my race was a factor. I was one of the few Chinese people in a school of 1,000 and this foreign identity was not welcomed into the heavily Filipino, Samoan, Tongan and Mexican ethnicity school. I believe that society has become more diverse, however, what needs to be worked on is the accepting of others. What I have experienced is probably nothing compared to the hatred seen outside of the United States.

Many of my Muslim friends have dealt with racial discrimination for their usage of a hijab. What I believe society has come to believe is that the use of hijab is equivalent to being a terrorist and looked upon differently. Although what I've witnessed did not have any physical effect on anyone, the mental effect is just as detrimental and can lower a person's view on life. A song that I enjoy dealing with racism is Common and Will.I.Am.'s song I Have A Dream

Important issues facing Palestine

| No Comments

http://youtu.be/OgSVXjNLFgo or you tube: Palestine Hip-hop "Who's the terrorist"
It is my belief one of the most oppressed people living in the world are the Palestinians. They are living in a land that is there own yet is unsafe. They are not allowed to actually take up space in their land. Their right to exist culturally is constantly threatened. They face violence, harassment, and humiliation on a daily level. They are not allowed to speak Arabic without the threat of harassment. This issue is important because when there is not peace in one part of the world there is peace no where in the world. We are truly all in this together and this global struggle factors into my political world view, it weighs on my heart. I feel peace and justice go together and this cause deserves everyone's attention. Until there is justice for the Palestinian people.

Important issues facing Palestine

| 1 Comment

http://youtu.be/OgSVXjNLFgo or you tube: Palestine Hip-hop "Who's the terrorist"
It is my belief one of the most oppressed people living in the world are the Palestinians. They are living in a land that is there own yet is unsafe. They are not allowed to actually take up space in their land. Their right to exist culturally is constantly threatened. They face violence, harassment, and humiliation on a daily level. They are not allowed to speak Arabic without the threat of harassment. This issue is important because when there is not peace in one part of the world there is peace no where in the world. We are truly all in this together and this global struggle factors into my political world view, it weighs on my heart. I feel peace and justice go together and this cause deserves everyone's attention. Until there is justice for the Palestinian people.

Issues Affecting Global Youth

| No Comments

Youth all over the world experience a wide array of struggles-- and while some have it much worse than others, I believe that the overarching issue that applies to almost all of us is having our opinions, ideas and critiques be discredited, ignored, or even silenced. It is a sad reality that the bright, innovative and NEW ideas of youth across the world have rarely crossed the boundaries of the safe places in which they are shared, stomping out the confidence, hope and individuality of the youth. The mentality of our society has led us to discredit these ideas on the grounds that youth are naive, uneducated, inexperienced-- while in some cases this is relevant, it is often not the deeper issue at hand. Not only is this frustrating to us as youth, it is halting the rate at which our society is developing, and this is detrimental to society as a whole. The awesome part about hip hop is that it is a delivery method for these ideas, and thanks to the internet, it is hard to shut these voices out as they spread. I lived in Tanzania earlier this year, and saw the importance of hip hop to Tanzanian youth. They are oppressed by older and corrupted government members who ignore their ideas that would further their generation, and hip hop allows them to bump these ideas as loud as they can, sharing their frustrations and struggles. This video explains the relevance of the political hip hop in Tanzania.

Blog 4

| 1 Comment

I think a topic that effects the hip hop culture globally would be the use of the word 'bitch' in hip hop music and its effects on its listeners. In Lupe Fiasco's video 'bitch bad' he examines the effect this word can have by looking at the word through the lens of a young boy and a girl. In the boy's scenario, he heard is mother singing along to a song and calling herself a 'bad bitch'. In the case of the young girl she watched rap videos of male rapper using the word bitch to refer to the barely clothed woman that were dancing in front of them. Lupe's fiasco's followed these children into there adult life and showed how these images from there child hood effect their adult lives. The boy now a man associates the word bitch to the strong role model of his mother. The girl associates the term to the overly sexualized male fantasy that was depicted in the videos she watched a s a child and now influences the way she dresses. Lupe also mention that the girl may view the word bitch as an insult if 'bad' is not placed in front of it. Hip hop is rooted in oppositionality but the video creates a conversation for rappers and consumers to be aware of the effects that these images may have.

Pictures Worth A Lot of Words

| 1 Comment

Media is the most important issue facing up and coming global youth. Digital media has expanded exponentially since its introduction to popular culture. I know first and second graders who know how to upload videos to YouTube. The digital world gives us access to practically everything, and we consume digital media constantly. Running a search for a music video takes no time at all, or you could search for just a song, no video. This type of media provides an opportunity for great success, as seen by videos made and posted by political activists in Egypt. The digital world works in reverse, messages of hate can proliferate just as quickly. Personally, I believe the most problematic images and messages that will be spread are those relating to women; how they should look, what they should do, who they should be with, etc. Women have become hyper visible in hip hop, especially in music videos. They are objectified and given little agency, and images of women bent over wearing thong bikinis are readily available online for all who wish to see. Although digital media has the power to reverse this type of imagery, someone needs to utilize that potential. If youth cultures don't consciously work against they type of sexism seen in hip hop today, the cycle will continue.

I am a sucker for Atmosphere. I was listening to his albums on random, walking home from school, I heard some of the lyrics from this song and they made me blush. This type of dialogue should be open to artists all around the world.

Issues of Global Youth

| 1 Comment

In my opinion, one of the biggest issues facing global youth is apathy, complacency and a very individualistic and selfish attitude. I think the rugged individualism of the "American Dream" is something that has taken hold in much of today's youth, just as generations before us. The new attitude seems to be one of "if it doesn't affect me, it's not my problem." Unless a problem is affecting a person directly, there seems to be no obligation to step in and work for change. I think that any issues that need to be dealt with on a political level have become estranged to youth culture, as it has become estranged with politics as a whole. I think there is a large portion of youth culture that views systems of government, power and politics as too big and too flawed to dismantle or change, or simply doesn't think of them at all, and lives in total complacency.

I think another huge component of global youth culture is ignorance. For those that are not suffering to meet their basic needs, and have access to education, opportunity, etc., and are safely above the poverty line, and low-class economic status, can turn the other cheek and think that things are simply better than they are. I think that many youth see the entire world as a more progressive place than it necessarily is. I think of this in terms of racism. Many individuals, usually white, think that racism is a problem of the past, and that it's not something to worry about any longer. Obviously this is untrue and racism still runs rampant, despite going through the Civil Rights era 50 years ago. Many are unaware of how much privilege is still tied to race, or choose to ignore it. i also think there's a good portion of youth who simply choose not to think about things like racism because it makes them uncomfortable, or even guilty.

The song I chose to tie in with this is A Wake by Macklemore & Ryan Lewis. Macklemore captures the apathy of the modern times, and also hits hard about present day racism. Thiis song makes me appreciate him as an artist, because he's thinking about the collective, and real issues affecting the realities of plenty of people, but not necessarily him; a white, able-bodied, cisgendered man. He's displaying a better world view than the "not my problem" types, and caring about others.

Here's my favorite, and I believe the most powerful part of this song:

I grew up during Reaganomics
When Ice T was out there on his killing cops shit
Or Rodney King was getting beat on
And they let off every single officer
And Los Angeles went and lost it
Now every month there is a new Rodney on Youtube
It's just something our generation is used to
And neighbourhoods where you never see a news crew
Unless they're gentrifying, white people don't even cruise through
And my subconcious telling me stop it
This is an issue that you shouldn't get involved in
Don't even tweet, R.I.P Trayvon Martin
Don't wanna be that white dude, million man marchin'
Fighting for our freedom that my people stole
Don't wanna make all my white fans uncomfortable
But you don't even have a fuckin' song for radio
Why you out here talkin race, tryin' to save the fuckin' globe
Don't get involved with the causes in mind
White privilege, white guilt, at the same damn time
So we just party like it's nineteen ninty nine
Celebrate the ignorance while these kids keep dying


Issue Facing Young People

| 2 Comments

I think the main issue affecting young people is what there are "supposed" to look like, so in other words self image and self worth. I think self image is a main issue because many young people focus on there looks and what society will think of them and what they look like. People are always worried about styles and trends, whats in and whats not. Like in the song "Every Girl" by Young Money they talk about what a girl is supposed to look like. Which they describe as "I like a long haired thick red bone"which is basically describing what the man wants the women to look like and then the rest of the song talks about him wanting to have sex with this perfect woman that he just described. The next verse says, "Open up her legs then filet mignon that pussy I'ma get in and on that pussy, if she let me in I'ma own that pussy." I think this is a big issue because many women start to get the idea in their head that if they have sex with a man that they will like them and stay with them but in reality if he doesn't like the woman for who she is without sex he probably isn't going to like her with it. I also don't think this applies for just women. Men also think that they have to act the same way that the men in the music videos do. They think they need to be "playas" and not really care about anything but sex.

Same Love

| 1 Comment

When faced with this blog topic, many things came to mind. But first I wanted to choose a song that was contemporary and relevant to this topic. Also, I feel like it is a song that can be applied to the things that we have discussed this past semester. I think that there are many challenges new generations will have to face and overcome, but one of the biggest things that I find concerning is ignorance. In our highly technoloically driven era, it is so simple for young people to voice themselves (whether good or bad) through media outlets. From sending harmful text messages belittling a classmate to anonymously posting on the internet. By using these social networking platforms, a space is created where someone can voice their opinion without no immediate regret or repercussion becasue it is so far removed from physical emotional expression. I chose the song "Same Love" by Macklemore & Ryan Lewis ft. Mary Lambert because I feel like it is applicable to so many things we have talked about throughout the semester and to our current generation. Also, I cannot get enough of this song, so I wanted to find some way to connect it to the blog topic. Some of the most promient lyrics that stand out to me are :

If I was gay
"I would think hip-hop hates me
Have you read the YouTube comments lately?
"Man that's gay"
Gets dropped on the daily
We've become so numb to what we're sayin'

Our culture founded from oppression
Yet we don't have acceptance for 'em
Call each other faggots
Behind the keys of a message board
A word rooted in hate
Yet our genre still ignores it"

I really like these lyrics because it is very relevant to our technological generation, and if these practices of social media prevail and carry on in new generations, I can only imagine things will become more disconnected and more harsh. Also, I think that this artist does a really good job as a sort of advocate for the GLBT community, and humanity in general. But all together, I really like this song and I feel like it may be a good one to discuss in class.

Young: Issues of Today's Youth

| 2 Comments

As soon as I heard this topic I instantly thought of one song: "Young" by Hollywood Undead. While this rap-rock band usually sings about partying, drinking, doing drugs, and having sex, this song has meaning. It speaks of how the world has corrupted the youth, not that the youth has corrupted the world. It talks about how we have the heart, desire, and hope to change this world that we live in. It speaks of how we are forced to fall in line with societies desires of us despite the fact that we do not actually belong to those stereotypes. It urges the youth to feel the desire within them to break the mold with the rest of their generation.
The fact that they so willingly and openly speak of the fact that it's not the youth that has created these problems but the generation that has raised us really struck me. It shows that we are independent thinkers and the corrupt world that we live in has taken away the innocence that we were given at birth. It shows that we have the strength to fight for what we believe in despite what our culture, elders, and society tell us. This song makes me think that maybe we shouldn't be looking at this as a "what's wrong with our youth" issue but a "what's wrong with the culture our youth is born into" issue.

Ultimately, I think the shared global problem that youth is facing today is that we're blamed for the problems that culture, society, and previous generations have inevitably created for us to fix.

Apathy and Efficacy in Youth

| No Comments

I think that the biggest problem facing the global youth in the hip hop culture is apathy towards the government and a feeling of efficacy in government. A lot of the youth around the world do not really care about the government or the bureaucracy that governs them and many don't realize the impact that they could make if they realized their true political potentials. Efficacy, in terms of voting and politics, refers to the belief that one's vote will actually effect the election or have an impact on how a country or municipality is run. A lot of young people are disinterested in politics and have no desire to vote. This is such a sad thing, as the right to vote is not granted to everyone in every country and the global youth should take advantage of their rights and voice their opinion of how they think government should be run.

A good example of this in hip hop is the "Rock the Vote" movement. Rock the Vote is a non-partisan non-profit group whose mission is to "engage and build the political power of young people." Many hip hop artists and celebrities were part of this campaign to raise awareness for young people voting in the United States. Check out Mos Def's video below!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udwTkU1QKPc&list=FLa1pJdjFomt5759nCQd1gRQ&index=2&feature=plpp_video

Blog 4

| No Comments

I think the biggest problem facing the global youth culture today/the new generation is the materialistic attitudes of the youth. I think the youth today has lost any sense of imagination and creativity because they are constantly worried about what they have and don't have like the new iphone or ipad. Although these are great advances in technology and education the way this generations looks at them is for face value and almost just to say they are better than someone else their age because they have the money to obtain this item, or their parents do. Kids today are to reliant on money, their parents money, and too many parents today give them just that. When this generation has to face the real world they will not be ready for it. Although I'm not saying that all the youth today has this outlook, but it's sad to think that the ones who don't are the poor and broken because they had to be faced with the harsh reality at a younger age not because their parents didn't want to give them everything but because they simply couldn't. So these kids know the world better than the ones who "have everything" but won't be able to get anywhere with that knowledge because they don't have the money too and that is just something that is simply wrong with our society today. This materialistic society is always getting worse also, and seems to continue to keep starting at younger and younger ages. These kids are slowly losing their imagination and creativity because there's an app for that now. And because these things are constantly being pushed upon the youth through the media there is seemingly no way out now.

iphone5.jpg

Discrimination

| No Comments

I think the most important facing new generations of young people globally is discriminations. I know that discrimination got a lot better than before as people usually say; however, discrimination (racism) is still existed in this society.

Actually, racism comes to me without any difficulty as a theory itself, but it is not easy to understand for sure. In America, all people are equal in being legal no matter what race they are. However, it is not equal in the real state. Most people like to think of themselves as colorblind, and there are not that definite any more than before as like legal discrimination or slave system, but we can still see discrimination in small things. Although we are not discriminated directly, we can feel and say that there is still discrimination in this society. I believe that the discrimination is one of the main problems that new generations of young people should think about it carefully.

Can you imagine yourself as a young Asian girl or boy at an American school? You see a group of children playing "jump rope" and ask if you can play with them. You hope that they will invite you to join in, but instead they say, "Sorry no Chinks allowed." I heard that a lot of young Asian kids have been in the similar situations. (Seriously, I have many friends who had the similar experience when they were young) In general, people learn about racism when they are very young and they do not even know it because most of what they learn is from their parents. Therefore, I want to say that the discrimination and racism is the problem not only for young generation, but also for adults.

Although people who are born on earth many have different skin colors, they should not be discriminated.

Addressing Global Youth Issues

| 1 Comment

The question posed is one of a very general nature. As someone stated earlier, no two teens have the same lived experiences so it's difficult to find one overarching issue that all global youth face. However when thinking about global youth in the context of hip-hop, one theme that tends to emerge is one of where youth are reclaiming voices regardless of consequences. Hip-hop tends to be the genre or community where those fighting oppression have the opportunity to speak out against oppressors. Most notably in the Middle East and Northern Africa where many people have been silenced by their government use hip-hop as a medium to speak out. People are finding their voices in places where it is sometimes dangerous to do so. Thinking back to the article that disclosed how Tunisian artist El General was imprisoned for his music that directly addressed the Tunisian president and the current state of the country, one can find a story of a revolutionary. El General's song Rais Lebled sparked a revolution that wasn't too different than those happening in neighboring countries. Global youth was and is rising to the occasion of speaking their minds even if jail time is a possible outcome.

New generations, global issues

| 2 Comments

One of the most important issues facing new generations of young people globally is making sense of all the global messages and internalizing them. For example, when people from the United States hear about news/affairs in other countries, we take in the information but don't know how to process or internalize it so that it creates meaning in our own lives. This problem creates a sense of ignorance among these newer generations because they're solely focused on news and events that pertain only to their lives, they don't take in stories from other countries. They become narrow minded and one sided. I believe that the newer generations need to have a collective mind and engage in world news and global youth's stories so that there will be a greater understanding in the world and everyone can come together to face and solve issues.

The song "Stand Up For Love" by Destiny's Child highlights this theme of a collective mind and everyone uniting and learning about global affairs so as to change the world. They say, "it all starts right here and it starts right now. one person to stand up there and the rest will follow...If we all stand together this one time then no one will get left behind.
Stand up for life, stand up and sing, stand up for love." I believe that once one person begins to internalize and make meaning of global affairs, others will too. All it takes is a catalyst and collective thoughts and actions will result.


Blog #4

| 1 Comment

One issue that is facing youth globally today is competition. The generation of youth today has been raised to compete in every situation and only fend for themselves. This also causes them to be selfish which causes an individualistic society. Another issue with the youth being competitive is that it causes youth to expect to get a better job with a higher education and they are also pressured by their family to get a higher education. It is easier in wealthier countries for the youth to get a good education which in turn gets them a better paying job because that is all they have to work towards. In third-world countries, it is more difficult for the young to get a good education because they have other problems they have to deal with and cannot devote their time to school.
The song "The Show Goes On" by Lupe Fiasco is about youth who are from all different cultures and it is saying that no matter where you are from, you can succeed.

Blog #4

| 1 Comment

In my opinion the biggest issue facing the new generation is discrimination. There's no doubt that society has improved greatly on equality but, in my opinion, there's still a ways to go. I picked discrimination, because it is an issue I see the most in my daily life. Little instances like when you over hear people on a plane being more nervous because there's Muslim men on board, or more hesitant to walk alone at night when seeing an African American man walking alongside, compared to a Caucasian. The last example is one that has really affected me since high school, concerning the Somali population here in Minnesota. Attending Eden Prairie High School, we had two main demographics, Somalians and Caucasians. Somalians were thought of in many negative lights, for example, anytime something smelled in the restrooms it was always due to them washing their feet in the sinks, or if there was a fight mentioned it was due to Somalians. Even though I had never seen this action take place, and many of the Somalians I met were friendly, smart and super outgoing, the school as a whole never viewed them this way. Even at my boyfriends college, located in a heavy Somali populated area, people are constantly nagging about how they over run everything and should go back to their apartments. (people assume they make up most of the tenants in 'riverside plaza" which many nicknamed the 'crack stacks.') Although these types of examples do not include limiting any rights, and are just the thoughts of others, I do think that this type of thinking can really lower the person's quality of life, and therefore creates a major issue. Many of these thoughts are not kept just between the people saying them, but have a way of getting around so everyone knows. A song I really like that talks about loving and caring for all people is the Black Eyed Peas "where is the love."


Blog #4

| 2 Comments

I think one the most important issues facing new generations of young people globally is extreme individualism. Young people ignore each other more and more and only care about themselves. We see young people's rudeness and disrespect not only to each other among the young, but also to other generations including the elderly. Children don't care what others say and dislike when a teacher questions their words or deeds in school. They are not willing to follow the rules for the whole and interested in what's going on out of this country or their family. I am from South Korea where people share a collectivism culture. Even though many people value a sense of community, and think that a group is as much important as an individual, more and more young people ignore things that are not directly related to them. They don't care what's going on around them.
However, there is no such person as a complete individual. Some degree of collective consensus is needed for society to function well. No one who ignores the importance of a sense of community can be a good member of society who understands, communicates and interacts with each other well. The humans are designed to be social beings interacting with each other. Therefore, Young people need to understand and embrace differences in religion, race, and every other aspect of each other, rather than ignoring them and caring about only themselves.

In his song 'Changes', 2 Pac talks that we need to care about and share with each other, and erase racism.
"I got love for my brother but we can never go nowhere
Unless we share with each other
We gotta start makin' changes
Learn to see me as a brother instead of 2 distant strangers
And that's how it's supposed to be...
Let's change the way we eat
Let's change the way we live
And let's change the way we treat each other"

Blog 4

| 3 Comments

I believe an important issue facing young people globally is the idea of tolerance. Each group of people has difficulties with accepting something or someone that is different than what they believe to be "acceptable". The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of tolerance of others was the VOTE NO campaign this year for the election. Many youth are more accepting of a man who loves a man or a woman who loves a woman than older generations. It is a challenge for youth today to change the notions of what it tolerable and what is acceptable in our society. While it seems that youth in the U.S. are more accepting and tolerable of gays, they still display little acceptance of other groups of people who are different than themselves. The example that comes to mind is the treatment of Muslim women who choose to wear their hijabs. Although I believe youth are more understanding and accepting of the choice to wear the hijab, I do believe that the level of acceptance is still very low. American youth who do not understand why women choose to wear the hijab do not tolerate or accept the fact that it is happening. They still hold the idea of forcing ones own ideologies onto another. It is important for youth to see the gaps in what they tolerate and what they do not to create a better and improved society. It is not only the U.S. youth that need to change the notions of what is tolerable and acceptable. On the global level, the example that comes to mind is the acceptance of Palestinians in Israel. I did not know much about the conflict happening over seize, and the readings we have read in class have opened my eyes to the lack of acceptance of others. The youth in Israel have the power to change what will be acceptable or tolerable for future generations. It is important for youth globally to alter societal notions of what is tolerable. To do this, the lack of acceptance needs to be displayed for everyone to see in order for it to be realized how idiotic the rules of acceptance are. Since we have been talking a lot about the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis, the group that comes to mind is DAM. They express the lack of acceptance and the need for acceptance through their hip hop. It is important to have tolerance for and acceptance of others in order for everyone to have freedom.
The video I posted is a song by DAM called Change Tomorrow. I think it is fitting for this blog because it is about the need for change, and youth being a part of that change.

Problems

| No Comments

Although I believe this to be a contentious answer to this week's question, I think the biggest issue facing global youth today is apathy. Going along with some of those who have already blogged, propaganda and epistemological violence is not fully executed without the complacence of still formative youth. Many of us take for granted the fact that we encounter diverse peoples everyday, live in a "free" country, have an African-American president, and probably have a gay cousin. These things all contribute to us thinking that most people are happy, and they think the directions are societies are headed in are overall positive. Even being able to eat enough food everyday blinds us from seeing into the distance where there is poverty, starvation, eco-terrorism, nuclear war, capital punishment, etc. Although I think this "condition" reigns supreme in America, it must be global. For example, how many radical groups on campus are there today? In any other decade, youth mobilized themselves to protest things like the Vietnam War, the gas and oil crisis in the 70s, REAGAN, etc. Unless you have a relative who has fought in the Middle East, most of us don't know about Desert Storm or even what has been/was going on in Afghanistan and Iraq. Our global awareness is at an all time low and will be detrimental to the future, for we will make the same mistakes we have made in history.

I do not think that this apathy is pervasive; millions of youth who are not blinded by privilege fight for human and other rights everyday. American youths' awareness could be heightened if we were apt to create international relationships with other youth--but that probably sounds like too much work to us. Lastly, don't take me as a misanthrope: I think that apathy can and should be treated like a disease so that we can cure ourselves and be rewarded with new perspective and a global identity.

The-Price-Of-Apathy-Plato-Bumper-Sticker-(7090).jpg

An Impossible Question

| 2 Comments

"What is the most important issue facing new generations of young people globally?" is an impossible question to answer. The answer to this question has to be contextualized. Who is the youth you are talking about? Where do they live? Two teenagers who are the same age, in the same city, with similar backgrounds might not have the same answer to this question. That said, I think a lot of the answers to these questions could be placed under the category of structurally promoted epistemological violence. I carried many of the "rules" I learned as children about the ways the world works into adulthood. Some of these rules are harmless (like you take your shoes off when you enter someone's home) and others can be largely consequential. In the video I chose the poet talks about the ambiguous "they." I interpreted this as being society, i.e. the media, our friends, our parents, magazines, "science," etc. A child and even teenagers are not always capable of maintaing healthy skepticism when taking in new information (like watching the news or reading Cosmo). The poet talks about how science told her that it was impossible to orgasm and the difficulty she faced to learn, on her own terms, that this was false. In this video Huey is talking about the female orgasm but the category of myths that are forced on youth populations as fact is translatable to many things like health=thin, happiness=wealth, or that men are "naturally" better leaders. So much of what youth are fighting for these days is also about changing taboos and getting the previous generation to talk about issues that they would rather sweep under the rug- sex being one of the most scandalous such issues. Although I cannot pinpoint one specific issue that is the "most important" I would argue that the promotion of misinformation is the source of many of the issues plaguing youth globally.

Blog #4

| No Comments

The most important issue facing new generations is not knowing what is going on in their surroundings. The song Where is the Love? by the Black Eyed Peas is a good example of a situation in which the lyrics are intriguing to the listeners and make them open their eyes to outside situations.

Blog #4

| 1 Comment

What is the most important issue facing new generations of young people globally? Find a video clip that uses hip hop to tell the story.

I believe that the most important issue facing young people globally today is distinguishing between facts and propoganda. Our ability to communicate with each other globally has made huge advancements for human rights, has led to more educated populations, and has enlightened people about cultures, practices, and issues facing other countries. But, because the tools used for communication are difficult to regulate and monitor, namely the internet, the line between facts and propaganda and severely been blurred. Popular news channels in the US are known to be biased, and they often reshape stories to present the "side" that they associate with in a more positive light than the other. Sometimes information is simply left out to make their "side" of the story more favorable. However, this is nothing in comparison to the media propoganda being presented to citizens in other countries. For example, during our discussion on Palestine and Israel it was brought up that all of the television channels in Israel broadcast ONLY Israeli new and TV shows. This is an issue because any events unfolding in Palestinian areas are either completely disregarded or are shown in a manner to present the Palenstinians in a negative way. If there is coverage of an event concerning both Palestinians and Israelis, only the Israeli "side" of the story is presented. Palestinians are constantly exposed to Israeli propaganda, and this makes in nearly impossible for them to get actual facts.

I ablsolutely love this song by Dead Prez and I though it was very appropriate...

Though he is discussing propoganda in the US, much of what he says could resonate with the Palestinians. One excerpt that I really like is:

For your tv screen, is telling lies to your vision
Every channel got some brainwashed cop shit to watch
Running up in niggas cribs claiming that they heard shots.

I can imagine television in Israel presenting images just like these, though the "niggas" are Palestinians instead. I think it is so, so important to have a credible and reliable source of information on everything from politics to local, national, and global news, and since no one seems to want to regulate the information it is the responsibility of the global youth to decide what to believe and what to not.

Voicelessness

| 1 Comment

The most important issue facing new generations of young people globally is them becoming voiceless. In many different cultures, even in America, it is much too common for citizens to become voiceless and quiet about their beliefs and opinions. People are much more comfortable to remain silent rather than defy the cultural and social norms. If the new generation of young people were to defy this tradition and speak up against human inequities, their societies may become more unified. It is vital for all people, regardless of boundaries, to proudly have the right to advocate for human rights, starting with freedom of expression.

Here is the music video of Macklemore's "Same Love":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlVBg7_08n0
In this video, Macklemore uses hip hop as a movement for human rights. This video is extremely inspirational and opens the door for people of all ages and cultures to become comfortable with whom they are. This video was released before the election; needless to say it has had a substantial impact on American citizens.

'Hold Your Head Up'

| 2 Comments

One of the most important issues facing new generation of young people globally is that not all of them are standing up for their beliefs and using their voice to make a change. Although some are, but not a large enough percent are in order to see a change. Since the new generation has not been able to see a huge change, they have not been able to keep positive for certain things in their life. A song that truly displays a story of struggles through hip-hop is 'Hold Your Head Up,' by Macklemore. This song stands out to me because it depicts how he lost his girl and he's talking about how it's never the end of the road and still getting through a hard time of depression. Although this song is about losing a loved one, the song still holds very true to many individuals lives in general. Some of the lyrics that stood out to me the most out of his songs were as follows:

"Hold you head up, there's a light in the sky.
I know you're fed up, but you must try to survive.
Each moment's precious, don't let life pass you by-
Keep focused, keep your eyes on the prize."

These lyrics tell those listening that there is always something to look forward so you must keep your head up and stay focused. He goes on to say how life is precious and you can't let it get away.


The video clip below displays Macklemore's song, 'Hold Your Head Up,' telling the story of the difficult times in many individuals' lives.


| 1 Comment

In my opinion, the most important issue facing youth is peace and unity (or lack thereof). This stems from the innability to accept one another's differences. In lecture, Professor Isoke mentioned that she considers Rage Against the Machine hip-hop, and I do too. This is because they have lots of political messages in their songs and they fight for a better world. A lot of their songs refer to US Exceptionalism, the idea that America is far better than any other country, and that killing others is justified in the name of liberty. They challenge this idea and bring up the possibility that perhaps America makes mistakes. For example, in the song "Killing in the Name," there are these lyrics:

Those who died are justified, for wearing the badge, they're the chosen whites
You justify those that died by wearing the badge, they're the chosen whites
Those who died are justified, for wearing the badge, they're the chosen whites
You justify those that died by wearing the badge, they're the chosen whites

or in the song "Take the Power Back"

So called facts are fraud
They want us to allege and pledge
And bow down to their God
Lost the culture, the culture lost
Spun our minds and through time
Ignorance has taken over
Yo, we gotta take the power back!
Bam! Here's the plan
Motherfuck Uncle Sam
Step back, I know who I am
Raise up your ear, I'll drop the style and clear
It's the beats and the lyrics they fear
The rage is relentless
We need a movement with a quickness
You are the witness of change
And to counteract
We gotta take the power back

Blog 4

| No Comments

There are many issues in our global world that we are required to face on a daily basis. As a generation of youth it is imperative to challenge the systems that enable these oppressions to occur. I think that hip-hop is a really good platform for youth to speak out against these oppressions. It can be adapted to resonate within many different cultures yet still maintain the oppositional perspective that it originated from. Youth can expose the realities of their communities through hip-hop while educating others that do not have means of obtaining such awareness. I think the biggest issue preventing more youth from using this type of activism is the belief that they will not be able to make a difference. They believe they do not have the power to transform longstanding legislation, tradition, and culture. However, I believe with the advancements in technology their messages can reach many more audiences than ever before. It is time for the youth to come together to take over and fight for justice worldwide. I think Erykah Badu is an artist that is not afraid to challenge the injustices in our society. She talks about issues like poverty, urban violence, complacency, and cultural identity. This is a video of her song "Window Seat" where she shed her layers in Dealey Plaza where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. She did not care about what others were going to think of her public nudity and did something she believed in.


Blog #4

| 2 Comments

I think that the most important challenge that young people are going to face globally is connecting with each other and supporting each other's differences. As we have been learning in class over the past few weeks, there are different forms of hip hop all over the world. Although the hip hop movement may have started here in the United States, it's ideals and spirit have spread all over the globe. I think that it is going to be important to recognize all of these forms of hip hop and rather than judge them and scrutinize them on whether they are "authentically" hip hop or not. In class, we spoke about the idea of "connective marginality" which is basically a global phenomena where marginalized cultures feel connected to each other because of the fact that they are marginalized. In my opinion, the focus needs to be placed on what brings us together and not the differences that separate us. I think that even more so than now in the future, hip hop is going to be an important vehicle for change in our global society. As more young people are awakened to the injustices of their communities, their governments etc. hip hop will serve as a form of "consciousness raising", which is another term we talked about in class. Because hip hop gives people the means to relate to one another while expressing their own stories, I think that it's going to be imperative to stop judging each other and start focusing more on connecting to and helping each other rather than analyzing each other to determine if we are "authentic" enough to be considered hip hop. I think that the song "World Destruction" by Afrika Bambaataa is a good example of focusing on what connects us together and not what tears us apart, while also commenting on how the scale of these problems are more than just local, or national, they are global.

Changes

| 1 Comment

What is the most important issue facing new generations of young people globally? Find a video clip that uses hip hop to tell the story.

I think the most challenging issue facing new generations of young people globally is complacency, the inability to think for ourselves and mobilize necessary change. Our generation is one of entitlement, where many are used to having more than enough without effort. We are a generation that is reliant on our parents and grandparents who worked hard to provide the easy life we have today. Sometimes we think of this as just an American problem, but this is quickly becoming a global problem. Nations are all affected by this lazy, entitled attitude, both directly and indirectly.
I believe that if our generation continues this way, there will be much discord and many problems as we age. We will not be able to be self-sufficient and people will not be able to adjust to a new life where everything is not handed to them on a silver platter. We tend to be self-centered and money/success-driven, and the inner drive for these things will spur much violence, unrest and hate.
The most important issue facing young people globally is shown by the song "Changes" by Tupac Shakur. One set of lyrics from his song that highlights this is

"We gotta make a change...
It's time for us as a people to start makin' some changes.
Let's change the way we eat, let's change the way we live
and let's change the way we treat each other.
You see the old way wasn't working so it's on us to do
what we gotta do, to survive."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vL5sdu3pNrU

The Pink Hijab

| No Comments

For this blog I chose to write about the article we read, "The Pink Hijab." This article was very intriguing to me and brought about ideas and perspectives I had never considered were apart of Arab women's beliefs and feelings about wearing their hijabs. As a college student growing up in the United States my whole life I have clearly only heard the stereotypical views our society holds about these women and their culture.

Favorite Global Hip-Hop Artist

| No Comments

MIA is my favorite hip-hop artist although i don't know that much about her aside from her music. I did friend her on facebook and many of her posts were about political crisis that were in progress around the world. Her music is very informed and inspiring. She motivates people to stand up against systems of oppression and i value her work because of that. She makes direct connections to capitalism and how that negatively affects people. I admire her courage and creative knowledge. She is affective in motivating change on a global level because she shifts consiousness. She has shifted my world view.

International Hip Hop Artists

| No Comments


My favorite International hip hop artist is 2face Idibia. He is a popular nigerian musician who is also gaining international recognition for his work. His first single that received wide spread attention through out Nigeria was an R&B , smooth reggae ballad called 'African Queen". That was featured in the film 'Phatz Girl' which was released internationally. I really like this song because it was one of the first songs that i've heard that speaks of the African women positively from a black male perspective. I also liked the way he incorporated Nigerian culture in to the video and the lyrics. African Queen was released in 2004 and since then he has evolved and so has the content of his music. In the past few years he has become a prominent Philanthropist and activist who speaks out against the corruption in Nigeria. In 2010 he released one of my favorite songs of all time, 'Man Unkind'. In this song he brings to light the issue of fake and substandard food and drug products being sold in nigeria.

MC Sniper

| No Comments

Actually, my first exposure to Hip-Hop is Korean Hip-Hop because I grew up in South Korea. In Korea, there are also many Hip-hop artists, and I love listening Korean Hip-Hop songs. Among them, my favorite artist (non-U.S hip-hop artist) is MC sniper, who is a South Korean male rapper. He is considered a controversial and relatively influential musician in South Korea.

The song that I posted below is about the democratization movement and the political repression that South Korea had suffered during the 1960's-1980s. MC sniper is singing about the sacrifices and injustices suffered by his father's generation who built the economic powerhouse of today. Also this song makes people think about the overworked labors who got paid very little while working so hard under strenuous situations. The theme of Korean flag in the Music video reflects for those who died during those days.


Some part of its lyrics in English:

Brush, Brush, Green Brush
In this divided world where the severe wind blows and mother's tear pierces my heart,
For the true world & freedom in which people's spirit becomes the master,
I will row the river even though I may become black and blue watered like sagebrush.
Brush, brush, green brush, don't tremble by the early wind.
In the place where I am tied under the iron bars, I will see you while I am alive.

">

Buck 65

| 1 Comment

When it comes to my favorite artist outside of the United States context, I would have to pick a Canadian artist that identifies by the name of, Buck 65. Prior to taking this course, my knowledge of hip hop and the hop hop generation was not well versed and the hip hop artists that I latched onto were those that were affiliated with independent performers. Buck 65 is a Canadian artist that takes on a new style of hip hop, with a drone-y but rap infused lyric style, he creates collaborations within the indie genre. I really liked his work because he collaborated and did remixes with artists that I was already familiar with and it created this new appreciation for the genre because it was infused with something I was already pretty involved in. I would say that this artist was one of the first artists, outside of the US, that I knew and took account of. Many reviews consider his work to be a style of 'abstract hip hop' which I find to be really intriguing and interesting. I really took a liking for this artist because his lyrics were not subjective, but relevant to the happenings of everyday life.

One of his collaborations can be heard below :

Lady Sovereign

| 2 Comments

When I was in eighth grade, I was introduced to the magic of Lady Sovereign by MTV. Lady Sovereign is a rapper and grime artist from England. She really breaks the mold of a hip hop artist in a lot of ways, and she's anything but typical. The rap game in England is similar to the rap game in the United States in that it is dominated by men. As a woman, Lady Sovereign was under great scrutiny and often picked on for being a white female trying to rap. However, she didn't give up and has reached a decent level of fame, and has been able to spread her message of badassery across multiple ponds. Her lyrics mostly center around self-acceptance, which can be seen in her hit single "Love Me or Hate Me." This was the first song that I heard by Lady Sovereign, and the lyrics have stuck with me since I first heard it, particularly when she raps:

So I can't dance and I really can't sing.
I can only do one thing,
And that's be Lady Sovereign!
Love me or hate me, it's still an obsession.
Love me or hate me, that is the question.
If you love me then thank you!
If you hate me then fuck you!

These lyrics are certainly empowering, and spread a pretty positive message of being self-confident and being okay with yourself. Watch the video below, but you've been warned. This will get stuck in your head FOREVER.


Immortal Technique

| No Comments

My favorite non-US hip-hop artist and activist is Immortal Technique. He is from Peru but grew up in New York so he is intimately connected to immigrant communities and critical of US politics. I like his music because he is he incorporates his own experience in his music and makes intellectual arguments using everyday language. In his song "The Dominant Species" he raps:

I'm stuck inside the future and life is chaotic
The government is psychotically racist and robotic
The matrix of entrapment is socio-economic
Erotic conspiracy theory becomes reality
Life is war, and every day's a battle to me

His first album, Revolutionary Vol 1 sounds rough but that gives it a raw edge. It is clearly unproduced but that does not take away from the gravity of the lyrics. He is sometimes crude but to this he says:

I jerk off inside books and give life to words
Leaving concepts stuck together you probably never heard (what?)
I love when people think I'm psychologically disturbed
Cause it means I overloaded their neurological nerves

Despite the fact that he can be vulgar, it does not take away from the album's overall critique of a corrupt world. I especially appreciate his music because he does not say stuff for the sake of being inflammatory or getting popular attention. Instead his lyrics reflect reflective thoughts and deep critique of the racism, sexism, science, etc.

I enjoy this video because it shows a different side of him than his music does. In his songs and on stage he gets fired up, he cusses, he repeats himself, and he improvises so it's all very unpolished. This clip from an interview he did is sort of an unplugged version of him where is not performing but just speaking his mind.

Blog 3: Foreign Hip Hop

| No Comments

My experience with hip hop artists outside the U.S. is little to none. My experience with true hip hop artists IN the U.S. is small even. So my first thought for this prompt was simply to... yes... Google it. So I went forward to Google things such as "foreign hip hop" and "top foreign hip hop artists". This got me a few things but I found that YouTube was a much more helpful source for this blog assignment. Here with searching "foreign hip hop artists" I got a lot more hits. I listened to a few of the first artists that came up, inferring that they were the most popular, probably in English, and probably relate able to U.S. hip hop artists, making them relate able to the hip hop that I have been exposed to. One that particularly stood out to me was a group by the name of "Foreign Beggars". They are from the UK, produce hip hop and dubstep and only began in 2002. The first song I listened to was "Evil Dr. Hip Hop" which first drew my attention because of the fast speak in the first part of the song, which for my pleasure/experience was very Tech N9ne esque. This fast rap was highly impressive and that's when I knew I could listen to this more then just once. In continuing to listen to their songs I came upon one called "Whose Next" which again reminded my of an artist that I already listen to, Prof, made me like this music more and more. In this song in particular they use an almost Disney sounding, little girl running through a field with butterflies and birds, sounding tune in the beginning which carries through in the background of the song. But then raps and uses other beats over it to make it his own and raps about real stuff while this happy underlay is still prevalent in the background.
Now this is not to say that I only chose this group because they reminded me of artists I already like and listen to but that I truly respect and could see myself listening to this music in my spare time not just for an assignment. Which I have, through this assignment I have already downloaded one of his albums. This is another thing I love about this class is that although we only meet once a week I keep learning through the music, something that I enjoy and there's ALWAYS more out there which means there is always more for me to learn and that's what I love about this class and the blog.


FB!.jpg

K'naan

| 1 Comment

Refusing to bend to the will of market forces that demand participation in postmodern consumerism, K'naan's career has - for the most part - been dedicated to telling the story of the Somali diaspora in North America, and reminding the world of the plight of the civil war-ravaged, corruption- and famine-ridden failed state that is Somalia. K'naan immigrated to Canada as a refugee from the East African country, and rapping about his lived experiences as an inhabitant of the fringes of the third world, and the ghetto of the first world, rose to become an international icon.

K'naan is successful despite his blatant refusal to conform to anglophone aesthetic standards. He frequently uses Somali words in his songs, creating a dimension of inaccessibility, but also emphasizing the importance of the immigrant narrative to him as an artist.

Global Hip Hop Artist

| No Comments

Until I moved to Minneapolis to attend college, I was not very aware of the fact that hip hop has become a global genre and of the fact that artists use hip hop to express political and cultural issues. The hip hop music I was exposed to primarily consisted of the "popular" artists and tracks that tended to talk mostly about party life and bitches and hos. The first female artist I was largely exposed to was Dessa, and afterward I started to seek out other female artists. I visited Spain a couple of years ago, and I was exposed to the music of an artist named Mala Rodríguez (stage names include La Mala, La Mala María, or Mala Rodríguez). Her career started in the 90's, and she has been a very prominent and well known artist ever since.

Her music has been influenced by and encompasses a genre called flamenco music. Being a dancer and familiar with flamenco dance, I had been exposed to the genre of flamenco music, and this was one of the main reasons I was drawn to her in the first place. The second reason is the context of her lyrics and music. Her background and upbringing aren't so different of my own (middle class, single mother, living paycheck to paycheck), and the issues she discusses are sometimes synonymous with my own life situations. Some of these issues include poverty, racism, domestic violence, and female empowerment.

This is an excerpt of her song Prima:

en mis letras hablo de acción
de jamón, de polucción
de policía
de coraje
de chulería
de sangre caliente y de sangre fría
juntanto afino yo mi puntería
por abajo por arriba

Rough Translation:

in my lyrics, I speak of action
from ham, from pollution
from police
from courage
from cockiness
from hot blood and from cold blood
gathering refining my aim
through under, through above

All of these issues springing action are not just experienced in Spain but all over the world, and the fact that she writes lyrics on world issues and not just her own specific life experiences makes her a great example of a global hip hop artist.

Favorite Non U.S. Hip Hop Artist

| 2 Comments

Like I have stated before, Hip Hop is a new concept to me and I am just starting to learn about hip hop in the U.S. so I do not know much about artists from different countries. I started researching artists on Google and then I turned to Facebook because I remembered a friend of mine from London posted something about an artist from England. The artist that she had mentioned was Tulisa, so I started listening to some of her music. Tulisa started out as a singer in a British hip hop group called N-Dubz. The group N-Dubz had eight top forty hits on the UK Singles Chart. They recorded three albums as a group before splitting up so the members could work on their solo careers. Tulisa became a judge on The X Factor and Dappy recorded his solo album "No Regrets". The group has announced that they will be reforming in 2013.
My favorite song that I have listened to so far is "Playing With Fire" by N-Dubz featuring Mr Hudson. The song has some of the same beats as American music but there are also some British characteristics to it. I also like how you can hear their accents in this song, normally I am not able to distinguish it.

Global Hip-hop

| No Comments

I have never listened to much hip-hop outside of the U.S. (or inside the U.S. for that matter), but my favorite non-American hip-hop artist has always been M.I.A. The first time I heard her was when my sister went to Coachella four or five years ago and brought back an M.I.A. cd. I was never a very musically-inclined person, but it was one of the few cd's I listened to on a regular basis, and was one of only two hip-hop cd's I really enjoyed. I liked to message that M.I.A. brought out in her music, even though she would become fairly controversial once she gained popularity after her music was used in an ad for the movie Pineapple Express. Her music was also probably the first time I really appreciated the beats in a song rather than just the instruments, or the artist's voice. Although I don't think her latest cd was as good as her first two, I can't see myself liking any other international hip-hop artist as much as I like M.I.A.
MIA.jpg

Global Hip Hop

| No Comments

I lived in the Dominican Republic for a year between 2009-2010 and really enjoyed their music scene. Every year, the country celebrates Carnival for the entire month of February. It is supposed to a celebration of an upside-down world. Dancing, music and colorful costumes are a huge part of the festival and is where I first experienced the "dembow" style of music. Dembow is the Dominican take on hip hop and is how they refer to their street music. I wouldn't say that Dembow stays 100% true to hip hop; it is more of a mix of dance music, hip hop and reggaeton. It is probably the most popular form of music in the Dominican Republic and has even taken over mainstream radio. Doble T & El Crok are probably the most popular dembow duo and also my favorite. They are both young natives and their music is partially characterized by their adult themed lyrics. They speak in a very distinct dialect, one that is even difficult for some native Dominicans to understand. Their beats are great to dance to, and it's hard not to get into the music when you are completely submersed in it by the Dominican Culture. My favorite song by Doble T & El Crok is "Pepe Pepe." Dembow has slowly spread to parts of southern Florida, mainly due to the large amount of Dominicans in Miami and other southern coastal cities, but is no where near becoming a global phenomenon.

International Hip-Hop

| No Comments

When I read this prompt I was initially stumped. I've only been seriously listening to hip-hop for the past year or two, and within that time I've mostly listened to local or independent artists from around here, and a few farther away. I then remembered a song called "Enter the Ninja" by Die Antwoord that a friend of mine played for me over the summer. With the hook being sung in an extremely high falsetto, that sounds more like a girly baby voice, I thought the whole song was ridiculous and had to ask if it was "real." With that, I decided to look into them further for this blog.

Die Antwoord come from Capetown, South Africa which shows in their music that's done in English, Afrikaans and Xhosa. They are a part of the "Zef" counter-culture, which focuses on being "poor but fancy" and having style. The group consists of two amin members, Ninja and Yo-Landi Visser, and usually DJ Hi-Tek, who is more of a fantastical figure who has been represented as a number of different races and people, and is never clearly identified. The video I attached is of their sond Fatty Boom Boom from their most recent album, TEN$ION, that came out in 2012. I think this song is very hip hop. There's a hook, and flow, and a clear African Aesthetic in the beat and the drums. I also really appreciate the use of graffiti(which they also use in other videos) in this video to poke fun at American hip hop and pop music, using a mural that depicts a monster with the heads of popular American rappers and pop artists. There's also a very clear hit at Lady Gaga with the star of this video being an obvious lookalike. Yo-Landi, the female part of the group does hooks, and also raps herself, powerfully despite her baby voice. Die Antwoord is very, very different from anything I've listened to, but I believe that despite their air of ridiculousness they are worth taking seriously, and looking into further.


Global Hip Hop

| No Comments

The connection that I have with global hip hop is not necessarily embodied in the work of one artist, but rather in my experience with hip hop in an unfamiliar culture. Last spring, I lived in Tanzania (East Africa) for a little over 5 months, and it was during that time that I truly realized the extent that hip hop stretches across the globe. The following are a few examples of what I came to understand about global hip hop in a Tanzanian context:

- Within one of the first nights of being in Tanzania, my friends and I went to a night club/bar in the "town". Obviously I had no idea what to expect, as I had only been living in our small village for a few days, but as soon as I walked in I knew what was up. The DJ was bumping African hip-hop and everyone was into it-- and I mean into it. It was the most natural, flowing, up-beat dance I have ever seen by a group of people, and it was then that I realized that I was literally immersed in the culture that hip-hop was born out of. The "African aesthetic" that we refer to in a historical context was the only aesthetic in Tanzanian context, and this was evident in every way that they enjoyed experienced hip-hop.

- There was a TV station that was the old school MTV of Tanzania: they actually played music videos all the time. My host father would watch hip hop videos in our tiny house in our tiny village every morning, dancing along enthusiastically while he cooked breakfast. He would always point out his favorite songs to me, in broken English, reminding me that to him, this music was more about the music, rhythm and flow than the rap. Listening to traditional African music with him, it was easy to see how similar the styles were and how hip-hop was a genre that he naturally appreciated.

- As I became closer friends with a host brother of mine (he was 21 at the time), I realized how much he related to the lyrics of hip-hop music that I had previously associated with being so American. He had a handful of Tupac songs that he had acquired from friends on his computer, and he loved to play them any chance he got. If we were in the right mood, we would talk about the messages of the songs and then he would write his own poems about the injustices of his own country. As much as I appreciated Tupac before, seeing how someone across the world had such a strong connection to his songs enabled me to see the effect and potential that global hip hop has across the world.


Lady Sovereign!

| 3 Comments

My favorite non-US hip hop artist happens to be Lady Sovereign of England! She has an absolutely amazing story and blurs every hip hop stereotype you could imagine, other than her background. Sov is a small, white, young, gay, female MC from Wembly. One of three children she grew up in estate housing (public housing in the U.S.) and dropped out of high school at the age of 15 due to her attendance record. Sov is probably my favorite because despite the fact that she's tiny (5'1") she's got a lot of attitude to back it up. Her journey was difficult but in 2006 she was signed to Def Jam and released her first album "Public Warning" on the label. The spunk and courage Sov displayed while making a name for herself have really inspired me to do what I want to do, no matter what anyone else says. Her lyrics show just how different she is and her grungy style translates very effectively into hip hop. Though she is on hiatus now I feel as though we have not seen the last of the self proclaimed "baddest midget in the game".

Sov.jpg

Favorite Non US Hip Hop Artist

| 1 Comment

Starting this blog was really difficult, I'm not very knowledgable of American hip hop and to think of an INTERNATIONAL artist was sure a head scratcher! The only artist I could think of outside of the United States was Jay Chou. I was first introduced to him by my friend in high school, Jay Chou was incredibly popular in China at the time. Although I do no consider him to be complete "hip hop" he does do some rapping in this song:

What's great about Jay Chou is that he incorporates contemporary as well as traditional Chinese musical instruments and he also composes music with meanings that are prevalent in Chinese culture. Take the song posted above, in the song he is rapping/singing of listening to your mother because she knows best for your future, which is exactly what I was told as a kid and now I believe to be true! (Haha) I feel that most of Jay Chou's songs fall under the R&B category though, hip-hop has yet to captivate Chinese people, but I'm sure it's on its way!

Manu Chao

| 1 Comment

I do not listen to much American hip hop, and even less international hip hop. This is not to say I wouldn't enjoy listening to more, one of my favorite parts of this class is listening to new artists. I haven't taken the time to introduce myself to the non-U.S. hip hop genre yet. A non-U.S. artist I listen to is Manu Chao. He has a lot of work out there, but I was introduced to him by a friend when he was working with Radio Bemba Sound System. The group made music inspired by the street style of music through South America. Most of their songs are in Spanish, and I don't speak Spanish. But I appreciate his popularity is international and that he touches on political topics. He is certainly not hip hop as we have discussed in our class, but he is a beautiful international artist.

The song is called Clandestino, originally in Spanish ( I think), translated by Google.

I'm just going with my grief
Alone goes my sentence
Running is my destiny
To circumvent the law
Lost in the heart
Babylon the great
I say the clandestine
Not to take role

Pa a northern city
I went to work
I left my life
Between Ceuta and Gibraltar
I'm a line in the sea
Ghost in the city
My life is prohibited
Authority says
[Lyrics from: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/m/manu_chao/clandestino.html]
I'm just going with my grief
Alone goes my sentence
Running is my destiny
Not to take role
Lost in the heart
Babylon the great
I say the clandestine
I am the bankruptcy law

Black Hand clandestine
Peruvian clandestine
African clandestine
Marijuana Illegal

I'm just going with my grief
Alone goes my sentence
Running is my destiny
To circumvent the law
Lost in the heart
Babylon the great
I say the clandestine
Not to take role

Algerian clandestine
Nigerian clandestine
Bolivian clandestine
Manu Negra illegal

Non Us Hip Hop Artist

| 1 Comment

I didn't really know any artists that weren't from the U.S. until I started researching. I came across a few artists that really struck me and that I thought were interesting. I really enjoyed the lyrics they had along with the beats. My favorite though would have to be N-Dubz. I felt like they could portray a message and really get it across with the right beat and words. N-Dubz are a British hip hop group from London. They have had six top 40 hits on the UK Singles Chart. The most famous was "I Need You" which was charted at #5. One of my favorite songs that they have though is "Best Behaviour".


Emmanuel Jal

| 1 Comment

Emmanuel spent four years with the SPLA and by the time he was 8 years old he learned military strategy and weaponry and at the age of 9 he was taking part in major battles. Following the fall of Mongistu and the failure of Operation Jungle Storm, the 1991 SPLA assault on south Sudan's capital Juba, Emmanuel trekked for hundreds of miles to join a rival rebel group in his home area of Upper Nile. He hoped that he would at least be able to be nearer his home. Of the hundreds who set out, only a few survived the journey. Walking hundreds of miles across Sudan, many died of starvation, thirst and animal attacks and were forced to turn to cannibalism on the dead to survive. Emmanuel managed to survive on snails, birds and the vultures that one of his friends had shot. Despite different musical traditions, Ceasefire drew out the common links between the different Sudanese artists, and was followed by live tour dates. Emmanuel subsequently became the spokesperson for the Campaign to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers and performed in the winter of 2004 at a UN event in Switzerland to help create awareness for the plight of child soldiers. Today, he lives in an upmarket district of Nairobi andhas been nominated for an American Gospel Music Award (www.agmawards.com), and has appeared at Africa Calling at the Eden Project in Cornwall as part of Live 8. I am interested in Emmanuel Jal because of what he has been through in his life and how he portrays this in his music. It is interesting to listen to his music and know what he has been through. Emmanuel Jal.jpeg

Global Hip Hop

| 2 Comments

This question perplexed me as I must say I can't think of any global hip hop artists that I listen to regularly. I have read through some of the other posts and I will say I listened to M.I.A. on a road trip to Colorado the summer of 2008. This was mainly due to the fact that the owner of the car we were driving had her ipod already plugged in, and it was one of her favorite bands. I did enjoy the CD immensely and proceeded to download it after the trip. The songs Bamboo Banga and Jimmy were my two favorites. In fact listening to those songs now have immediately brought me back to Denver. I hope to explore other international artists. I will look at all the other posts that are not M.I.A. or Sean Paul based. Here is a video for your viewing.

Ms. Dynamite

| 2 Comments

I have next to zero knoweldge about global hip hop. Like many others from the class, I have heard of Sean Paul, M.I.A and other global artists that have made a name for themselves here in the United States. But I wanted to write on someone I hadn't heard of. I decided to google search female hip hop artists in the UK because I visitied London in 2005 and the music scene was so rich there that I knew someone would pop up. I stumbled upon a female hip hop artist named Ms. Dynamite. She is very well known throughout the UK and has won many Brit awards for her music. I sampled a number of her songs on YouTube and decided to post this one because it reminded me of Lauryn Hill's "Doo Wop."

This song is called " It Takes More." The tune is very reminiscent of 90's hip hop, though it is an early millennium song. I suggest that everyone look up the lyrics and take a listen.


Global Hip-Hop: Rap and Reggae Beats from Sean Paul

| 1 Comment

My Connection to Global Hip Hop

| 2 Comments

To be honest, I don't really know many global hip hop artists, I am still learning a lot about American hip hop! I would say I am most familiar with M.I.A, I first started listening to her music after the movie "Slumdog Millionaire" came out. I had heard of her before that, because I had a teacher who had her poster on the wall in his classroom and a few friends who liked her a lot as well. As many other people did, I saw the movie and heard the soundtrack and really liked it. M.I.A had a few songs on the soundtrack and after listening to those I was hooked. For a while, her albums were in pretty heavy rotation on my ipod. Aside from M.I.A, I really have no other connection to hip hop anywhere else in the world. Last week in class, my table brought up the quote from Osumare's article where he quotes the british rapper Kerosene, who talks about the idea that when Americans think of England, they think of the Queen and the royalty, tea and crumpets but not about the struggles and the realties of the people who are marginalized just like here in the United States. This prompted me to look up some hip hop artists in London and other places in the U.K. I found some artists such as Klashnekoff, Akala, and the Poisonous Poets. I also found the rapper Lowkey, who is also a political activist. His songs are very conscious and focus on the injustices of war, gentrification and racism. Lowkey.jpg

Marchelo

| 1 Comment

Fabri Fibra - The Hip-Hop Voice of Italy

| 2 Comments

When we were given this topic to blog about, I immediately realized that I knew very few international hip-hop artists. As I began my research, I started in Italy because of my general interest in that area. I discovered an artist called Fabri Fibra who I was immediately drawn to through his hardcore beats and Italian lyrics. I also discovered that he has a lot of the hip-hop elements we have been discussing in class that were easily recognizable. For example, his song "In Italia" describes the conditions that many marginalized Italian's endure. His hardcore, real and relatable lyrics brought to attention the side of Italy they don't show in tourist commercials. This song was extremely courageous to me, and I think the fact that Fabri could confront these issues and speak out makes him hip-hop.

75229d1315377757-fabri-fibra-fabri-fibra-image.jpg

Favorite Non U.S. Hip Hop Artist

| 1 Comment

Prior to writing this blog, I had not heard of any international hip hop artist other than M.I.A.. Although M.I.A. is somewhat talented and produces interesting and upbeat music, she would not be classified as an activist because she sings about getting high and making money. So, after doing some research, I came to conclusion that the Chilean hip hop artist Ana Tijoux is my favorite. Ana Tijoux not only is blessed with a beautiful voice and tone of which she sings, but she also is a female activist with inspirational lyrics. I took Spanish for five years, so I recognized some of the lyrics the first time I listened to them. She caught my attention because her music is so unlike the "stereotypical" Spanish music. She has soul combined with flow and upbeat tunes; needless to say, she possesses the authenticity female hip hop artists strive to achieve throughout their careers. From her Song "Sacar La Voz," her lyrics are as follows:

Liberarse de todo el pudor,
Tomar de las riendas,
No rendirse al opresor.
Caminar erguido, sin temor,
Respirar y sacar la voz

The translation, to the best of my ability, is:
Liberty from all the shame
Take the reins
No surrendering to the oppressor
Walking ? without fear/being afraid
Breathe and take your voice (speak up)

Ana has the capability to produce an authentic sound by combining hip hop with jazzy/soul-like tunes and create lyrics of which an activist would speak. Ana is an outspoken, unyielding activist who possesses authenticity of which others are envious. Ana Tijoux is my favorite international hip hip activist, and I will continue to vouch for her success.

Favorite Non-US Hip-Hop Artist

| 1 Comment

When our class was told to write about our "favorite non-US hip-hop artist," I automatically started thinking about all the artists which I am familiar with. I came to the conclusion that mine would have to be Patrick Chukwuemeka Okogwu, better known by his stage name, Tinie Tempah. Tinie Tempah is an English rapper, from the UK, whom released his first album in 2007. Tinie Tempah has been awarded with a total of two British number-one singles, and also won an award for Best British Breakthrough Act in 2011. Tinie Tempah is renowned for his bold musical choices, such as "Pass Out," which is also the first song I was ever introduced to of his. Tempah's songs attract me because of the beat he creates in his music. His beat is different from many others that I have heard. Although some of his lyrics may seem sort of "cheesy," to some individuals. I find them very intriguing and love how they go along with his beat. This song also attracts me because I can easily understand the lyrics which he is producing, along with his British accent, which you do not hear on an everyday basis.

Below you will find Tinie Tempahs music video "Pass Out," which I was first introduced to, to attract me to this non-US hip-hop artist.

Favorite non-US hip-hop artist

| No Comments

There are several non-us hip hop artists that I occasionally listen to but it was difficult for me to come up with a favorite. I would say M.I.A. used to be my favorite but I do not like her recent music as much as her older stuff. As of right now I would say Die Antwoord from South Africa is one of my favorite groups. I saw them in concert this summer and it was one of the most interesting shows I had ever been to. They produce very strange music and videos that incorporate elements of "zef culture" that the group refers to as poor but fancy. They perform their songs in Afrikaans, Xhosa, and English, representing the various languages in South Africa. They address a lot of social issues within their music and stay very true to themselves. They haven't (so far) sold out to mainstream society and continue to produce music that they want to instead of producing more generic music for more money. I have a lot of respect for Die Antwoord and really appreciate their different style of music and culture. Here is a video for one of their more popular songs, "Enter the Ninja"

Favorite non-US hip hop artist.

| No Comments

When asked to write this blog on my favorite non-US hip hop artist, I didn't have any idea on where to start, my roommate then pointed me in the direction of Wyclef. After some researching I immediately recalled one of his songs 'sweetest girl' ft. Akon, and Lil' Wayne and was sold.
Wyclef, originally named Nel Ust Wyclef Jean, was born in 1969 in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. At age nine his family packed up and moved to Brooklyn New York, only speaking Haitian French at the time he learned English by listening to american rap. Music then became Wyclef's chief interest and soon the group 'The Fugees' was formed, being signed by Columbia Records in 1993. A couple years later Wyclef then ventured on solo projects releasing three albums between 1997 and 2003.
I chose Wyclef not only based on his musical talents, but also because I found his life outside of music very interesting as well. For example, in August 2010 he made headlines when he announced that he would be running for presidency in Haiti, soon after, however, he was deemed ineligible. Wyclef is also a well known activist, he established an organization called 'Yele Haiti' which provided thousands of scholarships to children, donations to orphanages, street cleaning crews, hospitals and medical clinics, and organized food services to the people of Haiti after multiple natural catastrophes.

(Below are two of my favorite songs Wycelf was a part of.)

estelle

| 3 Comments

estelle-face-thumb-473xauto-8116.jpg

My formidable pre-teen years were spent imitating my older sister. This imitation centered around listening to the same music. While living in England, my sister urged me to listen to Estelle, a well known singer from London who was famous well before singers like Adele and Amy Winehouse incorporated their 60s sound. She made it big in the U.S. when she featured Kanye West in "American Boy", but has been around since the early 2000s.
The winner of World Music Awards, Grammys, and BET awards, Estelle is a strong female presence in hip-hop both overseas and stateside. She paved the way for hip-hop female artists and was one of the huge female singing sensations in the UK after the Spice Girls. As stated above, her style is now emulated by songstresses like Adele. But her strong, Black, female presence in hip-hop is not only felt in the burgeoning artist scene, but sets a standard for female performers in style, artistry, and skill.


Global Hip Hop Artist's

| No Comments

I do not know of a great variety of hip hop artists from the United States nor from other parts of the world. However, I do enjoy some artists from around the globe. MIA is an artist from England. Her style is alternative hip hop, pop and electronic. Besides music, MIA is involved in social issues and activism such as a refugee advocate and issues such as poverty, oppression and colonization. Another artist that I hardly consider hip hop is BLK JKS from South Africa. They are more of an alternative rock band. However their style and presence performing music I would consider hip hop since they are flow, and great energy. K'naan is a Somali Canadian hip hop artist. K'naan's style is poetry infused with rap and hip hop that is inspired by traditional Somali music. He is involved with social justice regarding the 2011 Eastern African Drought.

Here are a couple links to BLK JKS music videos on youtube. Would you guys consider this group hip hop?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p39dhBLK1U

Favorite Non-U.S artist:

| 2 Comments

I tend to gravitate towards artists who use music as a medium for political protest. When thinking of a non-U.S hip hop artist, I was somewhat grasping at straws as I am not well versed even on U.S based hip hop artists (before taking this class, of course!). But I then I remembered watching the World Cup two years ago and having the tournament's theme song, Waving Flag by K'naan, stuck in my head weeks after the matches ended. Described as "a sound that fuses Bob Marley, conscious American hip-hop, and brilliant protest poetry", K'naan uses hip-hop as a medium to "show the state of the world [and] if you call it like it is you're being political." He draws on his native Somali roots as well as Ethiopian culture to create his unique style.
Interestingly, K'naan states that he tries to avoid gangster rap clichés, as "all Somalis know that gangsterism isn't something to brag about." Since many U.S hip hop artists draw on the concept of being a thug or a gangsta to render oneself authentic, K'naan's position on authenticity is different.
Moving from Somalia to Canada at the age of 13, K'naan taught himself hip-hop without even knowing the English language yet. A spoken word piece on failed UN attempts to send aid to Somalia, jumpstarted his career as Senegalese singer Youssou N'Dour invited K'naan on tour. Since then, K'naan has collaborated with many popular U.S artists such as Mos Def, Dead Prez, and will.i.am.

Blog #3-Favorite Non-US Hip Hop Artist

| No Comments

My favorite non-us hip hop artist is Dynamic Duo. I like Korea
hip hop music not only because I grew up in Korea, but they have excellent hip hop elements, such as lyrics, flow and beat. Dynamic Duo is one of the most famous hip hop artists in Korea. In many of their songs, they mostly talk about people's suffering lives, isolation and loneliness in contemporary society, and criticize capitalism and individualism. Also love is their another main theme. The song "It's alright" talks about social issues like unemployment and suicide, hoping for people to care about others more. I like Dynamic Duo because they don't talk about self-praise, but they arouse people's attention about social issues in their music.

Dynamic Duo- It's alright

Dynamic Duo- Insomnia

Dynamic Duo- Rewritten Resume

Blog 3: favorite non-US hip hop artist

| No Comments

When I first read the prompt for this blog, I had no idea who to write about. I am horrible with the names of any artist or song, although I will recognize the song once it is played. The first non-US artist that comes to mind is MC Solaar, a french hip hop and rap artist. I was first introduced to MC Solaar in French class is high school, when we had our music Fridays. He is one of the most popular French hip hop artists, and is also one of the most influential French hip hop artist internationally. Although he was born in Senegal, his family moved to France to avoid the politics in Senegal. He became involved in hip hop by doing graffiti, and by participating in the hip hop music scene. He began his hip hop career in the early 90s, and is still making music today. In his early work, he would rap about the struggles of Black people who migrated to France. He has songs about his parents struggle with emigration to France. He also addresses the colonialism in Africa. He is not very well known in the United States, although he was a guest artist on a track of Missy Elliot. His music has been played on MTV, and in other American venues, making him one of the most successful French artists in the American hip hop community.

Here is a sample of what MC Solaar's music is like, with his first song Bouge de La meaning get out of my way, with the lyrics translated to English

Everything started in a city called Maison Alfort
When I see a weird mama which vibrates her body
She sais to me "MC solaar Come here so I give you some comforting"
I say "No thanx it's very nice but I don't eat porc"
move out (of my way)
I continue my trip arrive in Lyon train station
When I see a guy who boast he's very strong
like a lyon
He sais "Claude MC do you wanna boxe"
His hematoms were bigger than Samantha Fox's breasts
move out (of my way)
My floor neighbour, she's called Cassander
She's got a small dog she calls Alexander
She asks me "Claude MC do you wanna tyake him down"
I took my magnum, I have a hard time to get my shit down
move out (of my way)
Directly I went to Lucy's
Who loves dogs, cats and TV pet's shows
She says "Do you love beasts, you my super MC"
I said "Yeah, lov'em, with salt and well cooked"
move out (of my way)
Later in the metro there's a hobo hanging
he tells me his life, he tells me he comes from Rennes
Then he tells me that he sticks, that he should bathe
'tell him "Jump in the sewers, you'll land in the Seine (river)"
move out (of my way)
I continue my way, arrive at Boulevard Barbes
(Here I transposed to the equivalent in the US:)
when I see a mexican who came from mexico
(original: when I see a morrocan who came from marrakech)
He tells me "hombre, I'll buy your raps in pesetas"
(original: He tells me "arwhah, arwhah I'll buy your raps in dinars")
I said "no, I want some dollars 'cause they call me Solaar"
move out (of my way)
So i moved, I had to go, leave, turn around
I had to escape, to eclipse myself, I had to camouflage myself
I had to diseppear, to reappear
move out (of my way )

.

MIA

| No Comments

My favorite hip hop artist outside of the US is MIA. Not only does she have catchy songs, but these songs have political messages. For example, the popular song "Paper Planes" talks about the issue of immigration/border police and violence. MIA is of Tamil descent and has experienced war first hand. MIA speaks against violence in many of her songs and even in interviews. I find this very admirable because it brings awareness about violence to US citizens. Below are the Lyrics for "Paper Planes."

[x2]
I fly like paper, get high like planes
If you catch me at the border I got visas in my name
If you come around here, I make 'em all day
I get one down in a second if you wait

[x2]
Sometimes I think sitting on trains
Every stop I get to I'm clocking that game
Everyone's a winner, we're making our fame
Bona fide hustler making my name

[x4]
All I wanna do is (BANG BANG BANG BANG!)
And (KKKAAAA CHING!)
And take your money

[x2]
Pirate skulls and bones
Sticks and stones and weed and bombs
Running when we hit 'em
Lethal poison for the system

[x2]
No one on the corner has swagger like us
Hit me on my Burner prepaid wireless
We pack and deliver like UPS trucks
Already going hell just pumping that gas

[x4]
All I wanna do is (BANG BANG BANG BANG!)
And (KKKAAAA CHING!)
And take your money

M.I.A.
Third world democracy
Yeah, I got more records than the K.G.B.
So, uh, no funny business

Some some some I some I murder
Some I some I let go
Some some some I some I murder
Some I some I let go

[x4]
All I wanna do is (BANG BANG BANG BANG!)
And (KKKAAAA CHING!)
And take your money

Blog #3-Favorite Non-US Hip Hop Artist

| 1 Comment

This blog was very interesting for me to write. First off, I am not very well-versed in American hip hops artists. I can name off the well-known, mainstream types such as Dr Dre, Missy Elliot, Tupac, etc. But the hip hop genre is not exactly my forte, nor is any music genre.
Surprisingly, when I began to think about my favorite non-US hip hop artist, it was quite easy for me to come up with an answer. This past summer I spend a little over three weeks in the Philippines doing some nursing/healthcare volunteer work. I became very close to the Filipino people I was surrounded by and was touched by their culture closely in the few short weeks I was there. And let me tell you, the Filipino people sure love their music! It plays everywhere, all the time. Most of it has a sort of techno-beat to it, but they love anything with a good rhythm. The type of hip hop they perform is referred to as Pinoy Hip Hop. It is very fun to listen to and very catchy! So I must say, my favorite non-US hip hop artist has to be a Filipino artist. A few that I am familiar with are Andrew Espiritu (known as Andrew E) whose song "Sopistikado" was on his 2010 album that won Album of the Year, and also the artist Gloc-9 whose real name is Aristotle Pollisco who has won numerous awards. These two artists are fairly popular and well-known in the Philippines, so it was easy for me to become familiar with the names of each in the short time I was there. It was very interesting and enjoyable to be exposed to a different culture's hip hop music and to see how it influences the people in the Philippines.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from November 2012 listed from newest to oldest.

October 2012 is the previous archive.

December 2012 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Categories

Powered by Movable Type 4.31-en