Short Film Project Reflection

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Please post to blog by Final Exam / Friday May 17:

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name:
Project Title:
Collaborators and their roles:
Link to your project on Vimeo:

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
Describe your own pre-production activities and tasks: (such as:
writing, sketching, storyboarding, character design, prop /costume
research, location scouting, test shooting, etc)

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1:
SHOOT 2:
SHOOT 3:
What jobs did you do, what went well.
What equipment did you use? What shot choices did you make?
How did you light each shoot? How did you capture sound?
What challenges came up and how did you meet them?
How was the experience directing and working with actors?
How did you respond to unforeseen variables?

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Describe additional tasks and roles you took on to wrap up your project
Did you have to rewrite or reshoot anything?
Did you create any special effects or animation?
How did you work with sound, music, voice-over?

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie:
Run Time:

Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.

What aesthetic and technical choices did you make to create a unified story?
What choices of shot types, rhythm, pacing, cuts and transitions did
you make as an editor?
How do you think these choices support the emotions or ideas you hope
to communicate to your audience?
What issues came up as you worked with the captured video and audio in
the digital editing software?
How did you create solutions when technical problems came up?
What works best about your edit of the team project?
What might you do differently if you had more time and experience?

16 Comments

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name: Brady Roy
Project Title: Red Parasol Project
Collaborators and their roles: Kate Bendel (Filmer/Director) Marissa Murdy (Filmer Director)
Link to your project on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/66262320

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
First, the idea was created for the movie and proposed to the class. After this, I was added to the group and we started by creating scenes in our head and sketching them into storyboards. After choosing our characters and creating their appearance we received our actors, we then started mapping out spots to shoot, gaining permission, and then executing.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
SHOOT 1: Coffee Shop, Sunny Day, Blue Sky
SHOOT 2: Coffee Shop and City Streets
SHOOT 3: City Streets and Neighborhood
My main job was to film, but I also had a side role acting as one of the main characters. Filming went very well and we were able to get very creating with our shot choices when we worked as a team. We used 3 separate cameras, tripods, and shoulder mounts to get the shots seen the film. We had no trouble lighting each shoot because they were all film outdoors or through naturally lit windows. My video has no sound except music, so there was no need to worry about capturing the audio. Overall I think each shoot had its ups and downs, but in the end they each turned out great.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Everything went smoothly the first time through and there was no need to re write or re shoot anything. I created a couple special effects like a slow motion scene, and also a scene where an actor actually disappears, it was tricky but we were able to execute the shot. I worked with copyright free music to make the soundtrack and that is all it took to bring life to the film.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Chasing Red
Run Time: 2:20

Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.

To create the story of Chasing Red, I used techniques I have learned throughout the class. I tried to make the scenes eerie and have a dark feel to them; I used an old-fashioned film look to give some unique scenes the feel of an old Sherlock Holmes movie. I tried to give my film a fast pace so that the viewer would not find themselves bored while watching it, although some cuts are slower than others to draw you into smaller detail. The emotion in the film is supposed to signify mystery and desire, but also a sense of courage. I think this will be easy to identify for the audience. Luckily I had no issues editing this piece and I feel that it turned out very well. I believe the part that works the best is having no vocals. If I had more time and experience I would probably choose to create a movie with a different story line.

Kate Bendel
Mystery Man
Crew: Kate Bendel, Marissa Murdy, & Brady Roy
Actors: Agnieszka Oszast- Molly, Kate Zehr- Rachel
https://vimeo.com/66299401

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
For the pre-production, Marissa and I wrote down different shot types for each scene that we wanted. We filled out a new shot list for each scene. We then gave the sheets to Brady and he did the storyboard sketches. Marissa and I also went downtown and to the mansion and took pictures for our pitch. The storyline was a collaborate idea between Marissa and I.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: Day one was a challenge because we were dealing with the noise of the coffee shop and all of the commotion of downtown Duluth. We had a boom mic that we were initially going to use; however, it wasn’t picking up the sound. We problem solved by having one of the cameras right underneath them to pick up the sound. The light was a bit harsh inside the coffee shop from the sun so we took more shots from the window, and visually I think it looks more appealing. Another challenge we faced was recording with two cameras at once and making sure we weren’t in each other’s shots. We made sure we couldn’t see any reflections from ourselves in the window. Marissa and I did most of the filming/directing for this scene. The actors were really understanding of the challenges we faced and did a great job for this scene. For this scene we used three cameras (two Nikons-D3100 & D3200 and a Canon) and tripods.

SHOOT 2: Marissa unfortunately couldn’t make it this shoot so I was in charge of the filming while Brady was in most of the scenes. For all of the shots, I used a shoulder mount. This day went a lot quicker than the first day because of less technical things we had to deal with. Overall, I think it was pretty successful; however, I think we could have done a few more takes of some parts. It was difficult to walk backwards and record at the same time, while trying to go the actor’s pace. We tried different angles to try and resolve that. The sound for this scene was also challenging because of the loud noises in the streets and we also had quite a lot of dialogue. Some takes the sound was clearer so I will just have to match it with another clip.

SHOOT 3: Shoot three was also a challenge because we didn’t have the full two hours to shoot. It was a bit rushed; however, I think we came out with some great shots. The sound was much easier to record in the house because there weren’t any background noises. The entryway was pretty small so we had limited angles to choose from; however, it allowed us to get some nice close-ups. Again, we used natural lighting like all of the other shoots. The actors did a great job today and contributed on how we could film each scene. We used two cameras at this shoot, the shoulder mount, and a tripod.

Part 3: POST-PRODUCTION
We didn’t reshoot anything and the script wasn’t rewritten at all. The actors improvised some of the dialogue. For the sound, I worked with intertwining dialogue, music, and sound effects. I wanted the parts where there was no dialogue to capture emotion through the music. Different sound effects were applied to enhance the mood of songs such as a sharp string sound.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Mystery Man
Run Time: 4:50

To make the story more unified, I wanted the different scenes to have a few moments of cutting to black in between them. I also wanted to use music to showcase each individual mood of each scene. It starts out with a nice acoustic song to a mysterious sound to an adventurous song. I wanted a good variety of emotions to pour out from the songs.

I had a specific pacing I wanted for the beginning, middle, and end. The beginning and end are definitely a lot slower cuts to showcase the relaxation at the coffee shop and then the disbelief at the end. The middle is chaotic and stalkerish so I wanted the cuts to be choppy and shorter. Through out the video, I wanted the cuts to be clean and for the choppier cuts I left a split second of black in between them. I believe this is a good transition technique was it implies there was a gap in-between time, even if it were for just a second. For the shots where they’re being followed and the very end, I wanted them to be close ups to really capture the emotion. I believe I was successful in getting across emotions from the pacing of the editing. You definitely feel uneasy during the middle scenes.

I didn’t have any issues directly with the software; however, it is difficult to balance the audio so the whole video sounds cohesive, without one part being too loud. You also aren’t sure how it’s going to sound when you show it to the class, whether or not you made the sound too low or too high.
I did a lot of viewing of the video and was pretty picky on a lot of places. All of my problems aren’t solved right away; there is a lot of playing around with clips and seeing how different video/audio goes together. It was a challenge lining up audio to another clip that wasn’t its original source. Also, making sure the videos were consistent juxtaposed together and didn’t have major contrasting differences. I think the pacing of the editing placed with the music worked best for my video. If I had more time I think I would even further edit the audio where there is dialogue. I spent a good amount of time working on it and I still found a few details that bothered me. In addition, I think I would try and make sure we have exactly what we need in each shot; instead of assuming it looks all right. A lot of times the shots are blurry when it didn’t appear so on the camera. It is frustrating for those shots because you still want to use them in the video because they look compositionally appealing

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Rick McLean
“Crimson and Cerulean”
Featuring the work of:
Kat Harpster-Location scout, production, and cinematography.
Brittany Hecker- Writer, costume design, and cinematography.
Stephanie Hammon – Crimson
Emily LaBonte – Cerulean
Loretta Anne Miller – Violet

http://vimeo.com/66343996

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
After we had our general idea as introduced by Brittany to the class we set to work storyboarding and figuring out where we wanted to shoot. Given the topic of Brittany’s idea surrounding architecture and development we wanted to make sure to include as much of Duluth’s look as possible. We then began designing costumes and gathering the resources we had to make them look at least as close as we could to the initial ideas.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Our first day of shooting we met at Kat’s house and got the bulk of our interior shots done where we introduced our characters. We used available lighting and minimal sound equipment. I was on camera duty for the most part which we took turns on to make sure everybody got to shoot what they wanted to shoot. We ran in to some audio difficulties that I was able to fix for the most part in post-production but it posed as a reminder to always match up your sound.
The second “shoot-day” we recorded voice overs. When weren’t able to reserve the equipment we had initially hoped to use to record I decided to move things to into the radio station where I work to capture our sound.
The final day of shooting began again at Kat’s house to get everything we needed to wrap up those scenes followed by shooting around downtown to show the alter-ego characters in full action. Outdoors, especially in busy public places where parking meters are running and the town is hustling and bustling, can be very difficult to control in terms of audio and lighting but we made do with what we had and got some great action shots.
The snow of course was another hold back but we adjusted by changing a character to be a snowball wielding heroine instead of our initial idea of water ballons. Which I think worked out for the better.
The actors were very helpful and very patient and were willing to add in input when need, develop their characters on their own, and overall help pull the project together with enthusiasm and great performances.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
We each went off on our own to edit the project and met to transfer files. We ran in to a few bumps here with a few missing shots and dropped audio that we hadn’t noticed during shooting. I remedied this in mine by changing the story a bit to focus more on the action and added in a music track to help fill any spaces that needed to be filled. I also added in additional sound effects to help set atmosphere and fill in any cracks.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Crimson and Cerulean
Run Time: 2:45
My final edit turned out in a different way than I had thought it would but I’m happy with the results. I tried to create a feeling of a slow start to capture the characters’ boredom and build up as the tension grew. I used a lot of fast cuts and added in a few transitions in areas where there was a significant passing of time. The overall feeling of the film was supposed to be light-hearted which I think was captured well.
As I had mentioned there were some issues surrounding dropped audio, a few missing shots, and a few lose ends. But I took this as an opportunity to work with what we had to create a different mood, which in my cut was supposed to be that of a fantasy world rather than an actual adventure between roommates.
If I had more time I would have fleshed out our idea more specifically for our actors and added in more graphic effects to give a more comic book feel to the film. But overall I think it turned out to be a fun video that I hope people enjoy.

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION

Your Name: Sarah Heil

Project Title: Daydream

Collaborators and their roles: Emyli Gudmundson (writer, director, cameralady, musician), Keri Koskineimi (cameralady), Niki Tatge (musician), Abigail Hegerfeld (musician), Katie Workman (choreographer, actress), Daniel Novick (actor), Caity Shea Violette (actress).

Link to your project on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/66344527?email_id=Y2xpcF90cmFuc2NvZGVkfDgwMjE4MDMzZjE2NzQ1YmQxMmM0MTIwMTllNDAwZTY2NzY3fDE2MjczMjM2fDEzNjg3MzQwNDg%3D&utm_campaign=7701&utm_medium=clip-transcode_complete-finished-20120100&utm_source=email

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
Sketching, storyboarding, location scouting

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: Filmed at Lief Erickson Park in the early morning. Went to Katie Workman’s apartment to film in the afternoon. Went to Emyli Gudmundson’s apartment to film in the evening. Bought two items for use as props.

SHOOT 2: Filmed in a professor’s office. Emyli, Keri, and I filmed. Emyli directed.

SHOOT 3: Filmed the dance and date scenes at the Teatro. Filmed at Lief Erickson Park at night. Emyli, Keri, and I filmed. Emyli directed.

SHOOT 4: Filmed classroom scene during class. Keri and I filmed, Emyli directed.

What jobs did you do, what went well.
I primarily filmed. If I felt that there was an angle that we could use, or a segment the scene, I would suggest and film it.

What equipment did you use? What shot choices did you make?
For the most part I used one of the cameras we borrowed, but I also used my own DSLR on occasion. I also usually used a tripod. Sometimes I used the shoulder mount as well (such as during the dance scene).

How did you light each shoot? How did you capture sound?
We used natural lighting for all the outdoor scenes; we did not use any artificial lights for those scenes. When shooting in Katie Workman’s apartment, we mostly used artificial light, but in the living room also used natural light coming in from the windows. At Emyli’s apartment and the dance scene, we used artificial light. For the date scene, we used a mix of natural and artificial light. We used what light was available, and did not “supply” any of it ourselves. We did not use sound in our films, so we did not make any attempts to capture it while filming.

What challenges came up and how did you meet them?
The biggest challenge was the weather. We had to repeatedly reschedule the classroom scene, because every planned day was cancelled due to snow days. After the last snow day, we could no longer go through with our original plan, and had to compensate by filming our class during class time.

How was the experience directing and working with actors?
It was a phenomenal experience. I have previously helped film majors with their projects (at MSUM, not UMD), and it was a good experience to work on the other side of the camera.

How did you respond to unforeseen variables?
The biggest unforeseen variables were the snow days that we had. For each snow day, we rescheduled, and ended up filming in an environment we did not original plan for. However, we made it work to suit our needs.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Emyli, Keri and I exchanged footage with each other.

Did you have to rewrite or reshoot anything?
We did not.

Did you create any special effects or animation?
I did not.

How did you work with sound, music, voice-over?
I used music created by Emyli, Nikki Tatge, and Abigail Hegerfeld. I did not use any sound recorded while filming, and no voice-overs.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Daydream

Run Time: 4:54

Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.
What aesthetic and technical choices did you make to create a unified story?
I attempted to use a lot of quick edits, but had to drop the idea due to time constraint. I used music made for the movie and segments that started/end in fades to/from black to show different times/scenes. I sped up some clips as well.

What choices of shot types, rhythm, pacing, cuts and transitions did you make as an editor?
I used a lot of medium shots. I tried to keep the pace quick. Transitions were fades to/from black.

How do you think these choices support the emotions or ideas you hope
to communicate to your audience?
I think that they help show angst (such as in the fight sequence) or a slight confusion (like in the dream sequence, because dreams are not always easy to follow).

What issues came up as you worked with the captured video and audio in
the digital editing software?
Many of the files were originally MTS files, so I had to convert many of them. Some were originally too dark or the white balance was off, so I had to make adjustments in iMovie.

How did you create solutions when technical problems came up?
I used the software I had or could access to fix the problems as best as I could.

What works best about your edit of the team project?
Personally, I think that the dance parts are best.

What might you do differently if you had more time and experience?
I would add a lot more footage that I had to cut to get into the proper time frame.

New Vimeo link:
https://vimeo.com/66371911

Title: Daydream

https://vimeo.com/66370799

Emyli Gudmundson (writer, director, musician)

Collaborators and their roles: Sarah Heil (cameralady, storyboarder) Keri Koskineimi (cameralady, photographer), Niki Tatge (musician), Abigail Hegerfeld (musician), Katie Workman (choreographer, actress), Daniel Novick (actor), Caity Shea Violette (actress).


Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
For preproduction, I was primarily responsible for writing the story and working with actors on character development. As the other two members of my group at more design/photography experience, it seemed logical for them to do the majority of the cinematography and story boarding.
Part 2 : ON THE SET
DAY ONE: We shot the majority of our footage in one day. Our main challenge of the day was that we wanted to film outside, and it was raining/slash snowing. Luckily, with lots of patience and blankets we were able to get great footage. Later that day we moved to filming in Katie’s apartment and my apartment. For all of these shoots we used natural light or the lighting that already existed in our apartments.
DAY TWO: This shoot was in the Teatro Zuccone, where we filmed the dance number. Since I work for the Teatro and have technical theatre training, I was responsible for creating the lighting and set. We used stage lights for this shoot.
For all of the shoots, I worked as the director since I have worked with the actors before and have worked as a director and an actor before.
The biggest challenge was the weather. We had to repeatedly reschedule the classroom scene, because every planned day was cancelled due to snow days. After the last snow day, we could no longer go through with our original plan, and had to compensate by filming our class during class time.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Each worked separately to edit our pieces. Luckily we didn’t have to reshoot anything. In the beginning of my edit, I chose to use text to help convey my story. Also, there is a fight scene. I wanted to enhance the drama of this scene so I played with speed, both slowing down and speeding up certain sections.
Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Daydream
Run Time: 5:11
I love the confusion in the film, but I would have like to make a bit more vague in some places and a bit clearer in other. I would do this with better editing software and by adding A LOT of footage that I had to remove due to the required time frame.

Marissa Murdy
The Mystery Man
Crew:Kate Bendel & Brady Roy
Actors: Agnieszka Oszast - Molly, Kate Zehr- Rachel

https://vimeo.com/66369823

part 1.
I helped take photos of the locations with Kate, we filled out a shot list for each scene, Brady sketched out each scene, Kate and I wrote the plot and dialogue, character design and location scouting.


Part 2.
Shoot 1: We filmed at Starbucks downtown. I mainly filmed through the Window and on the street, using natural light. We filmed them drinking coffee and talking and then leaving the coffee shop. The noise was the most difficult part in the coffee shop, Brady filmed inside while Kate and I filmed outside. We started filming the mystery man following the girls. These were shot on the street, I filmed across the street to get long shots as well as medium shots of the girls walking, while Kate filmed close ups.

Shoot 2. I was out of town, due to a family emergency.

shoot 3. We filmed on the streets by the mansion as well as the porch of the mansion. I mainly shot through the windows again as well as close ups of what they find. Kate focused on close ups again.The red umbrella really stood out in the snow, it worked out well. It was really bright on this day but I think we worked with it well and it was still cohesive with the other days. It felt a little rushed because we didn’t have the full 2 hours but we finished all of the scenes we had planned.


I think we all worked well and got most of the shots on the first or second take. I mainly used a tripod along with some hand held work at the house. We used all natural lighting, I think the colors turned out great. The sound was the most difficult part of this film, in the coffee shop it was hard to hear them and the microphones didn’t seem to work. Even though it didn’t work, the actors did well improvising. I decided that the dialogue wasn’t too important so I put music on top of the whole film. Directing and communicating on set was the most challenging because we hadn’t worked with actors before. Just remembering to say the lines such as “rolling, action, cut” were so important but we helped each other out.

Post Production
I decided to make faster cuts and make a shorter film that ended up being under 4 minutes. I focused more on the the street scenes of the stalking and following. I really liked how the colors turned out so I kept that the same. I used simple techniques such as cross dissolves and fade outs to show time. I am more interested in what I capture in film than what special effects I can create in post production. The sound was difficult but I found a song on Jamendo that is very mysterious and fits the mood.

Final Edit:
Title: The Mystery Man
Run time: 3:40

I unified the whole piece with mysterious and horror music. I chose a range of shots, mainly going from long shots of the mystery man walking to close ups of the girls walking. I think this creating mystery and curiosity to the film. We had problems with the sound in the coffee shop, in order to fix this we used one camera to record just the sound, we also just recorded ambient sounds. In my edit, I decided the dialogue wasn’t needed and I am interested in films where the audiences ask questions and want to more know about a film. I think it is interesting that all of our edits are different and we all had our own idea of the film. If I had more time and experience I would have planned out the shots more and added more to the plot. When we filmed it seemed a little rushed at times so I wish we could have planned out more of the shots. Overall, I was very happy with the actors and the final edit.

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film/ Project Reflection
Keri Koskiniemi
Daydream
Emyli Gudmundson-director/camera person
Sarah Heil- camera person
https://vimeo.com/66296021

Part 1: Pre-production
In planning our film we had a little head start because we knew we wanted to base the film largely on the screenplay that Emyli wrote so most of the storyline (other then some tweaks we made) was planned out. We had some specific shots we wanted to get. I attempted to sketch the shots that I really wanted to get. We let the actors coordinate their own clothing for the film, though we did give them some general ideas and guidelines that we discussed. I helped with some props, before shooting I photographed Caity-Shea and Daniel’s couple photos that we placed around the apartment.

Part 2: On the Set
Shoot day 1: In our first day of shooting we shot the proposal scene in Leif Erickson, the wake up scene and scene of Katie looking and the drawing and leaving for the run in Katie’s apartment, and then the wake up scene and fight scene where Caity-Shea makes dinner in Emyli’s apartment.
This first day I did a lot of camera work. I spent the entire day behind the camera, most of the time we would have 2 or 3 cameras filming at once so usually we would all be behind one of them. We used the shoulder rig, two tripods as well as two Panasonic GH2s and my Canon 60D. We attempted to use the tripod dolly but that didn’t work out too well. I tried to do some zoom ins and outs some worked but not all of them. I also tried to think outside the box and look on location for different angles and shots that would be interesting. Getting a good variety of shots was very important to me. We used all natural/environmental lighting. We got some sound on camera mics but not all is usable. In most of the video, audio isn’t very important.
Day two of shooting we were lucky enough to use Austin Jone’s office to shoot a scene of Daniel at work. I think for working in such close quarters we got some really great shots. We even had all three camera’s rolling at once. I was able to get some great environmental sounds on my camera from this shoot. We used the same equipment and environmental light again here and throughout the rest of the filming. Working with the actors was amazing, not only are they extremely talented at acting but they also pitched in and had some great ideas for shots and so on. For example in the next shoot on our 3rd day of shooting we shot the dance scene that was choreographed by Katie Workman. We also filmed the date scene in the dream (I didn’t include this scene in my version), and reshot Daniel coming home from work after having technical difficulties the other day with my auto focus. We also shot later that night to shoot the meeting scene at the end. We did face some difficulty in a time restraint with the sun quickly setting and we were losing daylight but we got some beautiful colors in. Last shoot was the classroom shoot, I was so appreciative of our class helping us and pitching in, especially Rick who stepped up to be our last minute professor. Overall I had a blast doing all of this camera work and collaborating not only with my fellow filmmakers (who are fantastic) but also with the extremely talented actors, it was truly a privilege. I have learned a lot about cinematography in this process.

Part 3: Post- production

In my post production process I tried to focus on clarity of the story and cutting it down to the vital parts. I used the audio we got off the cameras for some of the audio. The rest of it was music from Emyli and her wonderful friends. For sound I went back and forth between environmental and some dialog (most isn’t vital to understanding the story line) and the music. The alarm clock sound I got from freesound.org. As far as special effects go, I added a black and white filter over the dream sequences as we as a fast radial blur. I adjusted speeds of some clips a little and played with transitions somewhat. I did cut out the date scene and cut some other scene very short compared to what I was expecting them to be.

Part 4: My Final Edit
Title: Daydream
Run time: 4 minutes 38 seconds

I think as far as aesthetics go making the dream sequences black and white and adding the blur really helps to show the difference between “reality” and dream. I tried to change the pacing and rhythm of the film depending on the scene and vary them so we don’t get lulled to sleep. I tried to edit in the best most interesting shots and get a good variety of establishing shots and close ups, etc. I hope that everything I did in editing shows the beauty of this story. Some scenes had multiple takes and other factors made matching shots up to create a scene difficult at times but once I got in the flow of it, it got easier. The audio was also difficult to get just right, some scenes were just naturally louder or softer. I think if we had more time I would make a longer movie and I would focus even more on the different shots that I get and really work even more

Digital Filmmaking: Visual Narratives Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name: Missy Smetana
Project Title: April
Collaborators and their roles:
Crew: Kendra Jaeger and Bethany Bourgoin
Cast: Abigail Hegerfeld, Elizabeth Efteland, and Paul LeNave

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
For preproduction, we first needed to create more detailed descriptions of our actors. We also created a calendar depicting when everyone was available to shoot and then figured out when and where we could start shooting. We worked out a tentative shooting schedule and updated it as the shoot date approached. We wrote out a list of what the actors could do during the day in minor detail and some lines that the actors could possibly say. Before we presented our pitch to be green-lighted, we traveled to the locations that we planned to shoot at. This really helped us in setting up the scenes, planning the shot list, and the script depicting the actor’s actions. After we visited these places, we started creating more detailed documents such as the dialog script, shot list, acting script, equipment list, and costume design. We recorded our conversations on Kendra’s iPad, so we could recall our thoughts at a later time. The storyboards were also created on the iPad. Before we shot our scenes, the crew got together either a couple days before or earlier in the day to run through the shots, so we knew what equipment we needed and the exact shots we wanted to make sure that we got. I also researched Asperger’s and Autism before we started shooting by watching a couple documentaries to help and educate myself on the condition.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: Thursday April 11. Kendra, Bethany, Elizabeth, Paul, and I were present at the shoot. We shot at Burrito Union for the bar scene. Being the first day of shooting, a couple technical issues came up, but we were able to work them all out. The actors did a wonderful job. They did a fabulous job with costumes, playing their characters, and improvising their lines from the outline we had previously given them. We were able to finish most of the bar scenes; however, we will need to have at least one more day of shooting. After we cleaned up and downloaded our video and sound, Kendra, Bethany, and I worked out another schedule for future shoots.
SHOOT 2: Saturday April 13. Kendra, Bethany, Abigail, and I were present for this shoot. We shot the scenes inside the school. We wanted to do these scenes on a weekend, so we could control who was included in the shot visually and in relation to the sound. We were planning on shooting in the art history classroom; however, the room was locked. We checked the other lecture halls, and those were all being used for ACT testing. We finally decided on the Wedge. I personally am happy with our decision to film here. The lighting was beautiful and we had plenty of space to shoot. Abigail did a wonderful job especially with the scene depicting her freak out episode. She, like the other two actors are very talented. We had some issues however. We weren’t able to get any extras; however, after the cameras were set up and focused, Bethany and I stood in as the extras. This system worked out well. During this day of shooting, we were able to get Llana’s studying taken care of and her entering and leaving the school.
SHOOT 3: Sunday April 14. Kendra, Bethany, Abigail, and I were present at this shoot. We shot these clips at Bethany’s house in her bathroom and kitchen. We shot Abigail getting ready in the bathroom and making and eating breakfast. It was somewhat difficult to angle the camera so its reflection wouldn’t be seen in the mirror. However, we were able to make it work. Shooting in the kitchen went relatively smoothly. We used all natural light to light the room. We got some really nice close up shots of her making breakfast.
SHOOT 4: Thursday April 18. Kendra, Bethany, Elizabeth, Paul, and I were present at this shoot. We continued shooting the bar scene at Burrito Union today. We finished up the scenes that we didn’t get to the last time we shot at the location. The most difficult part of the day was that we were shooting with only 1 camera.
SHOOT 5: Tuesday April 23. Kendra, Bethany, Abigail, Paul, and I were present for this shoot. Today was our longest shoot date in which we shot all our outside shots. In the beginning of the project, we were hoping to shoot in the rain. However, this didn’t end up working out. This was almost completely the opposite. It snowed really hard the night before, so there was a lot of snow both on the ground and in the trees. It was beautiful and sunny however. We where able to get some awesome shots and the actors did a very good job acting.
SHOOT 6: Thursday April 25. Kendra, Bethany, Abigail, and I were present for this shoot. We shot at Kendra’s house in her extra bedroom for Llana’s room. Shooting for this shot went smoothly, and we didn’t run across any issues while shooting.
What jobs did you do, what went well.
My jobs varied from shoot to shoot and scene to scene. Everyone on the team did the same amount of work, and our jobs would change depending on the scene. If there was a certain shot that someone wanted to get for example, they were in charge of setting the camera up for that shot. All of our shooting went really well. The only difficulties that we had were scheduling on some days, and one day we were short a camera. But, we worked with what we had and shooting went very smoothly.
What equipment did you use?
We used 2 Nikon DSLRs, 2 tripods, Zoom, stabilizer, and cobra crane.
What shot choices did you make?
We tried to get a variation of shot depths and angles. We also looked around our surroundings and tried to include interesting aspects of that location in our shots.
How did you light each shoot?
In Burrito Union, we used some high-grade hot lights on one shoot and the lights that are normally on in the bar. However, most of the light illuminating the bar was natural light. Most of the light we used to light the shoots was natural light.
How did you capture sound?
To capture sound, we used a Zoom.
What challenges came up and how did you meet them?
The most challenging days were the two bar scenes. The first shoot day was in the bar, and we needed to get used to the equipment that we were using. We had intentions of using a boom mic to capture the sound; however, when we went to set up the kit, we realized that the Hub didn’t give us an adapter to hook up to record the sound. Kendra had a Zoom checked out, so we turned to using that. We also had some time difficulties when shooting on the 4th shoot. The cleaning lady hadn’t been to Burrito Union yet to clean it from the night before, so we had to wait an hour until we could start shooting. Another issue we had was working with the weather. We had intentions of capturing rain; however, we ended up capturing a new snow. It did turn out beautiful nonetheless.
How was the experience directing and working with actors?
The actors were awesome. I don’t have enough nice things to say about them. They were amazing at what they do. We tried not to direct them too much, as to not kill their creativity. We pushed them in the direction we wanted, and they took the lead in what they needed to do. When we wanted to reshoot something, they were very open to doing another take. They did an awesome job acting, and I think they brought a nice flair to the piece. They were the perfect actors for our piece.
How did you respond to unforeseen variables?
We dealt with the issues very rationally. We were pretty prepared, and had back up equipment and such. Also, when we were down a camera, we just had to shoot the same scene many times, and the actors did a great job keeping their acting consistent.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Describe additional tasks and roles you took on to wrap up your project
Did you have to rewrite or reshoot anything?
No
Did you create any special effects or animation?
No
How did you work with sound, music, voice-over?
I used the original sound from the videos and from the zoom we used. In some areas were the sound isn’t important and the scenes are more cut away scenes, I added noise so it wasn’t silent.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie:
April
Run Time:
5 minutes
Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.
It was really hard to cut. I ended up having to eliminate some cut away scenes that I liked. I did this so I could show more of the actors acting abilities because they did such an awesome job.
What aesthetic and technical choices did you make to create a unified story?
I made the lighting look realistic. Didn’t do any crazy effects.
What choices of shot types, rhythm, pacing, cuts and transitions did
you make as an editor?
I more went by what I felt was right with shot choices. I did the same with transitions. If I felt like it needed a dissolve, I added one.
How do you think these choices support the emotions or ideas you hope
to communicate to your audience?
I hope that the audience can feel like my video is relatable or easily understandable in an everyday life situation.
What issues came up as you worked with the captured video and audio in
the digital editing software?
We shot on auto which was a terrible idea. We had a lot of lighting issues that I tried to fix as much as I could. Noise was also a big deal in some of the shots. In the bar and kitchen there were fridges running that couldn’t be unplugged.
How did you create solutions when technical problems came up?
YouTube videos, tried different software settings, and used the skills I had.
How successful is the final product?
I believe it is successful. I however, am more of a fan of my longer cut because I was able to include the awesome cutaway shots we got.
What might you do differently if you had more time and experience?
In filming for audio, say what scene you are shooting. That would make it a lot easier to match clips. Not shoot on auto. Maybe get a more variety of shots.

Link: https://vimeo.com/66374794

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name: Brittany V. Hecker
Project Title: Red + Blue
Collaborators and their roles: Rick McLean & Kat Harpster (co-filmers/directors)
Link to your project on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/66314285

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
Describe your own pre-production activities and tasks: I created muchof or most of the original story. I wrote parts of the script and designed costume ideas that I thought would represent the characters and their constructed backgrounds. I also did much of the pre-shooting for locations.
Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: We started from the middle, with the roommate related scenes at Kat's house. We had high hopes and aspirations, and everyone was relatively excited.
SHOOT 2: We finished the scenes at Kat's house
SHOOT 3: We then did all of the downtown shooting and final scenes. Actors were somewhat cold and tired of general lack of direction, but everyone persevered.
What jobs did you do, what went well: I did major action scenes and directed the intros. I think they all went well.
What equipment did you use? What shot choices did you make? We used the basic camera borrowed from Joellyn. Tripods and props were also used, and various re-shots were made through out the process.
How did you light each shoot? How did you capture sound? Sound was recorded primarily in a sound booth near KUMD thanks to Rick's connections. Lighting was primarily all natural, though was touched up later through editing.
What challenges came up and how did you meet them? Though actors got frustrated at times, and I became frustrated with rewriting the story due to loss of many clips, we were still all able to work together with the joint goal of creating something we could be proud of.
How was the experience directing and working with actors? Directing was somewhat scary at first. I realize now that you have to be distinct with what you tell others to do, and also very specific.
How did you respond to unforeseen variables? Losing some of the clips was difficult for me, as I had a very clear idea of how I wanted the story to go...but I think I adapted well with what I had.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Describe additional tasks and roles you took on to wrap up your project
Did you have to rewrite or reshoot anything? I did not get to re-shoot anything, but I did rework the plot significantly through the editing process.
Did you create any special effects or animation? I had intended to, but due to generally late shooting, I did not get the opportunity. I also lack much experience with advanced editing software, so my techniques are fairly basic.
How did you work with sound, music, voice-over? I cheesily worked in the voice overs. I think I was able to give the characters a very comedic feeling while still portraying a valid story.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Red + Blue
Run Time: 3:40

Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.

What aesthetic and technical choices did you make to create a unified story?
I trued to unify colors under character representations. Cerulean was generally in a very blue surrounding area, and same for Crimson.

What choices of shot types, rhythm, pacing, cuts and transitions did you make as an editor?
I used alot of establishing and medium shots as it was primarily shot as a comedy. I didn't need to imply closeness with the audience or camera, because the characters could be kept at a distance. I do wish I would have done more just to feature the wonderful actors, though.

How do you think these choices support the emotions or ideas you hope to communicate to your audience?
I think the film comes off much like I portrayed it.

What issues came up as you worked with the captured video and audio in the digital editing software?
Sometimes it was hard to move sounds around or to recreate them.

How did you create solutions when technical problems came up?
Luckily the voice overs gave me quality background for creating characterization. I was able to get rid of much of the background noise.

What works best about your edit of the team project?
I liked my grasp of the characters; I feel as if I knew them very well, so I was able to make fun of them through the actors, while still flattering them.

What might you do differently if you had more time and experience?
I would look much further into editing techniques, as well as how to create and manipulate quality sound. Though, I wouldn't mind -just- taking care of the editing process, not actually shooting.

Vivian Otoo
Anamnesis
Sam,Ryan,Derik,and Hannah.

For pre-production I did some of the story boards.And I did the costumes.

For the first shoot we met at Derik's house and we set up to big lights in the room. We set up the tripod for the camera. First we shot the fight scene which was in the kitchen and living room. Than we shot their first time together in the living room. And the breakfast scene. The lights were really a plus for the quality of the video clips. We made a mistake in terms of costume continuity with Derik in the fight scene and the two of them hanging out scene.

I was not able to attend shoot 2. I had to work.

The last shoot. We went to park point and it was really cold. So it was really difficult to shoot and withstand the cold. Hannah was really cold because of the light weight dress she was wearing. We actually had to stop in the middle to get coffee to warm up. The wind messed up the audio in our shoots. That's one of the reasons why I decided to put music in my post production. The actors were amazing they definitely understood each other and worked off of each other's energy. and they had great chemistry.

In my post production I had a vision of it being dream like. So I made the beach scenes black and white and made the umbrella pop up red. So I went to color correction and on the color spectrum there is the color and than the black and white so I first made the whole clip black and white. The I used the color spectrum and clicked on the red until it made the umbrella bright red. I used some slow motion in certain parts of the scenes for dramatics. I zoomed in on Derik's face at the last scene. I used different types of music for certain scenes. I really had fun editing over all it was my favorite part of this project.

Im sorry I was not able to upload to vimeo. lie i explained in the email joellyn. But hopefully this evening I will on the blog. I really apologize

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film/ Project Reflection
Ryan Holmquist
Anamnesis
With Sam Hagen and Vivian Otoo, actors Derik Iverson and Hannah Olson
MY CUT: http://vimeo.com/66344221

Part 1: Pre-production

Sam seemed to have a well-defined direction to take for the film, visually, aesthetically, and conceptually, and I trusted him because of his knowledge of film and experience. I just wanted to support the team in any way possible so I took on writing out a script (which ended up deviating far from the final project, but it was a good starting point to have one). Planning out the schedule didn't seem so hard, we planned on shooting on Saturdays when everyone was open. We all knew from the get-go that I wouldn't be available April 13th, but the rest of the team wanted to get together, so it was okay that I wasn't there. Other than that, Sam and Vivian did some storyboarding and I provided details like environments that we were going to shoot in. Ideas like Fitgers came from me, while Sam had the idea of shooting at the dunes for the "chase", based off of his artistic direction and what that would look like. Meeting the cast was fun. I was pretty happy through the whole pre-production process and imagining what it could turn out to be.

Part 2: On the Set
Shoot day 1:

I was not there, like I said above, I knew from the get-go that I'd be out of town. But it's all good.

Shoot day 2:

We went to Fitgers. I feel like it might have come together a little haphazardously because I had the idea of shooting in the basement so they have a bar/restaurant to walk out of together for the first flashback, but the lighting was terrible and we seemed to kind of just wing it when we saw the well-lit area by Mexico Lindo. I contributed to suggesting camera angles and some direction for the cast, I also manned the camera once for getting some B-roll that I don't think anyone used. I also wanted there to be more of a crowd so I walked with them down the hall (Vivian used that shot). It was kinda awkward and I know that Sam wasn't a fan of any of that footage from inside Fitgers. Oh well. But then the actors thew on coats and we went outside to shoot the 2nd flashback which occurs on a different day when the two characters are more close, and they hold hands. I shot that, and owned it. I love love love that shot of the camera panning down as they hold hands. But anyways

Day 3:

The beach was terribly cold. Hannah was freezing her butt off in that dress. We were all kinda trying to hurry with it. We even stopped halfway through to head back and blast the heat in Hannahs car, which helped. The footage was all boss though, so we're glad. It was a long day, it seemed like. Sam had a clear idea of everything we needed, so I again just trusted him and let him direct, and I helped out with holding gear and sheilding the camera from the rain, etc. Sam asked me near the end if there was any shots that I wanted to get, so I shot the shot that orbits around Derik as he's looking around like he's lost, and also the running from the front (which was terribly difficult cause I didn't see where I was going).


Part 3: Post- production

It sucked that our group was the last one to get to editing. I felt a lot of pressure then. We had our last shoot later than when Joellyn wanted us to be done. Getting all the footage from Sam was difficult too, just because of scheduling conflicts and stuff. For the editing: I get a kick out of (intentionally) throwing funky effects on stuff. I knew from the start that I wanted mine to be super dreamy and have blurring effects on the flashbacks. So I did. Just in case anyone wants to know: I used Gaussian blur, messed with the luma curve, turned up the brightness, and had a lot of reverb on the audio. I also had little cuts where it zooms in. I think that might be my trademark, I enjoy doing that for other film projects too (the zooming cuts). It didn't take me too long to edit it to where I wanted it. All in all, I might have spent 6-8 hours in editing. It comes kind of naturally to me, and I've done this kind of stuff before too.

Part 4: My Final Edit
Title: Anamnesis
Run time: 4 minutes 07 seconds

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name: Samuel Hagen
Project Title: Anamnesis
Collaborators and their roles: Vivian Otoo, Ryan Holmquist
Link to your project on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/66301516

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
We wrote a script and came up with a list of different shots for different scenes throughout. We left most of the details such as costumes up to the actors. The script mostly helped in getting across the different characters attitudes, we didn't end up going by the script during the actual shoot just because of circumstance. I scouted out 3 different locations on park point to find the best spot to shoot. I decided that the dunes on 22nd would be the best because they had the most cover and were very deep and appealing to look at. The landscape there was also very stark and beautiful to look at. It was also away from houses and other man made things other than the giant radio tower that somehow was erected within the time of my scouting and our shoot day a few weeks later.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: The indoor scenes in the flashbacks. I was able to use the media hubs new lighting kit. They were very bright and added a lot of light to the shots enabling me to get better quality video. We used a Canon 7D. All shots were done on a tripod, some panning, some still. I used an external audio recorder to record the audio in a better version than the camera could capture. I wanted to get a shotgun mic for the 7D but it wasn't the right kind and the hub had no other working audio options. I also wanted to use a steadycam for the shots but I was unable to figure out how to get it to work, there were literally 20 different variables to adjust to get a specific camera to work with it. Other than those small technical issues, we didn't run into any problems. We went completely against the original script and the actors improvised all of the dialogue. Only bits were used in the final cuts. As for directing the actors, I felt like they wanted me to be more demanding or tell them specifics, but I just wanted them to become their character and just stay in character as I captured them. It's hard to cram too many details into a film that will only be 3 minutes so I decided to just get as many shots as possible and build a story from there rather than planning it out shot by shot(that's where you run into problems). I had an idea of a few specific shots that I wanted and the way I wanted scenes to flow with lots of atmospheric shots and detail shots but I didn't plan out specifics. I wanted the environment to shape the shot rather than me tailor the environment to fit the scene.

SHOOT 2: We shot at Fitgers complex, inside and outside. Before going to the shoot I discovered that my camera battery had died. Luckily we were able to get a backup camera from the media hub. We did this shot in one of the class periods and were were really pressed for time and I completely forgot about taking atmospheric and detail shots. It ended up being only a few shots at the same angle and I was unhappy with the shoot. During our shoot there, a lady who seemed to be overseeing the complex came up to us and asked what we were shooting and asked that we make sure not to get any people or signs in the shots and I assured her that I had already considered that and tried to keep any business signs out of the shots. I ended up not using those shots in my cut anyways.

SHOOT 3: At the dunes on park point on 22nd street and Minnesota Ave. We shot all of the "chase" scene on a saturday morning. The sky was overcast which was fantastic because it is basically a giant softbox and provided for very balanced lighting. Although, it was raining, cold, and windy. Everybody was freezing during the shoot. My camera got really wet but the water on the lens protector helped add some feeling to it as if you were actually there in the rain. All we used was just the camera and tripod. The tripod doubled as a handy steadicam. It was so windy that all the sound from the shoot was unusable. The dunes were great, they provided cover from the wind and were a very interesting environment to shoot in.

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
I only used one word from the original audio in my cut of the film. The rest of the sound including the waves I created with a synthesizer. I didn't use any special effects in my version, only the vignetting in the flashbacks and basic video and audio correction tools.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie: Anamnesis
Run Time: 3:11

For each flashback scene, I tried to use the best cuts that emphasized the characters emotions. I used some jump cuts to speed along the flashbacks. I tried to match motion in as many of the shot changes as I could. It's interesting how two shots that are taken at a completely different time can transition very smoothly by chance. I tried to make my cut feel very emotional and intense. During editing, I didn't come across many technical difficulties. I used keyframes to get the audio exactly how I wanted it to sound. I recorded many different tracks of sound to see which I liked the most along with the video. If I had more time, I would have made a longer film with dialog and more details and varieties of scenes. Since it was only 3 minutes I didn't want to confuse the viewer with too many details and information to follow a complex story. I wanted to keep the narrative simple, and I feel like it came across that way in the end.

Digital Filmmaking: Short Film / PROJECT REFLECTION
Your Name: Kat Harpster
Project Title: Red VS Blue
Collaborators and their roles:
Brittany Hecker: Writer, Director, and concept designer.
Rick Mclean: Storyboarding, and Director
Stephanie Hammon: Crimson
Emily LaBonte: Cerulean
Loretta Anne Miller:Violet

Link to your project on Vimeo:
https://vimeo.com/66343996

Part 1: PRE-PRODUCTION
Luckily my team started with a solid idea of what we wanted to film. I spent most of my pre-production time working on costume research. Brittany had sketched out roughed drafts of what she wanted Crimson and Cerulean to look like, so I spent time looking at thrift shops to find costume items to contribute to the film. I also met with the group to work on getting green lit for shooting.

Part 2 : ON THE SET
Briefly describe each day of shooting.
SHOOT 1: Shoot one we shot at my rental unit. We got all of the roommate footage filmed, and since it was around noon the natural lighting was quite nice. We ordered pizza and bonded with the actors on the first shoot too, which was excellent.
SHOOT 2: During this shoot we filmed our actors as their super hero alter-ego's. We shot in a variety of outdoor locations including City hall, Duluth Public Library, and Old Main park. Luckily it was a sunny day, and we only encountered minimal weather discrepancies (wind messing with audio/Snow getting in our shoes!). Working with the actors was a completely new experience for me, luckily they stepped up to the challenge and filled their super hero shoes with gusto.

SHOOT 3: For shoot three Rick and I went around downtown shooting B-footage of Duluth. It was another beautiful day, but the lighting was a bit more tricky, and many of the shots we got were just too dark (at least before post-production).

Part 3 : POST-PRODUCTION
Post-production is really when this project came to life for me. I attempted to use Pinnacle Studio Ultimate again, because I am very comfortable with it, but I regret that now because it limited my audio quality, and gave me many headaches. I was excited to try to incorporate the voice-over monologues we captured, and I think I managed to make the few I used to mesh well, and add to the story. Some struggles I encountered in post production, firstly some of the audio on the clips was lost, making them unusable, also my laptop doesn't have a high render rate, causing my project to freeze and completely delete in one case.

Part 4: YOUR FINAL EDIT
Title of your movie:Red VS Blue
Run Time: 2:45

Reflect upon your final edit of the short film project.
Overall I am slightly disappointed by to coherency of the plot, I feel like with one more shoot date we could have gotten into more background and character development. I tried to keep it a high pace comedy, choosing to center on the charming "nerdiness" of the characters. I only used one transition to distinguish between the super hero's vs. roommates, as I wanted it to be a clear change of pace.I'm not sure if my story is truly that unified, but I attempted to make seamless cuts. Also adding audio and sound effects made a huge difference in my particular edit. Aesthetically I was shooting for a campy comedy feel, with just a dash of heroism, might have leaned a bit to the cheesy side. Honestly if I could do this again I would use After effects, instead of Pinnacle. That change alone would have saved me a day or two of work, which during finals week is a high commodity. Because of the slow rendering rate, I couldn't do more advanced chroma-key editing, and film overlaying, as it caused complete shutdown of the software, so to work around that I was forced into doing simple edits. On the technical side this project was a disaster, but I overcame as much as a could, and came out relatively sane, so I would say it was a success. Wonderful experience working with the actors, and my team, I can't wait to see their edits as well!

Name: Bethany Bourgoin
Project Title: April
Collaborators and their roles: Missy Smetana & Kendra Jaeger as filmmakers, Abigail Hegerfeld, Elizabeth Efteland, Paul LaNave as actors
My film: https://vimeo.com/66431936

Part 1: Pre-production
Before filming, myself, Missy and Kendra did a lot of collaborating and organizing. We created the characters from vague to specific personalities and people, their role in the film, as well as their wardrobe. A lot of it was a challenge because we had so many ideas of how the storyline could go. We had a hard time figuring out what should go in the film, and what could be left out.
A lot of the organization part came one night when the three of us filmmakers went on an adventure around Duluth. We found some beautiful places that would serve as locations in our film. That night, we also sat down and organized everything from start to finish on what was going on with the film, what shots we wanted to use, what the characters should do, etc. We also went out on a test shoot to one of our locations, Burrito Union. That is one of the more involved locations and scenes that we needed to film. I think once we did that, we were a lot more confident and understood exactly what needed to be done, and was done more fluently. There was so much uncertainty within this project that made it very stressful and a lack of patience.

Part 2: On the Set
SHOOT 1: First day of shooting we started at 6am at Burrito Union for the bar scene. We set up the lights, talked and directed to the actors, set up the camera to get the best artistic shots, and debated which shots to set up when. Just starting shooting finally went very well. It felt great to finally put our plans into action, and get something final for our film. We all collaborated well, and it was very hectic, but we got some absolutely gorgeous shots that I was very excited about. This shoot, we used two Nikon cameras, two tripods, a Zoom audio recorder for sound, lights, and a camera stabilizer as equipment. It was very fun working with the actors. They are amazing at what they do, and they really captured their characters, so we barely had to do any directing. They just needed to know specifics on how to move to make the film and the film consistent. We reacted to unforeseen variables by just being flexible and going with the flow. Otherwise the stress would overwhelm our environment and then we wouldn’t create as good work.

SHOOT 2: We shot in the Wedge to film Llana working on her schoolwork and her episode she has. That space had a very loud ambient noise to it, so it was very difficult getting good sound in there, which was one of our challenges. Another challenge was that we anticipated shooting in a classroom, and in the Food Court at UMD, however, we were there so early on a Saturday morning that nothing was open, so we settled on the Wedge. I think that was a very good decision because the lighting in there was very bright and beautiful, I am excited on how it turned out. We didn’t use any additional lighting, just our same two cameras with two tripods, and a zoom audio recorder.

SHOOT 3: We shot at my house for Llana’s kitchen and bathroom scenes. The difficulties we had on this shoot were that my bathroom is pretty small, so we only had room for one camera in it, and all of us could not see how each shot went until we looked at it afterwards. A couple of my roommates were also home, so we had to kick them out of the kitchen for a few hours. This shoot went very well and smoothly for the most part! We had to reshoot some angles because our actor Abigail had a ponytail holder on her wrist for some of the shots. I have two refrigerators in my kitchen, and those would turn on and off and have different background noise in each of the shots, so that was a little frustrating as well. My kitchen has very pretty open windows with natural light, so we didn’t use any additional lights. We shot with our two cameras, two tripods and a zoom.

SHOOT 4: This shoot we were at BU at very early in the morning again to shoot the fight scene between Chloe and Meyer. We got some very beautiful cast-away shots for the bar, and I was very happy about that! This day was kind of difficult because we needed everything to be consistent with their movements and what they were saying and how the actors were saying it every time. Another thing was that we didn’t know exactly how to do over the shoulder-angled shots. So those came out a little bit different than I think we expected. But Elizabeth and Paul, our actors were flawless when it came to encompassing their character. They did such a good job on actually fighting! And Paul played a very good drunk even when he wasn’t. They worked so well together, and we only had to direct a few minor things to them. This shoot we used a steady cam for some of the shots. One shot that was hard to do was with me walking backwards with Paul and Elizabeth following me, getting Meyer out of the bar. The first time I bumped into a bunch of stuff, so Missy had to guide me the second time.

SHOOT 5: This shoot was very long: we shot Llana walking outside, Meyer walking outside, and the two of them meeting and Llana giving away of the umbrella. This day was very bright outside, so I was worried about the snow reflecting too much for our shots. However, I think it turned out okay. It was also very windy that day, so a lot of our audio is loud from all of the wind. It was hard directing the actors this day because Paul’s movements needed to be accidental, but he seemed to have a hard time making it seem like that. He also had to do the shot of rolling down the hill, and he was very wet and cold afterwards, so he had a tough day! I wish that some of our shots were not taken with a steady cam, I wish we had used more tripod shots, because they came out a little more shaky than what I would have liked. We just wanted to get the shots and be done, so I don’t think we were as creative with this shoot with our shots. There are a lot of almost the same angles, so we didn’t branch out as much.

SHOOT 6: Our final scene was in Llana’s bedroom, in Kendra’s house. This was probably our shortest shoot, and went very well. I think we got some of the most beautiful shots in the whole film during this shoot. We had to be creative because it was just Llana sleeping and waking up, basically. We used no additional lighting, but once again we used our two cameras with two tripods and an audio zoom. The ambient noise quality in her house was perfect, and so quiet, it was beautiful. One of the shots we had was very long, and we did it multiple times: Llana laying out her clothes. I don’t think any of us used the shot, so I wish we would have filmed it differently or not spent so much time on getting that one right. I was very excited to get the shot by the railing that was my favorite part of this shoot!

Part 3: Post-Production
We did not reshoot any scenes, however I know that Kendra was not as excited how the final film came out since there was no rain. The extent of my special effects was slowing down the film in some parts to get the feeling of Meyer feeling heavy when Chloe was taking him out of the bar, and to get the impression that he was very drunk. I also manipulated the sound a little bit to make it not as loud in some of the windy parts, and to make it more realistic. Sound was very hard to work on in this film, and I think that is something that I really need to work on, and learn more about. I wish we had learned more about sound in our previous projects, not just taken it out or added music. I didn’t add any music to my film because I thought it was such a beautiful story, I couldn’t think of any music that would benefit it. I did not even look for any music.

Part 4: Final Edit
Title: April, version 2
Run time: 5:00

One of the choices that I thought made the film more interesting was when we are first in the bar, we don’t see Meyer’s face until the very end of Meyer and Chloe’s conversation. I thought it was a very good was to keep the audience on edge. That’s what I anticipated happening anyway. I wanted to tell both Llana and Meyer’s story together because both of them are so beautiful. In the fight scene, I cut it very tight and short to get the idea of tension and fighting, and towards the end of the fight, it slows down and gets more real and emotional. I also cut Chloe bringing Meyer out of the bar very interestingly too. I wanted to convey the idea of Meyer not remembering everything, like blacking out at certain points of their journey. Some transitions I made are very sharp and short, like from the slamming of the glass to Llana in the school. Other transitions are more flowing like the dissolve from Meyer having his first beer in the bar to Llana eating breakfast. I absolutely give more credit to editors now, their job is so difficult! I tried to make the pacing towards the end slower and more dramatic, because that’s what all the anticipation was supposed to be leading to. Premiere is an awesome program to work with, so it was never the software that I had any problems with. The audio was more of the problem. It was awful and made me more than frustrated on multiple occasions. I would have liked this film to be longer, I don’t think a lot of people understood how I edited it, or the background to the story, so I had to explain it to them. And I shouldn’t have to. However, for the time constraint I was given, I think I made a very beautiful film that showed off the actors talent of portraying a character.

Very impresive article and discuss.
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This page contains a single entry by Joellyn Rock published on April 11, 2013 12:32 AM.

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