March 12, 2008

Inanimate Alice


Here's a terrific example of Media Arts ( digital narrative project) , complete with
teaching resources!

http://www.inanimatealice.com/

'Inanimate Alice' tells the story of Alice, a young girl growing up in the
first half of the 21st century, and her imaginary digital friend, Brad.
Over ten episodes, each a self contained story, we see Alice grow from an eight
year old living with her parents in a remote region of Northern China to a talented
mid-twenties animator and designer with the biggest games company in the world.

January 12, 2008

Discussing Media Literacy

Media literacy can include discussion of how media influences our perception of beauty and gender identity...

Dove Commercial
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hibyAJOSW8U&feature=related


Morphing Art History
Video that morphs faces of women throughout European art history:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUDIoN-_Hxs

More Lesson Ideas > Media Arts

Please Post your ideas for media art lessons to comments below...

In this multi-media art lesson, students begin by looking at a hand painted scroll dating from the Japanese Edo period (1615-1868). ... starts with traditonal art into digital art...
www.thirteen.org/edonline/lessons/scrolls/index.html

Minnesota / National History Day Program
http://www.mnhs.org/school/historyday/program/programinfo.htm

National History Day / Media Projects
http://www.nhd.org/Documentary.htm
Documentary Category Examples

Senior Division Group Documentary Example:"Theodore Roosevelt: Conserving America's Future" This documentary was produced by Mitch Paine, Evan Wilson and Richard Carlson from Lincoln, Nebraska and won the NHD gold medal in 2006.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCxf9eYWiaM

http://www.nhd.org/LessonPlans.htm
http://www.mnhs.org/school/historyday/index.htm


Some links from Jen Dietrich:

Postmodern and contemporary lesson plans:
<http://www.pbs.org/art21/>

Spiral Workshop
http://www.uic.edu/classes/ad/ad382/sites/SpiralWorkshop/SW_index.html

Media Arts / Books

Paul, Christiane. Digital Art (World of Art). New York: Thames & Hudson, 2003.
ISBN: 0500203679 (high school /some adult content)

Digital Illustration: A Masterclass in Creative Image-making
by Lawrence Zeegen, RotoVision ISBN: 2880467977 (high school /some adult content)

Art of the Digital Age by Bruce Wands, Thames & Hudson; Reprint edition (July 2, 2007)
ISBN-10: 0500286299

From Word to Image: Storyboarding and the Filmmaking Process [ILLUSTRATED]
by Marcie Begleiter, Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions, ISBN-10: 0941188280

Freedman, Kerry. Teaching Visual Culture. New York: teacher's College Press, 2003.

Szekely, George and Ilona. Video Art for the Classroom. Reston, VA: NAEA Press, 2005.

Meadows, Mark S. Pause & Effect: The Art of Interactive Narrative. Indianapolis,: New Riders Press, 2003.

Greene,Rachel. Internet Art (World of Art) Thames & Hudson, 2004. ISBN: 0500203768

Manovich, Lev (2001). The Language of New Media Cambridge, Masschusetts: The MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-63255-1

Software Resources

First off, I always encourage people to actively use the HELP menu that is built into the software they are using. Software updates so frequently, including baffling changes in the location of tools and procedures. Using the help that comes with the version of software you are using is the best way to assure you are getting the correct info. Do the built in tutorials + click through the HELP topics before you seek info elsewhere.

( And Please post your own links to software resources to the comments at the bottom! )

There are tons of resources + tutorials on the web. Here are some good places to start:

iLife How-to Guides (iMovie, iPhoto, iTunes)
http://education.apple.com/education/ilife/howto/

And for more in-depth learning, you can subscribe to
Apple Professional Development Online

Apple Software Support
http://www.apple.com/support/software/

Apple iMovie Tutorials
http://www.apple.com/support/imovie/tutorial/

Atomic Learning Tutorials
iMovie HD 6
http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/imovie_hd_6

Garageband
http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/garageband3_wn

photoshop elements
http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/photoshop_elements_4_mac

Photoshop CS3 Extended
http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/pscs3xt_intromac

DIGITAL NARRATIVE Process Overview

DIGITAL NARRATIVE > Media Art Lesson
by Joellyn Rock
Folk and fairy tales provide a rich starting point for a digital media project. Passed down from oral storytellers through literary traditions to new media, they are always altered by retelling to reflect the needs of the storyteller and the aesthetics of the time. Because the story is so well known, it can be altered significantly and still remain resonant and recognizable to the contemporary audience.

Step 1 > CHOOSE A TALE
Select a well-know folk tale or myth to retell using contemporary media. When choosing a story to translate into time and motion media, look for clear characters, action and settings. A story that involves transformation or metamorphosis can work well for animation. Dramatic characters and conflicts make for fun play-acting in video projects.

Step 2 > SEQUENCING
Break the story down into scenes that include specific characters engaged in key actions and settings. Identify all the characters, settings, props and dramatic moments in the storyline. Notice the arc of the story and the emotional mood of each scene. If you plan to create a very short work, simplify the narrative into as few words possible.

Step 3 > DEFINE UNITY
Define the ways that you will create visual unity throughout this media artwork. Choose a limited color palette for use on your project. Using line, texture, shape and color in a consistant style thoughout the piece will help create unity, even when a team of artists contributes to the whole. Identifying these stylistic elements is important in both individual and group projects. Visual qualities of characters and places need to be rendered in a consistant style for continuity.

Step 4 > CREATE SURPRISE
Explore the ways that you will create surprise within your unified project by storyboarding the scenes. Scale shifts, unusual shot angles, and dynamic motion can make your work come alive. Sketch out the key moments in the story, blocking in areas of dark and light, positive and negative space. When storyboarding a scene, consider a variety of compositional strategies. Avoid plunking the character in the middle of the frame. Experiement with asymmetrical composition, dramatic angles, perspective, close ups, mid-range, and overview shots in different scenes.

Step 5 > DIVIDING TASKS
Break down tasks for a team project, either one person per scene or one person per creative job. Assign a team leader, and/or designate portions of work to specific artists who have skills in those areas. Some love creating background art, others may enjoy character design, while another may excel with music and sound effects. Video projects may require a cast of actors and a director, camera crew, lighting, costume and prop makers. Animation is enhanced with narration and other voice work and sound effects. Make sure everyone knows their job and has time to prepare for it.

Step 6 > PRODUCTION
By doing the planning above, production should follow along more smoothly. Media projects can be notoriously time consuming. Keeping the story length very short from the start will help keep this in check. The team leader needs to keep track of progress on various scenes, checking that the elements that create unity and surprise are working across the board. Saving digital work frequently, naming and backing up files in a systematic way, will prevent the nightmare of lost hours of work!

Step 7 > EDITING

Editing down the video and sound can be the most labor intensive of all. Editing is also a very creative task, requiring a grasp of how all the pieces can come together as a whole. Editors make tough choices, cutting out pieces that run too long or too slow. The editor can use a fast rhythm to create emotional tension or slow-motion timing to give a scene a dreamlike quality. Guide your students to be selective when applying special effects and transitions to a project. These effects should fit with the stylistic unity of the work, when overused they can make the work very amaturish.


Continue reading "DIGITAL NARRATIVE Process Overview" »

Comments / Cloquet Workshop

Whew!

It was probably too much to cover in a day, but I hope each person got something out of it that they can take back into their own teaching. We ran out of time for a full blown brainstorm session. Perhaps we can use this blog to gather questions and more ideas about media arts integration into K-12 education. I will be posting more resources that apply to the project we did, and links to more info on media arts.

Thanks for your participation!

Please post your comments about the workshop below:

January 10, 2008

Joellyn Rock > Media Art Projects

Joellyn Rock > Student Works + Projects

Joellyn Rock Homepage

Joellyn Rock Portfolio

Metamorphosis of Peace Project
(Collaboration with Alison Aune)

Tulip & Arabesque Project
(Collaboration with Alison Aune)

Dijital Pasaj

Digital Carpets
see also: Digital Carpets in Motion

Tattoo U

Bio-Collage
(Digital Self Portraits)

Animated Self Portraits
http://www.d.umn.edu/~jrock2/digstudio

Digital Art Camp

Gitchee Gloomy Monster Podcasts

More Digital Art Camp Projects (viewable on dvd)
If I were in a Rock and Roll Band
Dream Movies
Magic carpet Movies
Dance Machines

4th Street Art Club > Wild Thing

Digital Narratives
The Vasalisa Project
Greek Myths
Fairy Tales


Jack and the Beanstalk > Background

Jack and the Beanstalk > BACKGROUND

Folk and fairy tales provide a rich starting point for a digital media project. Passed down from oral storytellers through literary traditions to new media, they are always altered by retelling to reflect the needs of the teller and the aesthetics of the time. Because the story is so well known, it can be altered significantly and still remain resonant and recognizable to the contemporary audience.

For more versions of the tale and the history of this folktale go to:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_and_the_Beanstalk
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/jackbeanstalk/other.html

MORE Versions of Jack and the Beanstalk
3 versions of an English fairy tale edited by D. L. Ashliman
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0328jack.html
SurLaLune ( annotated version on web)
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/jackbeanstalk/index.html

Books + References
Joseph Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk", English Fairy Tales
Jacob and Wilheim Grimm, Grimm's Fairy Tales, "The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs"
Lang, Andrew, ed. "Jack and the Beanstalk." The Red Fairy Book. New York: Dover, 1965
Opie, Iona and Peter. The Classic Fairy Tales. New York: Oxford University Press, 1974
Tatar, Maria M. The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales. New York: W. W. Norton, 2002.
Zipes, Jack, ed. When Dreams Come True. London: Routledge, 1998.
Zipes, Jack, ed. The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales. Oxford: Oxford University, 2000.

Other contemporary versions:
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/jackbeanstalk/themes.html
Dahl, Roald. "Jack and the Beanstalk." Revolting Rhymes. New York: Puffin Books, 1982.
Buckley, Michael. The Sisters Grimm: The Fairy Tale Detectives. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2005

Film + Animation Versions
Jack and the Beanstalk (1922). Walt Disney, director.
Jack and the Beanstalk (1931). Dave Fleischer, director. (Betty Boop).
Jack-Wabbit and the Beanstalk (1942). Friz Freleng, director (World War II Bugs Bunny)
Mickey and the Beanstalk in Fun and Fancy Free (1947). Walt Disney, producer
Woody, the Giant Killer (1947). Dick Lundy, director (Woody Woodpecker)
Let's Stalk Spinach (1951). Seymour Kneitel, director. (Popeye)
Jack and the Beanstalk (1952). Jean Yarbrough, director. (Abbott and Costello)
Jack and the Beanstalk (1955). Lotte Reiniger, director. UK. (shadow puppets)
Beanstalk Bunny (1955). Chuck Jones, director. (Bugs Bunny)
Tweety and the Beanstalk (1957). Friz Freleng, director. (Tweety)
USA Title: Jack and the Beanstalk. (1967). Gisaburo Sugii, director. Japan. (Japanese Anime)
Shelley Duvall's Faerie Tale Theatre: Jack and the Beanstalk (1983) (TV).
The 10th Kingdom (2000) (TV). David Carson and Herbert Wise, directors.
Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story (2001), directed by Brian Henson.


Other Media:
In the Magic School Bus TV episode "Gets Planted", the class put on a school production of Jack and the Beanstalk, Phoebe starring as the beanstalk after Ms. Frizzle turned her into a bean plant.

Spyro: Year of The Dragon ( E rated game) "Jack and the Beanstalk" on the level "Charmed Ridge".
In the Crash Tag Team Racing ( E-10+ rated game), a track is named " Track and the Beanstalk ".
An episode of The Super Mario Bros. Super Show, cartoon titled "Mario and the Beanstalk".

Stephen Sondheim's musical Into the Woods features Jack along with several other fairy-tale characters. In the second half of the musical, the Giant's Wife climbs down the stalk to exact revenge for her husband's death, furious at Jack's betrayal of her hospitality. She is eventually killed as well.

Jack and the Beanstalk > Lesson / Plot

DIGITAL NARRATIVE > Media Art Lesson
Folk and fairy tales provide a rich starting point for a digital media project. Passed down from oral storytellers through literary traditions to new media, they are always altered by retelling to reflect the needs of the storyteller and the aesthetics of the time. Because the story is so well known, it can be altered significantly and still remain resonant and recognizable to the contemporary audience.

Step 1 > CHOOSE A TALE
Select a well-know folk tale or myth to retell using contemporary media. When choosing a story to translate into time and motion media, look for clear characters, action and settings. A story that involves transformation or metamorphosis can work well for animation. Dramatic characters and conflicts make for fun play-acting in video projects.

Step 2 > SEQUENCING
Break the story down into scenes that include specific characters engaged in key actions and settings. Identify all the characters, settings, props and dramatic moments in the storyline. Notice the arc of the story and the emotional mood of each scene. If you plan to create a very short work, simplify the narrative into as few words possible.

Step 3 > DEFINE UNITY
Define the ways that you will create visual unity throughout this media artwork. Choose a limited color palette for use on your project. Using line, texture, shape and color in a consistant style thoughout the piece will help create unity, even when a team of artists contributes to the whole. Identifying these stylistic elements is important in both individual and group projects. Visual qualities of characters and places need to be rendered in a consistant style for continuity.

Step 4 > CREATE SURPRISE
Explore the ways that you will create surprise within your unified project by storyboarding the scenes. Scale shifts, unusual shot angles, and dynamic motion can make your work come alive. Sketch out the key moments in the story, blocking in areas of dark and light, positive and negative space. When storyboarding a scene, consider a variety of compositional strategies. Avoid plunking the character in the middle of the frame. Experiement with asymmetrical composition, dramatic angles, perspective, close ups, mid-range, and overview shots in different scenes.

Step 5 > DIVIDING TASKS
Break down tasks for a team project, either one person per scene or one person per creative job. Assign a team leader, and/or designate portions of work to specific artists who have skills in those areas. Some love creating background art, others may enjoy character design, while another may excel with music and sound effects. Video projects may require a cast of actors and a director, camera crew, lighting, costume and prop makers. Animation is enhanced with narration and other voice work and sound effects. Make sure everyone knows their job and has time to prepare for it.

Step 6 > PRODUCTION
By doing the planning above, production should follow along more smoothly. Media projects can be notoriously time consuming. Keeping the story length very short from the start will help keep this in check. The team leader needs to keep track of progress on various scenes, checking that the elements that create unity and surprise are working across the board. Saving digital work frequently, naming and backing up files in a systematic way, will prevent the nightmare of lost hours of work!


Step 7 > EDITING

Editing down the video and sound can be the most labor intensive of all. Editing is also a very creative task, requiring a grasp of how all the pieces can come together as a whole. Editors make tough choices, cutting out pieces that run too long or too slow. The editor can use a fast rhythm to create emotional tension or slow-motion timing to give a scene a dreamlike quality. Guide your students to be selective when applying special effects and transitions to a project. These effects should fit with the stylistic unity of the work, when overused they can make the work very amaturish.


A simple plot we will be using as the starting point for our Digital Narrative Project:

Plot Summary: Jack and the Beanstalk

1.
Jack was a very poor boy whose lack of common sense often drove his widowed mother to despair. One day she sent him to the market to sell their last and only possession, a cow.

2.
But along the way, Jack met a stranger who offered to trade it for five "magic beans." Thrilled at the prospect of owning magic beans, Jack made the deal without hesitation.

3.
Alas, his mother turned out to be less than thrilled when he arrived back home. She threw the beans straight out of the window and sent Jack to bed without dinner.

4.
Overnight however, the seeds grew into a gigantic beanstalk. It reached so far into the heavens, the top went completely out of sight.

5.
Eager as the young boy was, Jack immediately decided to climb the plant and arrived in a land high up in the clouds, the home of the giant.

6.
When he broke into the giant's castle, the giant quickly sensed a human was near:

Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum!
I smell the blood of an Englishmun.
Be he 'live, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.

7.
However, Jack was saved by the giant's wife and as he escaped from the palace, he took some gold coins with him. Back home, the boy and his mother celebrated their newfound fortune.

8.
But their luck did not last, and Jack climbed the beanstalk once more. This time he stole a hen which laid golden eggs. Again he was saved by the giant's wife.
He went down the ladder and showed the hen to his mother, and the two lived happily on the proceedings from the hen's eggs.

9.
Eventually, Jack grew bored and resolved to climb the beanstalk a third time. This time, he stole a magical harp that played by itself. The instrument did not appreciate being stolen and called out to the giant for help.

10.
The giant chased Jack down the beanstalk, but luckily the boy got to the ground before the giant did. Jack immediately chopped it down with an axe. The giant fell to earth, hitting the ground so hard that it split, pulling the beanstalk down with him.

Cloquet Teachers / 2 Groups

Cloquet Teachers

GROUP 1: (10 teachers / K - 12)

Washington Elementary School
Mentor: Becky Hansen
Mentees:
Kim Peddle - Grade 3
Laura Lyness - Grade 2

Churchill Elementary School
Mentor: Andrea Cacek
Mentees:
Jess Gagne - Grade 4
Jen Owens - Grade 5

Cloquet Christian Academy ( K -12)
Mentor: Jeanne Otis-Krueger
Mentee: Matt Knight - English

Also:
Karen McKenna, Curriculum Coordinator
Yvette Maijala, District Technology Coordinator


GROUP 2: (10 teachers / middle - high school)

Cloquet Middle School
Mentor: Andrew Mettner
Mentees: Richard Rhoades - Industrial Technology
Mary Jane Lundberg - Family and Consumer Sciences

Cloquet Area Alternative Education Program
Mentor: Adam Kemptar / middle + high school
Mentee:Sue Thomason - Tech Coordinator

Cloquet Senior High School
Mentor: Julie Deters
Mentees:
Chris Swanson - Social Studies
Rene' Montgomery - English

Carlton Senior High School
Mentor: Jake Gunderson (Industrial tech)
Mentee: Jeremy Weaver - Math

What to Bring to Workshop

Please Bring:

Pencil, pens and paper (for notes and sketches)

Headphones ( for garageband sound editing)

Jump drive and/or cds and dvds for backup of digital projects

Your most playful and open attitude toward new technology.

Your questions and ideas about integrating media art into your own classroom.

AND, if you have one of these please bring:
Digital still or video camera (+ firewire or other transfer cords)

Directions to UMD

Driving Directions:
From I-35:
Follow I-35 North to 21st Avenue East exit (Exit #258). Follow 21st Ave East to Woodland Ave (top of the hill). Turn right onto Woodland Ave. Continue on Woodland to St. Marie Street. Turn left on St. Marie Street. Go Left on University Drive. Park in Pay Lot G. (should be free parking on January 11th)

Directions from Parking lot to School of Business building:
Cross parking lot toward Library Building (Library has a dome / tower).
School of Business and Economics Building (SBE) is right next to the Library.
Enter the exterior entrance to SBE and find room 140, the first room on your right.

for map go to:
http://www.d.umn.edu/maps/SBE/

What is Media Art?

Media arts is the study and practice of human communication through photography, film or video, audio, computer or digital arts, and interactive media. Students exploring this category of art creatively structior the elements of space, time, light, motion, color and sound to express their perspectives, feeling and ideas. They learn to critically interpret and evaluate media within aesthetic, cultural and historical contexts...

The elements of media arts are:
Image / Sound / Space / Time / Motion / Sequence...

MORE INFO Perpich Center for Arts Education
www.pcae.k12.mn.us

Artopia > great one minute FLASH intro to the history of media!
http://www.knowitall.org/artopia/media/movie/movie.swf


more about the Minnesota High School Media Arts Standard...

Continue reading "What is Media Art?" »

Media Art Terms

The elements of media arts are (as defined by Minnesota Standards) :

Image
refers to what we view within a given frame, in either the natural or constructed environment. Composition,light and color are important aspects of the image that can be deliberately manipulated for specific expressive and communication purposes. Changes in attributes of color,such as hue,saturation, brightness,contrast and type of light (natural or artificial),influence emotions or perceptions.Attributes of light that affect the image include contrast,hardness or softness,direction and amount.The compositionof the image is defined by the elements of visual arts (line,shape,form,texture,depth).In addition,the characteristic of the lens affects the composition through focal length,depth of field and focus.

Sound

(dialogue, music, voice-over and sound effects) has five basic functions:information, outer orientation (environment), inner orientation (mood), energy (emotion), and structure.The formal elements of audio are:volume, mix, density, rhythm, tempo, spatial acoustics, and pitch.

Space
in the image is structured by aspect ratio (frame dimension),object,and image size.Space is defined by the direction and movement of the lines in the composition within the frame,object framing,and balance. Height, width and depth are created through the use of camera position and action. Depth can be manipulated through the characteristics of lenses, motion within the frame, graphics, and text.The sense of space can be modified by sound through mixing and panning.

Time
may be expanded or contracted,slowed down or speeded up.The viewer’s experience of the passage of time is determined through capturing and editing.The pace of the piece may be consistent or varied.In photography,time is controlled with the use of the shutter speed.Rhythm and tempo in sound is manipulated to construct meaning. In interactive media, time is subjective because of the non-linear selection process.

Motion
is articulated by action in front of the camera, the camera itself, editing, transitions, lens zoom or focus, and animation.In photography,the illusion of motion is constructed with the shutter speed to blur the image or stop the action.

Sequence
is the ordering of images and sounds in the process of scripting, capturing, and editing through conventions of narrative, rhetoric and association. Media Arts



MORE MEDIA ART VOCABULARY:


ART : 21 glossary from PBS
http://www.pbs.org/art21/education/glossary_pop.html

UNESCO Knowledge Portal / Variable Media Glossary
http://variablemedia.net/pdf/Glossary_ENG.pdf
DIGIArts
http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=1391&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Young Digital Creators (YDC)
UNESCO’s Young Digital Creators / lesson plans
http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=5334&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

modernism
An historical period and attitude from the early to mid-20th century, characterized by experimentation, abstraction, a desire to provoke, and a belief in progress. Modern artists strove to go beyond that which had come before. Works of modern art may be visually different and yet share the same commitment to questioning artistic conventions. Modern Art is oriented towards developing new visual languages (rather than preserving and continuing those of the past) and takes the form of a series of periods, schools, and styles.

postmodernism
A term that has come to describe the stylistic developments that depart from the norms of modernism. Postmodernism questions the validity of the emphasis of modernists on logic, simplicity, and order, suggesting that ambiguity, uncertainty, and contradiction may also have a valid place.

narrative
The representation in art, by form and content, of an event or story. Whether a literal story, event, or subject matter—or a more abstract relationship between colors, forms and materials—narrative in visual art applies as much to the work as it does to the viewer's "story" of what they see and experience.

Glossary of Digital Art and Printmaking Terms
by the Digital Art Practices & Terminology Task Force (DAPTTF)
http://www.dpandi.com/DAPTTF/glossary.html

New Media Art -Excellent intro to the book:
https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/New+Media+Art+-+Introduction