December 2009 Archives

Short Stop Motion Animation

Using PhotoBooth and an owl cookie jar named Melrude I created a short stop motion animation. Melrude Music.mov

Photo 147.jpg


UMD Art Education

Digital Methods in Art Education is a class offered by the University of Minnesota Duluth that introduces art education students to various media techniques that may be later used in their careers. 

Here is the link to the class website: http://www.d.umn.edu/%7ejrock2/digitalart/ and the following description is from that site.

Digital Methods in Art Education introduces students to theoretical and practical experiences with emerging visual technologies. Art projects will use the computer as a creative tool and incorporate digital media in their process and delivery format. Projects may include digital photography, mixed media, illustration, animation, digital video and sound editing. This course provides a forum for the creation and testing of digital art instructional resources for children and youth. Participants will be required to develop lesson plans and make visits to educational sites as volunteer instructors. Digital Methods assignments will integrate contemporary pedagogical theories of visual culture and current standards for media arts literacy in art education.

Limited Computer Lab Lesson Plan

Christina Johnson, Fall 2009

Rauschenberg Inspired Collage

 

Grade Level/Age: 5th grader/10-11 years old

Time Needed: 3 Days

Focus:

Collage is an easy and fun method for students to explore in art making. The students will use collage to create imaginative works of art.

 

Objectives:

A.) 4.1.1.5.2. The student will describe how the principles of visual art such as repetition, pattern, emphasis, contrast and balance are used in the creation, presentation or response to visual artworks.

B.) 4.1.3.5.2. The student will describe how visual art communicates meaning.

C.) The student will have a better understanding of how to create a successful composition using various materials.

 

Motivational Resources:

Posters and postcards of collage focus on ones with a lot of contrast between background and subject, Collage books, Example by teacher or past student,

 

Art Materials:

Camera, computer, printer, paper, scissors, glue sticks, cardstock or construction paper in a variety of colors for cutting and for mounting in the end, magazine and newspaper scraps (all images much be age appropriate),

 

Introduction to the Lesson:

Traditionally collage is looked at as the gluing or pasting of multiple pieces of paper together and in fact comes from the French word "coller" meaning to paste or glue. Throughout history collage can be found from paper and fabric glued together by ancient Japanese calligraphers to Italian painters working with jewels and gilded paper in their works. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque are generally given credit for beginning collage in fine art as we know it today. These artists desired a more real form of painting and decided to incorporate objects and images that were from their day-to-day lives such as newspapers, hair, and old matchbooks among other things. This led to other artists using objects in three dimensional collage works. For example, Robert Rauschenberg created works that he called "combines" which are essentially three-dimensional collages, because they consist of a variety of objects acting as one piece.

 

Rauschenberg has worked with both two and three dimensional pieces. Some of his collages begin with newspaper backgrounds that are built up with paint and other scraps of paper. His paintings contain objects such as dirt, tissue paper, or gold leaf. Fabrics and other found items find their way into his compositions to make beautiful works of art.

 

 

 

Instructional Procedure for Art Making:

Day One: Today is an introductory day for the students. The first fifteen minutes will involve a presentation on the history of collage with a focus on Rauschenberg's work. Principles such as repetition, pattern, emphasis, contrast and balance will be pointed out and discussed during the presentation.  After that explain to the students that they will be working on a collage of their own but starting with their own picture. The picture will be digitally taken, printed off, and then they will be able to cut and paste  Then each child will have their photo taken individually and encourage them to be as creative as they want. While the children are taking turns getting their photo taken have the students who are waiting work on drawings of what they want their final portrait to look like. All of the pictures should be saved in the computer for day two. Allow five to ten minutes for the students to put away their drawings and clean up.

 

Day Two: Have the printed pictures ready to go for the students. The tables should be set up with scissors, glue sticks, construction paper, and other available collage materials. Instruct the students to cut their photos into any shapes they want and combine them with other paper to create a new self portrait. Re-emphasize the principles of visual art and encourage them to think about them while creating their portraits. The students should complete the project today. Allow ten minutes for clean up.

 

Day Three: This is the last day for this project. Each child will take out their portrait and a piece of paper. Allow five to ten minutes for them to write about what they learned about collage and the principles of art. Then have them hand in their work. The next project can be introduced.

 

Evaluation/Assessment:

The final project should be a collage portrait that displays the student's knowledge of the principles of art. Composition is important and it should be clear that over the course of the project they put thought into how the collage was arranged.

 

DBAE Checklist:

            Art History: Collage Art

            Art Production: Collage

Aesthetics: Learn to create original collage imagery

Art Criticism: Written paragraph

 

Bibliography:

 

"Collage History." <http://www.sunnyday.org/art_lesson_plans/collage_history.htm>.

 

Krieg, Susan. A brief history complied by Susan Krieg-Collage Artist.

         <http://www.kriegartstudio.com/nesting_cranes/susan_krieg_history_collage.htm>.

 

"Robert Rauschenberg-About the Artist." PBS.org.

<http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/robert-rauschenberg/about-the-artist/49/>.

 

 

Guggenheim Museum. "Robert Rauschenberg Biography"

<http://www.guggenheimcollection.org/site/artist_bio_133.html>.

Full Computer Lab Lesson Plan


Self-Portrait Collage in Photoshop

 

Grade Level/Age: 7th Grader/12-13 years old

Time Needed: 5 Days

Focus:

Photoshop can be used to create very expressive and original images. The students will explore and learn aspects of this program that will enable them to make a unique image. 

 

Objectives:

A.) 6.1.2.2.1. The student will demonstrate use of a variety of tools, materials and techniques in media arts based on the characteristics of the hardware and software.

B.) 6.1.1.5.2. The student will analyze how the principles of visual art, such as repetition, pattern, emphasis, contrast and balance are used in the creation, presentation of, or response to visual artworks.

C.) The student will have a better understanding of digital art and media techniques.

 

Motivational Resources:

Posters and postcards of collage or self-portraits that were designed digitally, books on Photoshop (beginners) and collage

 

Art Materials:

Paper, pencils, scanner, Mac computer, Photoshop, flash drive and disks for saving work, image bank (consisting of various textures and patterns prepared ahead of time)

 

Introduction to the Lesson:

Throughout history collage can be found from the paper and fabric glued together by ancient Japanese calligraphers to Italian painters working with jewels and gilded paper in their works. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque are generally given credit for beginning collage in fine art as we know it today. These artists desired a more real form of painting and decided to incorporate objects and images that were from their day-to-day lives such as newspapers, hair, and old matchbooks among other things. This led to other artists using objects in three dimensional collage works. For example, Robert Rauschenberg created works that he called "combines" which are essentially three-dimensional collages, because they consist of a variety of objects acting as one piece. Even though traditionally collage is looked at as the gluing or pasting of multiple pieces of paper together and in fact comes from the French word "coller" meaning to paste or glue, Rauschenberg looked at collage as the piecing together of other objects.

 

Collage is seen in both two and three dimensional work, but today a lot of it is seen in digital work. One of the basic tools used to create digital collage is the program Photoshop because it allows the user to work with various layers of imagery. This is not unlike traditional collage methods. Tools the students will focus on learning will be the move tool, brush, eyedropper, paint bucket, magic wand, rectangle, and zoom. Each one does something different. The move tool can move layers and other objects while the rectangle tool is used to create rectangles by default. Other shapes can be created besides rectangles, and the brush tool lets the user paint free form objects. The paint bucket is great for filling in spaces with color, and the eyedropper is used to pick up previously used shades and tones. When those blocks of color have been made the students will find that the magic wand will help them to easily select them in order to move them around for their collage. Zooming in and out of the image can also be a great tool to understand because it allows for the opportunity to have more precise lines and sharper images. Photoshop is a great program that offers a variety of options for creating imagery and once learned it opens up many possibilities.

           

Instructional Procedure for Art Making:

Day One: Today is an introductory day for the students, so the main focus will be on a Photoshop tutorial. First there will be a ten-minute presentation on the history of collage. This will include pictures of works by Picasso, Braque, and Rauschenberg. Then they will follow along at their own computers as we go over the main Photoshop tools we will be using: move, brush, eyedropper, paint bucket, magic wand, rectangle, and zoom. The images they will be working on for the day will be created as they follow along and experiment will the tools. If after the tutorial there is time have the students continue to become comfortable with the tools. Explain that for the next class period they will be working on a self-portrait collage and they should come prepared with ideas.

 

Day Two: This is a student work day. Have Photoshop open on all computers and make sure that before they arrive all motivational resources are made available or on display. Also have the image bank pulled up on each computer. Explain that if they would like to begin with a hand drawing or outline that there are paper and pencils available and the images can be scanned in. All scanning should be done today so the students have all of next class period to work in Photoshop. Allow ten minutes to fifteen minutes for saving work to a class flash drive.

 

Day Three: Again, have the classroom set up like the previous day for the students before they arrive. Today is a work day. Allow ten minutes to fifteen minutes for saving work to a class flash drive.

 

            Day Four: Follow day three procedure.

 

Day Five: Today is the final day of the project. Each student will pull up their own work on their computer and then the class will get a chance to walk around and see each other's work. Then when they have finished with that have them take out a piece of paper and write down what they learned about collage and Photoshop through doing this project. After they have finished go around the room and have each person share one thing that they've learned with the class. Make sure all work is saved to the flash drive and to collect all the papers. 

 

 

 

Evaluation/Assessment:

The students will be creating collaged images using Photoshop to create self portraits so the final image should appear to be a portrait. While creating the images they should use a variety of Photoshop tools as well as relevant hardware used such as scanners. The students should also display knowledge of the principles of visual art within their own work and within the written critique of their work. They will also share one thing they learned about Photoshop with the class. Over the few days of the project the student should show a good amount of effort put into the assignment.

 

DBAE Checklist:

            Art History: Media and Collage Art

            Art Production:  Collage (in Photoshop)

Aesthetics: Learn to create original collage imagery using Photoshop tools

Art Criticism: Written paragraph

 

Bibliography:

 

"Collage History." <http://www.sunnyday.org/art_lesson_plans/collage_history.htm>.

 

Krieg, Susan. A brief history complied by Susan Krieg-Collage Artist.

         <http://www.kriegartstudio.com/nesting_cranes/susan_krieg_history_collage.htm>.

 

"Robert Rauschenberg-About the Artist." PBS.org.

<http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/robert-rauschenberg/about-the-artist/49/>.

 

WordPress. Tommy Maloney. "Photoshop Tool Basics." Photoshop Lab. Posting.

<http://www.photoshoplab.com/Photoshop-Tool-Basics.html>.

 

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